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Power Saws Part II

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by cbzdel, Jun 6, 2010.

  1. cbzdel

    cbzdel Tacoma, WA Member

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    Since my last thread went to the crapper lol..

    Just wanted to give an update:

    I went over to my grandpas house, he is in his early 80s. He used to be big into wood working but with his age starting to take a toll on his body he doesnt really do much anymore (he used to build his own furniture). Anyhow, while over there he was asking me about the house and I was telling him I am in the the market for a couple new saws. His face lit up like a Christmas tree :D

    He says I have one for you, I say grandpa I cant take your saw you love your tools. He says I am old, take it, I know it will have a good home. So we go out to the garage and he uncovers this table saw, he says is this what you want. I say Holy Crap that's nice and say sold I will take it. Its a older craftsman unit but the worktop is about 48"x36" It is a very good size compared to the ones I was looking at.

    The weather sucked, so he said come back when its not raining and its mine :)
     
  2. Wheeler44

    Wheeler44 SW Washington Member

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    Good for you, and good for him...I have my Grandfathers old Craftsman table saw...It's a good'un...
     
  3. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    Congratulations! You got very lucky. Those old Craftsman saws are awesome.

    Handle it with kid gloves. Your grandpa surely has it all tuned in that the blade/arbor are square to the table and the fence is parallel to the blade, and the miter jig/guide is properly adjusted.

    I'd go to YouTube and watch some vids on how to properly use it.

    Start with making a crosscut sled, and then a miter sled. These are indispensable things you make yourself easily and cheaply. In fact, making them will introduce you to your table saw, and you'll have your own tools which will make the saw much more useful.

    Have fun! :thumbup:
     
  4. pdxjohann

    pdxjohann Portland near Tigard Member

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    Righton Grand Dad. 3 x 4 table is a big one for older saws. Enjoy it in his name CZ. Once you practice some, you'll be planning and making wood projects for his Great Grand Kids :)
     
  5. theflyguy

    theflyguy Beaverton, Oregon Member

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    Make sure you protect the table top. I use to have a Craftsman tablesaw with a cast iron table. It was a good saw for what I was doing at the time. I upgraded to a JET commercial unit a few years back, needed more accuracy then I could get with the ol' Craftsman.

    Get yourself a tabletop conditioner/sealer to keep the metal protected and to help wood slide across the table top. When not in use cover the table....I do just in case the wife decides just to throw something out in the garage onto the table....instead of putting it away. :)
     
  6. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    Good suggestions. I was waxing my old Craftsman with Carnuba until I learned that it attracts moisture. I was given an old Craftsman about 35 years ago and it was really old then. It was very accurate. Is there any chance the bearings were wearing in your arbor or something? Those old Craftsmans were really built.

    I wound up with a 12" Delta for a lot of years and sold it not too long ago to gain space. I bought a Hitachi 10" for about $400 just to have a saw over in the corner. It doesn't "feel" as accurate only because the table is so much smaller. I have to use supports and then it's accurate.

    I think cbzdel got a really nice gift there. Now he can still buy that Skill saw. :thumbup:
     
  7. theflyguy

    theflyguy Beaverton, Oregon Member

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    Two sealers I put on my tabletop to protect them: "Boeshield 3-Part Tool Care Kits and Lubricant" and/or "Bostik TopCote, DriCote, and Bearing Lubricant", both brands work well and really help wood to slide across the tabletop.

    You can get either from here.

    I treat the tabletop maybe once a month, if I'm doing a lot of cutting...

    Good Luck....and watch those fingers

    26 years of cutting and never once has my fingers left my hands :D
     
  8. d1esel

    d1esel Ridgefield WA. Member

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    When I worked at a cabinet shop we always used Johnson Paste Wax on the table saws.
     
  9. theflyguy

    theflyguy Beaverton, Oregon Member

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    I use to do the same, but as I learned the hard way...sometimes wax can get on the wood and really mess up both staining and finishing. If you see what is referred to as "fish-eye" in a finish applied to wood....it is normally due to some residue (oil, wax, etc...) on the wood and the finish can not bond properly.

    Just my .02 cent worth
     
  10. pdxjohann

    pdxjohann Portland near Tigard Member

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    Try straight Silicon spray. (garage sales @ 0.10) or 2 bucks at auto cheapo store. that's what I use. Of course I stole the idea. But, no problems yet.
     
  11. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    It probably works well, but any silicon on the wood will repel any finish you try to apply. Body shops don't allow anything silicon in the building for fear it will get on a car and then cause fish eyes in the paint. They make products to get it off metal, but wood is too porous to ever get rid of it.
     
  12. pdxjohann

    pdxjohann Portland near Tigard Member

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    Nah, surface at the end of day's work with shop clean up. I'll absorb and dry. It would be silly thinkin to work wood on moist silicon.