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Recoil Pad for Remington 1100 1975 wood stock

Discussion in 'Rifle Discussion' started by Hook686, Apr 27, 2014.

  1. Hook686

    Hook686 Northern California Active Member

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    The current recoil pads that are listed for the Remington 1100 wood stock do not fit. Does anyone know of a source for a recoil pad that will fit the older Remington 1100's ?
     
  2. jonn5335

    jonn5335 Longview Active Member

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    You may have to purchase a pachmayr grind to fit recoil pad or a limbsaver slip on recoil pad is another option
     
  3. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Has your stock been cut down to fit a recoil pad, or, does it still have the original hard plastic butt plate?
     
  4. Hook686

    Hook686 Northern California Active Member

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    It still has the original black plastic plate.
     
  5. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Most rifle/shotgun stocks are usually cut down to compensate for the extra length that the recoil pad adds to the overall length.
    Aftermarket recoil pads are over-sized, so that they can be custom fitted to the newly cut down stock.

    This article describing LOP on shotguns was found on the web;

    "There are several factors that go into determining the correct length of pull (LOP). Arm length, chest thickness, neck length, and shooting style all play a role.

    I think that the best "rule of thumb" is to actually use your thumb in helping determine the correct LOP. Shoulder the gun in the shooting position while leaning forward (toward the target) slightly with about 60 to 65% of your weight on your forward foot.

    Your cheek should be firmly on the stock with your eye aligned behind the shotgun's rib. Your head should be lowered slightly (but not excessively) and your shoulders should be slightly rounded. Don't stand perfectly erect with a stiff back like a rifle target shooter would do.

    While in this "shooting position" the distance from the knuckle (which joins the thumb to your hand) to the tip of your nose should be about 1 1/2 to 2 inches. If it's greater than this, you are either in the wrong shooting position or the buttstock is too long. If it's less than 1 1/2 to 2 inches, then either you are "crawling the stock" (too scrunched over and too forward) or the buttstock is too short for you."
     
  6. Hook686

    Hook686 Northern California Active Member

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    ibett98 .... thank you for that information.