Portable Reloading Bench

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by 2506, Aug 3, 2011.

  1. 2506

    2506
    Seattle
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    Has anyone made one of these? If so, would you share the plans for it? I'm downsizing in the next few months and, sadly, will no longer have a dedicated reloading/man room.
     
  2. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456
    Salem
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    I don't know what your situation will look like. Any table will become much stronger if you can bolt it to the wall. Is there a place you could hinge a 1 foot x 3 foot piece of 3/4 plywood to the wall so it could drop down out of the way? Then you could use iron pipe and fittings for legs and unscrew the legs to put them away. The press etc. could be mounted to plywood and C-clamped to the table. Get it really near a leg. Obviously you'll need a place to put your press and other tools and consumables away. Good luck.
     
  3. Swedish K

    Swedish K
    SW Washington
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    Have a workbench in a garage? or you could mount your press to a piece of ply wood with some cloth / felt on the bottom and c-clamp it to a sturdy table in the house. I had mine set up with studs and wing nuts so I just dropped the studs through holes drilled in my workbench - easy to do a quick setup and take down as needed.
     
  4. scrappydoo

    scrappydoo
    Federal Way
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    You could build something similar to the Lee reloading bench. But I have no idea how stable it is.
     
  5. deadshot2

    deadshot2
    NW Quadrant WA State
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    I lived in an Apartment for a year and reloaded using a Black and Decker Workmate for a bench. It's extremely stable, even when sizing large rifle rounds. I mounted my RCBS Rock Chucker to it using c-clamps. To make a larger work surface, just take a bigger piece of plywood, add a strip of wood the same thickness as the Workmate table top to the middle of it, and cap with a wider piece so it forms an inverted "T" that can be gripped by the Workmate table top clamping action.

    The whole "mess" can be boxed and folded to fit in a closet, under the bed, or behind furniture.

    As for the Lee reloading bench, it needs a lot of "counter weight" added to keep it stable. That shaded gray object at the bottom of the picture ideally would be a block of concrete.
     
  6. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456
    Salem
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    That's a really good idea. :)
     
  7. jer fly

    jer fly
    cottage grove
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    My entire loading operation is located on a single 2x12 board that is approximately 40 inch's long and just screwed to the wall via a 2x4 with another 2x4 going down to the ground. I load a lot and have never felt hindered by the size of my bench.
     

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