Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Primer preference ?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Brandon44647, Aug 15, 2009.

  1. Brandon44647

    Brandon44647 Portland Member

    Messages:
    287
    Likes Received:
    5
    Lot's of different primers out there, I'm fairly new to the reloading world. Does it really make a difference or is it just a personal thing ?
    I've been using CCI mainly cause they seem to be more available right now, lately Remington's have made there way back to the shelf.
     
  2. NK777

    NK777 West of Portland Member

    Messages:
    781
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've used CCI, Federal, and Winchester. If I had to pick a favorite I'd say Federal but I don't really have any data to back it up.

    I purchased some Remington Large Rifle a little while back but I have yet to use them so I can't comment on them. The Rem's are apparently suposed to be a little milder then the above 3. Winchesters are credited as being a bit hotter then average. I believe CCI and Federals are in between.

    All of the above that I've used seem to light the fire just fine. I'll update you after I've tried the Remingtons. Only reason I bought the Remington was because it was the only brand I could find avaiable for sale at the time.
     
  3. reloadem

    reloadem Monroe, OR Member

    Messages:
    141
    Likes Received:
    1
    Use what you can find for plinking/practice ammo.
     
  4. 284guy

    284guy Woodburn Member

    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    10
    I prefer Winchester and Federal primers, but I have no problem with remington primers. I think Remingtons numbering system confuses people, but Ive used them for years with absolutely no problems at all. Even the 6 1/2 small rifle that they NOW say are not for 17, 223 etc. Ive used for years in AR's and my bolt guns with zero failures.
     
  5. motoman98

    motoman98 Gresham, OR Active Member

    Messages:
    676
    Likes Received:
    80
    For the average shooter, the brand isn't going to make enough difference to matter. (I prefer to stay with only one brand if I can)
    Try saying similar to a "Benchrester" and he'll throw a fit!
    Just REMEBER that CHANGING ANY of your components in a particular load can change the PRESSURE and when you change a component, you should work up your load again.
    Be safe!
     
  6. jib

    jib Central OR Active Member

    Messages:
    393
    Likes Received:
    21
    +1 :thumbup:
     
  7. Grizzly_A

    Grizzly_A Portland Metro Area Member

    Messages:
    866
    Likes Received:
    17
    I use CCI mainly. No complaints, but I'm not super serious about primers either. They go bang and give me good performance. I have used Winchester also, but I don't have a preference.

    Anyone use Wolf? :)
     
  8. koden

    koden Milwaukie, OR Member

    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    2
    I have used CCI, Winchester and federal. All function the same for me. The only thing I notice about the federal is that loading them into the aluminum feed tube take longer. I have an old press and load the tube by hand and the sharp edge of the federal primer catches on the tube and wants to turn it sideways as I drop them in.

    It's a very small issue and wont keep me from using them.
     
  9. ehunter

    ehunter Hilllsboro Oregon Member

    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think there is a difference but I prefer Winchester primers for slower powder and would use Federal if I could find any. The kicker is what ever you work your load up with stay with it. I have found a real difference between CCI primers and my loads vs Winchester but that is my gun? Winchesters shot a tighter group, for some reason and I was trying to get the CCI to work in my load since that is what I had more of?
     
  10. NK777

    NK777 West of Portland Member

    Messages:
    781
    Likes Received:
    0
    I also find that hotter primers shoot more consistently. Winchesters are typically the hottest of the standard primers, at least that's true in LP.
     
  11. jib

    jib Central OR Active Member

    Messages:
    393
    Likes Received:
    21
  12. johnboy

    johnboy Hillsboro Member

    Messages:
    339
    Likes Received:
    6
    Unless you are shooting bench comp......doesnt matter. Just stick with the same brand as others have said, or you need to start over in working up a load.......
     
  13. warnerwh

    warnerwh Portland, OR Member

    Messages:
    351
    Likes Received:
    22
    I find it worth the time to try a couple of different primers in the same load. In my .357 loads the standard primers shoot groups 1.5" , with the magnum primers the group opens to about 2.5". I sighted in at 25 yards. Both loads use CCI primers which is all I use for pistol. This is a load using 7.5gr of Unique under a 125gr Rem JHP. The almost exact same happened with .44 using 9gr of Unique (plinking load). The standard primer load is significantly more accurate. On my hot .44 load I use 296 which is mandatory to use a magnum primer.

    Using 2400 on hot loads the standard primers also came out with the better accuracy. Small changes can improve or erode accuracy. Personally I find accuracy very important even with my plinkers. Experiment a little because it could make quite a difference. One inch at 25 yards is two plus inches at fifty and so on and so on. I shoot to 100 yards or more with handguns for target or plinking so the accuracy of different loads is important.
     
  14. johnboy

    johnboy Hillsboro Member

    Messages:
    339
    Likes Received:
    6
    True,they can make a significant difference for target shooting. Also when developing loads it is necessary to shoot several groups with each loading....not just one and call it good. Must use bench rest and be sure you do not have a "fluke" group.....For hunting purposes on large game animals 300 yds and less, primers will not matter.
     
  15. Collateral

    Collateral Monmouth Member

    Messages:
    81
    Likes Received:
    8
    I found an article by a RICHARD FRAILEY where he had done extensive testing of different combination's of powder, bullets, primers, etc.
    Although the article is about reloading .284 win for accuracy, there are more generalized things that he discovered along the way that can affect most other calibers as well.
    This is part of what he had to say about primers:

    In my opinion, primer accuracy depends more on the cartridge than the powder being used. I
    have generally found that a cartridge’s most accurate primer will hold its advantage across most
    or all powder/bullet combinations (as WLR was the most accurate in each of 4 powders and 3
    bullet weights in this test). I cannot prove this theory, but it seems to hold true more often than
    not. Based only on my past observations, I use Federal’s 215 as my default primer for all cases
    larger than 30-06. WLR is my default for cases in the 30-06 range. I do not have a default
    primer for cartridges in the 22-250 through 308 sizes. In the 6BR down to 222 my default
    primer is Federal 205. I test primers in all cartridges I load, but these are the primers I use unless
    another proves itself to be more accurate.
    I have also found a few loads where one primer was more accurate than the rest by an unusually
    large degree. For example, the 223 Rem. and W748 was significantly more accurate with CCI
    primers in 3 out of 3 rifles. The 308 Win. and Varget strongly preferred Federal primers in 4 out
    of 5 rifles. The 270 Win. and either Viht N560 or H 4831SC shot much better with WLR
    primers in 2 out of 3 rifles. The 300 Win. Mag. and H 4350EXT was significantly more accurate
    with Federal 215s in 2 out of 2 rifles. As my findings in these primer tests indicate, it appears
    that I can add the 284 Win. as yet another example.

    The full article can be found here:

    http://home.earthlink.net/~rfrailey/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderfiles/284loaddata.pdf
     
  16. ehunter

    ehunter Hilllsboro Oregon Member

    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks that is what I found in my testing as well for my 2 calibers the 06 and the 270. While my experiment was less scientific.

    Thanks Collateral


     
  17. ogre

    ogre Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,755
    Likes Received:
    1,291
    If you are reloading for semi-automatic rifles I suggest that you use Wolf Magnum primers. The Wolf magnum primer contains no more fire then its regular primer but the primer cup is made from a harder metal and will help prevent slam fires. This is a good thing if you are unable or unwilling to dissasemble the bolt from your SKS to do a proper cleaning. The NATO spec. primers from CCI work equally well but the Wolf primers are less expensive.
     
  18. therifleman

    therifleman kennewick Member

    Messages:
    134
    Likes Received:
    4
    I have and use all of the brands and each of my rifles likes a different primer. My savage 10fphsp shoots a one hole group with 178amax 41.3gr 4064 rem brass and 911/2 rem primer but if you use any other primer the groups widen as much as 2inches at 100. The same holds true on all the other calibers I load for. Life can be damned hard when you are searching for the just right load for a dozen or more rifles.
     
  19. Blinky

    Blinky Sherwood New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Have just started reloading for pistol and all I could find was Wolf primers. Loaded and have shot some accurate plinking loads with no problems.
     
  20. Oohrah

    Oohrah NorthwestSouthern Oregon Coast Member

    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    8
    Orge is right about the Wolf mag primers. Not hotter, just harder. I don't have a clue on these military primers and have loaded thousands for 45 ACP, Garands, Carbines, and even Ruger Mini 14. Until recent years these military primers were not available to the public. There have never been any issues using the available non military standard primers. I always double check that the primers are fully seated, and prime the cases in a separate operation using a Lee hand primer, where you can feel resistance if anything may not be right. Any that seem tighter than normal with the GI cases, get set aside to be examed more fully. Very seldom does this happen, and all GI cases are swagged pockets rather than cut.
    As to primers, I feel most are pretty much the same until you put the mag primers into the mix. They are hotter and the effects on various powder can
    change results. Even the benchrest are pretty much the same except for quality control. There are many more factors involved of greater effect such as the weapon, temperatures, and any other variables including componets such as the brass, type of powder, bullet seating, and other mechanics. Even a bad hair day for the shooter may have more to do with that loading than brand of primer. Consistancy is probably the most important factor in all the loads.