Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Police shooting video...DANG !!

Discussion in 'Legal & Political Archive' started by Chee-to, Apr 28, 2010.

  1. Chee-to

    Chee-to Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    Likes Received:
    1,704
    Dashboard video from a January traffic stop in Hamilton that ended in gunfire. A jury ruled on April 13, 2010 that Hamilton Police Officer Ross Jessop was justified in shooting Raymond Thane Davis.

    http://billingsgazette.com/news/sta...mix_cdf93fba-47ca-11df-9f5c-001cc4c002e0.html

    HAMILTON — A coroner’s jury ruled Tuesday that Hamilton Police Officer Ross Jessop was justified in shooting Raymond Thane Davis to death after the Hamilton man opened fire during a late night traffic stop in January.

    It took the six-woman jury one hour to make its ruling following nearly five hours of testimony, which included a videotape that showed Davis pointing a pistol inches from Jessop’s face and pulling the trigger.

    http://billingsgazette.com/news/sta...cle_13b074ce-47cb-11df-a0a4-001cc4c002e0.html

    The click of the revolver’s hammer hitting a previously fired round was audible on the tape.

    Davis fired a second time as the officer fell back and drew his own weapon.

    Jessop fired his pistol 14 times into Davis’ vehicle as it sped away. One round hit the man in the back. Davis, 36, died on the scene.

    His .41 caliber revolver was recovered on the floorboard. Its hammer was cocked and ready to fire.

    Witnesses testified Tuesday Davis’ taste for whiskey and a bad case of jealousy were to blame for the fatal confron-tation.

    Shannon Diaz, bar manager at Hamilton’s Office and Silver Coin Casino, said Davis was acting strange enough on the evening of Jan. 1 that she wouldn’t serve alcohol to him.

    "He was completely not like himself ... when he starts drinking whiskey, he just completely turns into a different person," Diaz said.

    She told him he needed to leave.

    Davis returned later and found Diaz, his girlfriend and another man sitting outside. The man, who is black, had loaned Davis’ girlfriend his coat.

    That set Davis off, Diaz said.

    He shouted racial epithets and later texted the same to his girlfriend. When he returned to the bar, Diaz had bounc-ers and her husband put him out.

    She said later someone received a text message saying Davis had a gun.

    Tracy Womack, owner of the Ponderosa Bar, said Davis was fine when she first saw him around 9 p.m., but she knew he’d been fighting with his girlfriend when he came back later.

    "He was drinking Black Velvet cokes," Womack said. "I also saw him do a snakebite Yukon Jack with Rose’s Lime juice."

    When Davis’ girlfriend came back to the bar later, she asked to hide behind the bar.

    "She sat on a little stool ... she didn’t want him to see her," Womack said.

    He spotted her the second time he came back and started yelling racial epithets at her again about wearing the man’s jacket. Womack told him to leave.

    "I knew I needed to protect her and get him gone," she said.

    Davis moved to the Rainbow Bar where he continued to drink whiskey and Cokes.

    The bartender there, Nicholas Renzo, remembered wrapping up Davis’ hand, which was bleeding.

    "He said he hit a wall or something ... anyone who knows him, knows he shouldn’t drink whiskey," Renzo testified. "He gets violent."

    He told Renzo later he had a gun. Just before Davis got ready to leave that night at about 1:30 a.m., he looked at Renzo and told him "It was nice knowing you. I’m not going to see you for awhile."

    Renzo said he thought was the alcohol talking.

    Davis told another patron at the Rainbow Bar the same story.

    After saying "it was a pleasure knowing you," Brian Webb said Davis took his hand and placed it on the small of his back. Webb said he felt the outline of a pistol.

    "He was definitely three sheets to the wind," Webb said.

    Jessop was raised in Pinesdale. He is a 2001 Corvallis graduate who has been working with the Hamilton Police De-partment since 2008.

    On Jan. 1, he came on shift at 4:45 p.m. He was scheduled to get off work 10 hours later at 2:45 a.m.

    Jessop first saw Davis that night talking to two Hamilton police officers.

    The men were questioning Davis about some battery cables that had been cut on his girlfriend’s car earlier that night. Jessop saw Davis shake the officers’ hands and go back inside.

    The officers told Jessop that Davis was heavily intoxicated and had been warned not to drive.

    Not long afterward, Jessop spotted Davis’ Lincoln Navigator driving north on Second Street. He pulled in behind and followed the vehicle as it turned on Adirondack Street. When Davis used a turn lane to drive straight through the next intersection, Jessop turned on his lights.

    Davis crossed the railroad tracks on Fairgrounds Road and pulled over on a patch of dirt almost directly across from the fairgrounds entrance.

    Jessop activated his spotlight.

    And then the officer saw something that he’d never seen before during a traffic stop. Davis reached out and slowly adjusted his mirror so he could see the officer.

    "That’s very unusual," Jessop testified. "Our spotlights are very bright and they hurt your eyes."

    Most people immediately turn their mirrors so the light is reflected away from their face.

    "At that point, I was caught off guard," he said. "I approached with a little more caution than I usually do."

    Jessop could smell the alcohol on Davis as soon as he neared the window. He asked the man how much he’d drank that night.

    "Plenty," came the reply.

    Jessop said the face that stared out the window that night was hard to describe.

    "It was argumentative ... very sure of himself, almost cocky."

    Jessop asked him what he meant by plenty. A split second later the officer was staring down the barrel of a .41 mag-num Smith and Wesson pistol.

    "The end looked bigger than a quarter," Jessop said.

    Jessop heard a click.

    Davis pulled the trigger and the hammer fell on an empty round.

    "My very first thought ... after I realized it was a revolver was I was terrified. Absolutely terrified," Jessop testified. "I recall thinking I wasn’t going to see my wife again. I wasn’t going to see my mom, my brothers, or my sisters, or my coworkers or my dogs. I was terrified."

    Jessop moved his face away from the threat as fast as he could.

    "I did hear the click," he said. "I remember stopping. I was actually hoping it was just a joke ... I remember thinking why would you do that to an officer?"

    And then he saw Davis’ head readjust.

    "I remember thinking the reason he’s readjusting his head is he’s going to shoot again," Jessop said.

    He ran toward the back of Davis’ vehicle, while drawing his Glock, Model 22.

    He heard a gunshot.

    "My next thought was I had to defend myself and eliminate the threat to me," Jessop said. "I don’t recall drawing my weapon. I do remember my first shot. I was conscious that I was shooting my gun."

    Jessop thought he’d fired seven or eight rounds. It turned out he’d fired 14.

    Six bullets hit Davis’ vehicle, including the one that drove through the passenger and driver’s seats and into Davis’ back.

    After Davis’ vehicle stuck the power company’s building and came to a stop, Jessop loaded his rifle and got in his car and moved closer.

    Ravalli County Attorney George Corn asked him why after he’d just been nearly killed did he move closer to his as-sailant.

    "My duty as an officer is to make sure the community is safe," Jessop said. "I had no idea if I hit him or not. My thought was to get close enough to keep the area safe and keep myself safe."

    Davis was dead when he was pulled from his vehicle by officers soon afterward.

    The investigation of the shooting was completed by the Missoula Police Department. The investigative team all tes-tified Tuesday. John Pohle, the Powell County Coroner presided over the inquest.

    Missoula Police Department Lt. Steve Brester led the investigation.

    This wasn’t the first time Davis had been on the wrong side of the law, Brester said.

    In 1998, he was convicted of felony aggravated battery in Idaho after he beat his ex-girlfriend’s boyfriend after she claimed she’d been abused. Witnesses in that case said he kicked the man 20 to 30 times while he was on the ground. When Davis heard the man making a gurgling sound, he went back and stomped on his face eight or nine more times.

    He was convicted in 2003 of assaulting a Hamilton Police Officer and sent back to prison.

    At the end of the hearing, Corn called Brester back to the stand one last time.

    By now, Jessop was sitting in the front row, flanked by his fellow officers. His wife was sitting a row back and other supporters filled the courtroom.

    Corn wanted Brester’s professional opinion: Was it necessary for Officer Jessop to shoot Davis?

    "My opinion is that Mr. Davis purposely put his .41 magnum into the face of Officer Jessop with the intention of kill-ing him," Brester replied. "Officer Jessop had no choice but to respond with lethal force."

    The jury agreed unanimously.
     
  2. .45's and .38's

    .45's and .38's Happy Valley OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,896
    Likes Received:
    88
    The guy stuck that .41 magnum right up to the officers head. :eek: The officer is lucky he is alive. I think the police officer did the right thing.
     
  3. .45's and .38's

    .45's and .38's Happy Valley OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,896
    Likes Received:
    88
    In 1998, he was convicted of felony aggravated battery in Idaho after he beat his ex-girlfriend’s boyfriend after she claimed she’d been abused. Witnesses in that case said he kicked the man 20 to 30 times while he was on the ground. When Davis heard the man making a gurgling sound, he went back and stomped on his face eight or nine more times.

    that is absolutely EVIL........this makes me wonder.....if you were carrying & came across this, what would you do? why call the cops when seconds count for the guy on the ground getting beat.
     
  4. timbernet

    timbernet Boring, Oregon Member

    Messages:
    573
    Likes Received:
    4
    Umm, it took them an hour to decide that??? :confused:

    HECK YES!

    Wow...

    Now they just need to carry a bigger round, like, .45ACP or 10mm ;) (I KID!)
     
  5. MrNiceGuy

    MrNiceGuy between springfield and shelbyville Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,665
    Likes Received:
    669
    What the heck is a "confron-tation"?
    And what are "bounc-ers"?

    At least they got cooperation from the "Police De-partment".

    I think whoever wrote that article is a little hyphen hap-py.
     
  6. BigBull 301

    BigBull 301 PDX almost Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    262
    Good shoot! Give him a medal!!
     
  7. Dyjital

    Dyjital Albany, Ore Flavorite Member Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    4,884
    Likes Received:
    5,790
    Props to the quick thinking of the officer.
     
  8. EUGENE the REALTOR

    EUGENE the REALTOR Portland Metro Bronze Vendor Bronze Vendor

    Messages:
    676
    Likes Received:
    215
    Just curious what would've happened if the same thing happened to a civilian. Obviously we won't be pulling over someone, but let's just say it's a gun sale (not from this forum of course :D).

    You walk up to seller's car and the same thing happens. He fires a round or two, then drives off. Is your life still in danger? I'm not saying the officer was wrong in returning fire, I'm just curious if a civilian would get the same result in court.
     
  9. .45's and .38's

    .45's and .38's Happy Valley OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,896
    Likes Received:
    88
    im guessing that if you shot the guy in the back...you'd go to prison.

    to argue with what I just said......Does it matter how far the guy gets away from you? he just tried to kill you. how far does he have to get away before your life isnt in danger anymore? that officer kept on shooting, after the guy was pretty far away
     
  10. MrNiceGuy

    MrNiceGuy between springfield and shelbyville Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,665
    Likes Received:
    669
    I'd like to think so, but from what i've read, I dont think so.

    Also, there would be a healthy dose of members on random gun forums who would probably be bashing the civilian shooter for firing on a fleeing man, shooting him in the back, and exacerbating the anti-gun agenda.


    Personally, I believe it to be a justified shot that was made instinctively in order to protect his own life from a man who has shown his clear intent to end it.
     
  11. 2Z4

    2Z4 Milwaukie Active Member

    Messages:
    243
    Likes Received:
    87
    Makes me wonder what would happen if you changed Hamilton MT for Portland OR.
     
  12. EUGENE the REALTOR

    EUGENE the REALTOR Portland Metro Bronze Vendor Bronze Vendor

    Messages:
    676
    Likes Received:
    215
    If his car remained parked, I'd fire everything I had. Not so sure if the guy was speeding off though. Of course when I factor in adrenaline, fear, anger, etc...I probably would've done the same thing.
     
  13. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,674
    Likes Received:
    4,849
    No question whatsoever, officer justified. He even had the skill to pick up what he dropped
     
  14. timbernet

    timbernet Boring, Oregon Member

    Messages:
    573
    Likes Received:
    4
    Plus there is a chance that a drunk guy that just tried to shoot you (twice in this case) might return before you can get in your car and return to safety... or he might have pulled off the road a ways up and is waiting for you.... All unknowns....

    There are no static rules - every scenario is different. In this case, eh, I would like to think that a civilian would be cleared -- the shooter was one bad cookie that needed to be taken out of the pool. But he was driving away.... could he have shot backwards again? Maybe... Could he have turned around really fast and hit you with the SUV? Maybe... Could he have driven a little bit forward and then slammed it in reverse to hit you? Maybe.

    I think he had "AOJ" (Ability, Opportunity, and Jeopardy) -- too many things could go wrong by the time you made it to the car and could get to safety. Remember, you just had a big gun pointed in your face with the intent to kill and then a shot fired in your direction, with the intent to kill... you will be running on such an adrenaline high you might not be able to start your car and drive...
     
  15. toobigtofail

    toobigtofail PDX Member

    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    0
    That was a demonstration of the awesome power of the Glock 22, the .40 S & W round, and the judicious use of lethal force by a police officer. His actions were exemplary.
     
  16. Dyjital

    Dyjital Albany, Ore Flavorite Member Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    4,884
    Likes Received:
    5,790
    Fire until the threat is no longer a threat.

    Isn't that what is taught in the military?
     
  17. Trlsmn

    Trlsmn In Utero (Portland) Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,838
    Likes Received:
    1,186
    Dang that's some scary stuff right there!
     
  18. MarkSBG

    MarkSBG Beaverton Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,467
    Likes Received:
    31
    Very scary. It's easy to sit back and monday morning quarterback the situation, but I am surprised that the guy got the drop on the officer. He got really lucky.
     
  19. Working 4 U

    Working 4 U Eugene Active Member

    Messages:
    248
    Likes Received:
    120
     
  20. Stomper

    Stomper Oceania Rising White Is The New Brown Silver Supporter

    Messages:
    12,903
    Likes Received:
    19,496