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Re-Loading Equipment info needed

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by billinvancouver, Jan 13, 2011.

  1. billinvancouver

    billinvancouver Vancouver WA New Member

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    Can you guys point me in the right direction, I want to get a basic to ok reloading setup. I'm only going to do .223 and maybe .40s&w
    A list of what I need to buy would be great.
    Thank you
     
  2. Page.k

    Page.k Seattle Active Member

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    LEE ANNIVERSARY PACK 90700
    Breech Lock Hand Press 90685
    LEE PRO 1000
    3- HOLE TURRET 90497
    Adjustable Charge Bar 90792

    Abc's Of Reloading: The Definitive Guide For Novice To Expert
    Barnes Reloading Manual
    Hornady Reloading Handbook
    Speer Reloading Manual

    Lee Auto-Prime
    Set of Shell holders 90198
    Lee Powder Scale 90681

    <surplus, obsolete, discontinued or factory second merchandise> Can save some cash over new.
    http://www.leeprecision.com/cgi/catalog/browse.cgi?1294992580.5997=/html/catalog/surplus.html

    Check out WWW.GRAFS.COM good price on shipping.
    RCBS single stage press may also be to your linking, I would suggest looking at the RCBS reloading(Are you RCBS fans happy now?).
     
  3. rodell

    rodell Newcastle, WA Active Member

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    Without being brand specific ...

    Press
    Dies in your caliber(s), along with the matching shell holders for your press
    Scale
    Reloading manuals, preferably more than one
    Sturdy bench or other support
    Calipers
    Powder Funnel
    Safety glasses
    You might prime on your press, or get a hand primer.

    Lee, Hornady, RCBS and Redding make all or most of this.

    One thing to consider is your expected volume of reloading along with how much time you can or want to devote to reloading. Depending on the answers, you might make slightly different equipment choices.
     
  4. billinvancouver

    billinvancouver Vancouver WA New Member

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    Thanks for the info this should get me started.
     
  5. HollisOR

    HollisOR Rural OR, South of Dallas Active Member

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    I am rather addicted to Dillon. Problem it can make a person lazy.


    BTW, looks like good information above. .223 cases can be more problematic than the pistol cases. Military cases need more prep, cases should be uniform in length. The books that were suggested should cover all of that. Good luck.
     
  6. Izzy

    Izzy Oakridge Active Member

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    This is what "I" recommend!


    1: As said "a good sturdy bench"
    2: RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme Master Reloading Kit. This is a good starting point for your set up, (in my opinion).
    3: Manuals. The Rock Chucker set come with the "Speer" manual, but as already stated, you should have more than one. I HIGHLY recommend the "Lyman" manual! Sierra, Nosler, Hornady, & Barnes also have great manuals.
    4: A tumbler. Some people say it is not necessary, but I can't imagine reloading with out one.
    5: Dyes & shell holders for each caliber you are reloading for.
    6: Primer pocket brushes.
    7: case trimmer. This is a must have! You can ask ten different people what case trimmer to get, and you will probably get ten different answers. "I" recommend the "lee" trimmer. It's very inexpensive, very easy to use, & very precise.
    8: A caliper (I prefer the digital type)
    9: Components Powder, primers & projectiles. These all depend on what "YOU" want.
    10: the most important thing you need for reloading is, PATIENTS! DO NOT GET IN A RUSH!
     
  7. Page.k

    Page.k Seattle Active Member

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    Maybe #10 is in the wrong spot, That's more like #1.
     
  8. skywag

    skywag On the Columbia River Active Member

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    Doctors need "patients."

    Reloaders need patience.
     
  9. Arkitek

    Arkitek Historic Downtown Roseburg Oregon Member

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    I'd try it out first, before you buy anything...John does a great class...here's his link:
    http://www.northwestfirearms.com/showthread.php?t=46293
    He's not far from you...I came up from Roseburg for it and it was the best two hours I could have spent...good experience AAA+!
    All I shoot now are reloads...beware...you will get addicted!
    He will get you started on a single stage press, then lets you run a few on a progressive.
    You walk away with a box of ammo.
    You'll have a thorough understanding of reloading when you're done, complete with handouts.
    Good luck! :thumbup:
     
  10. Izzy

    Izzy Oakridge Active Member

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    OOOPS! :bluelaugh: It looks like spell check can only do so much, for my ignorance!
     
  11. HappyRoman

    HappyRoman Sherwood Forest Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Wowzer, lot's of ideas.

    Reloading can become an addiction, something like guns.. Find reasonable componets,in significant volume for your reloading is sometimes problematic. If you looking at reloading 100 pieces, consider a single stage press, if your reloading 1000 pieces, consider progressive press.
    Everyone has a favorite.. If costs are a concern, then there are less expensive presses than "Dillon" I like the Blue machines. Check out Jhuey on here and maybe go to one of his reloading classes, and see what it takes.. Just my .02c
     
  12. humdrum

    humdrum Lakewood Active Member

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    A chronograph would certainly save countless hours and numerous components lost to "seat of the pants" velocity tests of various loads. Be safe and work up to what you need!
     
  13. HollisOR

    HollisOR Rural OR, South of Dallas Active Member

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    Good point, while a reasonable reloader may never need one and would be good to have, for a person who develops rounds, I would say it is a must to have.
     
  14. Matt45

    Matt45 SE SPOKANE COUNTY New Member

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    My $0.02

    The very first thing you need is a mentor. Find someone who's got 10 years or so reloading to show you the ropes. The next thing, before or after that, is to pick up a couple of reloading books, my preference is the 2-part Hornady manuals, because I use a lot of Hornady bullets...(Each manufacturer's bullet *may* vary in Coefficient values, so the load data does change, slightly) I'm getting off track...

    The important part is to read as much as you can beforehand and understand the BASICS first. An improperly loaded cartridge could leave you blind, crippled or remove a large chunk of your pride & wallet. Once you *think* you know something, get someone to explain it to you again!

    My strongest recommendation is to learn each process as a seperate step, understand why brass is tumbled & polished, what a case length gauge is for, how to trim and prep brass, ect. This is also why I recommend starting out with a single stage press. Learn decapping, re-sizing, throwing powder, and seating the bullet also as a seperate step each.

    The Lee stuff is good, as well as Redding, and also keep in mind most ALL dies are the same pitch/thread, therefore interchangeable.
    I prefer RCBS stuff, they have a great kit, I've seen them around at Sportsman's and WalMart for around $325. Rockchucker press, 5-0-5 scale, Uniflow powder measure, ect. I still have my first press, and use it quite often for load development, and things like small runs of .223 varmit loads.

    The Dillon stuff can come later, (I love my RL550), but put the time in learning everything to it's fullest extent and each step as an individual process...

    As an aside, RCBS and Dillon have the most liberal policies towards their products. I once bought 2 sets of dies at a garage sale that were missing some minor pieces. When I called I made it very clear how I came into them. They STILL sent the parts for free. Dillon has done the same for me when I accidently stepped on my LG primer pickup tool.

    Matt
     
  15. Matt45

    Matt45 SE SPOKANE COUNTY New Member

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    I hate to do it to you...but check #5.... dyes are for color.
    Dies are for reloading.


    (What did I win?)
     
  16. HappyRoman

    HappyRoman Sherwood Forest Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    As you can see there are many opinions and feelings about how, what, and what equipment to use when starting reloading. Here's mine..

    Why reload?
    What to reload?
    Where to reload?
    When to reload?
    What's my budget limited to?
    How many rounds might I really want reloaded?
    Where might I be getting supplies?
    What's my time frame

    When I started reloading some years ago, I wanted it all........So I went straight to Dillon Equipment on recommendation of several of my friends who had started on single stage presses. BLESS THEM ALL,

    If you want to learn, You have to start, and there is no better way than buy the books, several, and even a used single stage press, plus the supporting equipment and supplies.

    I jumped right in, as I want Quantity with Quality, to Dillon PRECISION equipment.. Today, they DILLON still have good stuff. Is there other's that are good too.. absolutely, Supported well.. absolutely.. But having has some 8 or so Dillon's over the past 20 yrs, and still using 4 on a regular basis.. it's hard to change, and I could not go back.. If I needed a single stage situation, the Dillon still works that way also.

    But this last weekend I found I had consumed, broken, or just worn out the Motor to the cartridge collator case-feed. Called Dillon Friday at PM PST, and today NEW motor & transmission arrived. No cost, Priority shipped. Also a new housing for the low primer unit, that appear I could have broke.. No Charge, fast, helpful, and friendly.. I guess price and quality do say alot.. THANK YOU DILLON PRECISION..
    JUST MY .02C.. Sandy

    Try taking JohnH's reloading class also.. It's a starting point.. tyvm
     
  17. Translator

    Translator Gorge Member

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    You might also want a bullet puller because sooner or later you will probably decide to dis-assemble some cartridges you have loaded. Some people prefer a bullet puller that mounts in your press and holds the bullet with a collet, but I find the above hammer style puller perfectly adequate. One warning: cartridges should not be very cold when you pull bullets; bullets stick like glue to the case when it is cold. You can warm cartridges up by putting them in your pocket for 10 min.
     
  18. orygun

    orygun West Linn Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Many companies make a complete (less Dies) reloading kit. I purchased a Lyman kit that had a turret press, primer seater, large and small primer tubes, primer flip tray, scale, powder measure, case trimmer, primer pocket cleaner, case debur tool, lube and lube pad. (I paid less that $200 for it, but that was about 1990!) It was everything I needed except dies, cases, powder and bullets.
    I'd look for a set up like this. While the RockChucker and the like are great presses, I prefer a turret style. Once you set up a die, it can stay in the head. You don't have to change dies to go to the next step, just rotate the turret top. The press I have will accept enough dies that I can set it up for two calibers and only have to change the shell holder, the dump tube in the powder measure and adjust the powder measure to switch from one caliber to the other.
    I used this set up exclusively until I got a Dillon 550. Almost sold it. Once I really got into loading bottle neck rifle ammo, I broke it back out and have used it for all but my rifle practice ammo since.
    For a bullet puller I use an RCBS inertia puller. Looks like a plastic mallet. Works well, but I wouldn't want to use it for high volume pulling jobs.
    Once you have the equipment you need a manual or three! I'd start with an older Lyman #46 manual and also a couple of others, specifically the one that is made by the bullet manufacturer that you plan on shooting. If you're shooting Hornady bullets, buy their manual. There is such a difference in bullets that seem similar, it's best to have the info "straight from the horses mouth".
     
  19. orygun

    orygun West Linn Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    +1 on JohnH and his classes. I learned on my own thru trial and error. Would have saved a lot of time if I'd had someone experienced to learn from.
     
  20. coop44

    coop44 Tacoma ,WA Well-Known Member

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    patience is #1 for me, a hand primer gives me a good "feel", reloading manuals, no such thing as too many.

    the rcbs rockchucker has been very good to me, need to buy another. That way I can leave one set up in my favorite caliber.