Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Polished carbon steel

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by taylor, May 23, 2010.

  1. taylor

    taylor Willamette Valley Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,134
    Likes Received:
    150
    On another site I've been following this guy who decided to strip the blueing off his revolver and HIGHLY polish it.
    It looks unbelievable! not flat mirror like stainless steel, but rich and creamy like molten silver.
    I knew stainless would polish but I didn't realize carbon would. Why don't more manufacturers offer this?
    Is it because carbon is much harder and takes more work?
     
  2. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,646
    Likes Received:
    2,371
    Because there is absolutely no corrosion protection on polished carbon steel. Bluing isn't much, but its something...
     
  3. kevlar

    kevlar Mt.Angel Active Member

    Messages:
    450
    Likes Received:
    28
    Yeah polished or not get it wet or sweaty salty hands rust with happen quickly as will the pitting. Its a bad idea for any gun you actually plan to use
     
  4. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,646
    Likes Received:
    2,371
    Agreed. Its a bad idea for any gun. Unless you plan on stopping and cleaning and oiling it every hour. Even a gun on the wall will pick up moisture in the air and rust...
     
  5. taylor

    taylor Willamette Valley Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,134
    Likes Received:
    150
    I don't understand why it is so; Carbon is much harder than stainless which scratches easily?
     
  6. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,646
    Likes Received:
    2,371
    Because stainless steel has other alloys added to the composition that resist corrosion. Carbon steel does not have these and is therefor more prone to rust and corrosion. Hardness has is only one property to metals and doesn't necessarily determine corrosion resistance...
     
  7. taylor

    taylor Willamette Valley Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,134
    Likes Received:
    150
    I wonder if extreme polishing would offer a sort of shell over the metal, make it harder for corosion to occur? it wouldn't be very pourus anymore.
    I still think with reasonable care it could be maintained. With real silverware with regular cleaning it won't tarnish, but if you go awhile with out cleaning it coroades. I think thats a good analogy.
     
  8. Redcap

    Redcap Lewis County, WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,990
    Likes Received:
    2,731
    No. Carbon steel is very different from silver. 'Extreme polishing' ( :laugh: ) wouldn't offer any protection against rusting.
     
  9. MrNiceGuy

    MrNiceGuy between springfield and shelbyville Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,665
    Likes Received:
    669
    Polished carbon steel is very common in higher end cooking utensils where they come in contact with salt and moisture daily....

    As long as you dry and clean it, you'll be fine...
     
  10. ZachS

    ZachS Eugene/PDX Active Member

    Messages:
    1,119
    Likes Received:
    11
    "Common" would be going a bit far... It's pretty rare. Also, it's a lot harder to wash and thoroughly dry a gun than a kitchen knife.
     
  11. MrNiceGuy

    MrNiceGuy between springfield and shelbyville Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,665
    Likes Received:
    669
  12. ZachS

    ZachS Eugene/PDX Active Member

    Messages:
    1,119
    Likes Received:
    11
    That type of carbon steel cookware is either coated with a rust-proof finish like enamel at the factory, or seasoned (like cast iron) by the user. I don't know that any modern society cooks on bare carbon steel. This use of the material has absolutely no bearing whatsoever on firearms.
     
  13. MrNiceGuy

    MrNiceGuy between springfield and shelbyville Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,665
    Likes Received:
    669
    The "season" comes from light coats of mineral oil or the like.

    This would be the equivalent of a good gun oil.

    Just like the instructions on my carbon steel knife set says:

    It's a direct comparison and is highly relevant to the topic on hand..... you're just very defensive for some reason.
     
  14. ZachS

    ZachS Eugene/PDX Active Member

    Messages:
    1,119
    Likes Received:
    11
    The seasoning is burned and baked on at high temperatures with repeated use - it's not even a little similar to a light coat of oil. A coating like that would work fine for a gun, I'm sure - as do dozens of others.

    Have you ever used carbon steel or cast iron cookware? Have you ever used a carbon steel knife? I have a good deal of experience with all of these materials, and your suggestions are laughable. If I seem defensive, it's because I don't want anybody to read your posts and get steered in the wrong direction.
     
  15. MrNiceGuy

    MrNiceGuy between springfield and shelbyville Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,665
    Likes Received:
    669
    I doubt it.

    Someone with as much experience as you claim to have would be more knowledgeable.
     
  16. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,646
    Likes Received:
    2,371
    Pretty sure I'd die laughing if ZachS was a metallurgist or materials engineer or something. :laugh:
     
  17. madcratebuilder

    madcratebuilder Ardenwald, OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,278
    Likes Received:
    175
    +1

    I have three hand guns setting here that have been in the raw for several months waiting for me to blue them. No rust at all. Lot of black powder revolver guys strip their guns to raw steel and let a patina develop. These don't rust and they use black powder and are washed with soap and water.
     
  18. ZachS

    ZachS Eugene/PDX Active Member

    Messages:
    1,119
    Likes Received:
    11

    Or any kind of engineer, for that matter... :laugh: I do, however, cook with a cast iron frying pan, a seasoned carbon steel wok, and an unseasoned carbon steel knife. I know that "seasoning" is not a "light coat of mineral oil," and I know what happens to a piece of plain carbon steel when it gets fingerprints or even a tiny bit of standing water on it. I claim no knowledge or experience beyond that - but what I have is enough to tell me that unfinished carbon steel is a relative pain in the *** to deal with.
     
  19. Ding

    Ding Lighter Side of Oz Active Member

    Messages:
    384
    Likes Received:
    28
    I have polished bolt carriers,triggers,bolt handles and various other parts that have been highly polished and have faired quite well without "seasoning" them.After I have polished them I put a light coat of oil and forgot about em and I add a light coat of oil after I clean them after use.They are still shiny.

    Point is you can do anything you want to any part,just take care of it as with anything,even parked and blued.
     
  20. MrNiceGuy

    MrNiceGuy between springfield and shelbyville Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,665
    Likes Received:
    669

    Of course you think this. You're an amateur that doesnt know how to season properly. :winkkiss:

    If you ever want to make your carbon steel experience better, I'm always available to help. :thumbup: