Pietta 1858 Conversion Cyinder ammo

Discussion in 'Handgun Discussion' started by nighthawk, Mar 2, 2012.

  1. nighthawk

    nighthawk
    PNW
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    Hello all,

    I have a Pietta 1858 that I plan on buying a conversion cylinder for. It says cowboy loads only, but could the steel framed Pietta handle regular 45LC loads or 45ACP loads?

    Any info is appreciated.

    Thanks
     
  2. Spad

    Spad
    Kennewick,WA, the desert side
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    Check out the pressures in the Cowboy loads as a starter. Query the conversion cylinder company on what is thier maximum pressure & safe pressure.What company manufactured the cylinder?...Spad
     
  3. nighthawk

    nighthawk
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    I haven't bought one yet, I'm thinking of either Howell's or a Kirst Konverter.
     
  4. jonn5335

    jonn5335
    Longview
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    The cylinder should be fine as it's rated for higher pressures but I would be worried about the frame it is not designed to handle those pressures it could possibly stress and crack with higher pressure loads which most likely would'nt happen but is always possible better safe than sorry right?
     
  5. ogre

    ogre
    Vancouver, WA
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    I feel that John5335 has made a valid point concerning the frame of this revolver. Even if you stick to black powder loads the heavier bullet will cause additional stress to this frame so I suggest that you use the lightest cast bullet in 45 caliber that you can find.
     
  6. wired

    wired
    Yakima
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    Old post I know but Ive got a 1858 Remington Pietta ( newer ) with a Howell conversion. Ive run hundreds of rounds of 45 colt loaded with 36 grains of FFFG triple 7 and 200 grain hard cast bullets. Speed averages in the 1125 FPS range for about 550 ft/lbs muzzle energy. No signs of stretching or any other problems. Not the most accurate thing but Ive never been a huge accuracy guy. Minute of man is fine. With the original cylinder I usually go a little hotter with 38 grains ( all the cylinder will handle uncompressed) and a 141 grain ball with 1220 FPS. Ive seen testing where people claim to run 40 grains triple 7 FFFG triple 7 but I don't really think its even possible to cram that much in there uncompressed.
     
  7. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf
    SE Portland
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    I always ran black powder compressed like a black hole. Caveat.. I only used black powder in cap and ball and muzzle loaders though. I think it's the proper and wise thing to do in those.
     
  8. wired

    wired
    Yakima
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    Ive got a few cap and balls including originals. . I would never fill the open top colts with triple 7. The Remington copies get it all the time. About the most you can fill one with is 38 grains and still get a ball in there. I ran one through the chronograph at 1210 FPS with a 200 grain conical. Yes, That is 650 Ft Lbs. Thats when I decided I'd better pick up a Ruger Old Army if I wanted to keep my fingers where they are. Those can be loaded up into the 900 Ft Lb range with a little work.
     

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