Question Regarding Fixed Magnification Scopes

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What is a typical distance to zero a fixed mag scope? I tend to zero my red dot at 50 yards, but not sure for a scope. Second question, are there any advantages to a variable power second focal plane scope given the zero only works at the highest magnification?
 
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What is a typical distance to zero a fixed mag scope? I tend to zero my red dot at 50 yards, but not sure for a scope. Second question, are there any advantages to a variable power second focal plane scope given the zero only works at the highest magnification?
This is wrong, wrong, wrong.

#1 what you zero any rifle at has more to so with your intended shooting distances than the construction of any scope used. Pick a zero that makes the most sense for your intended use. Then after you zero it, you can use the knowledge of how it operates at given distances and still hit targets outside of the zero accurately based on the trajectory of the bullet. If this is confusing, research it more.

#2 second focal plane scopes work at any range based on the zero they used. What you are confused about is any ballistic etches or mil dots, those are typically only accurate at the highest magnification on a second focal plane scope. There is a huge benefit to these scopes, one thing is cost, they are often cheaper than ffp scopes. For one thing, consider on a 1x8 power scope that is second focal plane, the scope will generally only be used on 1x or on 8x, where the ballistic etching or mil dots would be accurate. For a .223 for example, 0-200 can be shot minute of bad guy at 1x easily enough, and going out to 300 or 400 it isn’t that much of a drop ballistically to still apply some kentucky windage to put shots on target, but at that point, crank it up to 8x and not only is there now more magnification, but the ballistic reticle is accurate at that setting too. Still at any magnification, the zero still applies. If this is confusing, research it more.

First focal plane scopes get a huge groupie following when in reality, 99% of the people saying they have to have a ffp scope don’t even know why they think that, or understand how that difference will even benefit them.
 
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I have a couple of NightForce 8-32x56 NSX long-range target scopes with dot-in-dot MIL dots - they are only exactly representative of a true MIL at one magnification - x22. There is a hash-mark on the zoom ring to allow you to set it. I rarely move off it, except to search at the higher magnifications.
 
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My Leupold 6x's are zero'ed at 2.75" high@100. Depending upon caliber it would mean that the heavy duplex "pointer" would be dead on at 300, which is roughly the longest ethical shot I would take, semi-supported off of sticks and standing. Hope that helps!
 

bbbass

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Zero distance is completely dependent on the cartridge used, the power of the fixed scope, and personal choice/preference.

Using 4x Weaver, I used to zero at 100yds for deer hunting in NE OR. If using a 1.75 in heavy woods on the Westside, it might be different, say 50yds. But my 3x9 and my 4x12 were both set for 3" high at 100yds shooting 6mm Remington and 7mm Rem Mag respectively. And I know many old timers who back in the day zeroed their 3x9 at 200yds for elk in NE OR.
 
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J
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This is wrong, wrong, wrong.

#1 what you zero any rifle at has more to so with your intended shooting distances than the construction of any scope used. Pick a zero that makes the most sense for your intended use. Then after you zero it, you can use the knowledge of how it operates at given distances and still hit targets outside of the zero accurately based on the trajectory of the bullet. If this is confusing, research it more.

#2 second focal plane scopes work at any range based on the zero they used. What you are confused about is any ballistic etches or mil dots, those are typically only accurate at the highest magnification on a second focal plane scope. There is a huge benefit to these scopes, one thing is cost, they are often cheaper than ffp scopes. For one thing, consider on a 1x8 power scope that is second focal plane, the scope will generally only be used on 1x or on 8x, where the ballistic etching or mil dots would be accurate. For a .223 for example, 0-200 can be shot minute of bad guy at 1x easily enough, and going out to 300 or 400 it isn’t that much of a drop ballistically to still apply some kentucky windage to put shots on target, but at that point, crank it up to 8x and not only is there now more magnification, but the ballistic reticle is accurate at that setting too. Still at any magnification, the zero still applies. If this is confusing, research it more.

First focal plane scopes get a huge groupie following when in reality, 99% of the people saying they have to have a ffp scope don’t even know why they think that, or understand how that difference will even benefit them.
Thank you for the clarification. It makes far more sense that the ranging dots/bdc lines would not be accurate across magnification vs.the center dot crosshair. I know many people like the ballistic drop reticles, but it is just as easy for me to make adjustments on my end without them or messing with the scope. Thanks again.
 
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Thank you for the clarification. It makes far more sense that the ranging dots/bdc lines would not be accurate across magnification vs.the center dot crosshair. I know many people like the ballistic drop reticles, but it is just as easy for me to make adjustments on my end without them or messing with the scope. Thanks again.
Well understood, people who take the time to do so often create a dope chart for their given load and rifle based on the zero. The intent behind the ballistic reticle is to make quick distance estimations and shots on the fly - otherwise, all of that can also be accomplished with any mil-dot set up, it just takes some homework in advance.
 
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What is a typical distance to zero a fixed mag scope? I tend to zero my red dot at 50 yards, but not sure for a scope. Second question, are there any advantages to a variable power second focal plane scope given the zero only works at the highest magnification?
100yds...

the zero works on any magnification at the distance zeroed. Its only when you shoot farther than your zero distance and need to use holdover to compensate for drop that the SFP needs to be at the magnification you used to dial that holdover mark (preferably the highest).
 

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