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Predator impact

Discussion in 'Northwest Hunting' started by nwwoodsman, Apr 1, 2012.

  1. nwwoodsman

    nwwoodsman Vernonia Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter 2015 Volunteer

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    Just got back from a hike with my son here in Vernonia. Only went about 4 miles. About a mile into it we found an elk calf that had been chewed to pieces. About another mile down the road we spotted a herd of 20, all mature cows except for two small bulls. They winded us and took off into the timber so we naturally followed them. Just into the timber and a few feet off the elk trail we find another dead calf all chewed up. Heading back to the car we find a bird with it's head chewed off. That's just what we observed while sticking pretty close to the logging roads. I imagine if we did a little more poking around in the timber we would have found more dead.
    I guess what I'm getting at is that people say the bears, cougars, and coyotes don't have that much impact and that they're just playing their role in nature. I really starting to think that the predators have to be put in check more than ODF&W is allowing. In the last two years I've come across more bear and cougar sign than in the previous 15 years that I've been hunting. Banning hound hunting is one of the worst decisions the voters of this state ever made in regards to conserving wildlife. Sure, there are more predators running around. They pop up on the news every once in awhile roaming school grounds in places like Vancouver, Tualitin, and Scappoose, places where they're not wanted. But the deer and elk populations are dwindling because of it.
     
  2. hsullyc

    hsullyc North coast,Nehalem,OR Member

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    The coyote impact here on deer and elk is the same.I talked with a ODF guy about it and he says there studies show different results.A few people I have talked to are seeing the same thing you are the last few years.We are talking about having a drawing for a rifle,every coyote tail you trade in for a ticket.I know they used to do it down south,plus predator hunting is a blast.
     
  3. daiello91

    daiello91 NW Oregon Active Member

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    Bears and Coyotes can't do much to the herds once the fawns/calves are old enough to run with the cow/doe. As the bears and coyotes don't chase for that long. There is always an exception of course. However, those first few weeks they can have a big impact. Its problematic with the units with low buck/bull to cow/doe ratios because the females are being bred over an extended period of time which extends the birthing season which allows for a larger impact.



    Wolves and cougars are a completely different story. They have no limit on the time frame they damage the herds.
     
  4. nwwoodsman

    nwwoodsman Vernonia Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter 2015 Volunteer

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    I think I posted about this before but I'll tell the story again. Few years ago we were driving down an old skid road getting ready to start work. There was a fawn laying in the road, barely breathing and soaking wet. The wet part was kind of odd seeing as were about 1/4 mile from the creek and it was already about 80 degrees out. About the time I picked the fawn up and moved it to the side of the road we heard some rustling in the brush and the biggest black bear I've ever seen came exploding out of the bushes about 10 feet away, ran across the road, and away she went. I can't help but think they have just as much of an impact as any other predator
     
  5. daiello91

    daiello91 NW Oregon Active Member

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    Always an exception. Bears just have a very short attention span and are lazy they very rarely chase very far. They do eat very young fawns though, no doubt. We all know the very young fawns just play dead and don't run..those are the ones they'll eat. Very opportunistic. Once they can run though, it's a lot harder for the bears.
     
  6. prkrgrp

    prkrgrp oregon Active Member

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    all things in balance with nature, once man begins to make decisions based on money, all common sense and logic in regards to the balance of nature heads out the window
     
  7. hermannr

    hermannr Okanogan Highlands Well-Known Member

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    Natures balance is cruel. Too many prey, preditor success goes up, preditor reproductive success goes up, prey species numbers fall, excess preditor numbers go look for other prey species, or starve...and the cycle continues...too much prey, no preditor, prey eat themselves out of house and home and starve, too many preditors, same thing. Man is a preditor, but one that can think of a balance of prey food supply V prey species, unlike the others.

    Contrary to PC belief, man can be beneficial to wildlife,
     
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  8. coyote223

    coyote223 NW Oregon Stamp Collector,,,

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    Just wait until the wolves move to the west side,,,:paranoid:
     
  9. bruzer

    bruzer Grants Pass, OR Well-Known Member

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    It's Bigfoot plain and simple. Don't tease them with jerky or they'll get real mad. Good luck and stay safe,
    Mike
     
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