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Pardon my ignorance, but what does SKS stand for?

Discussion in 'Rifle Discussion' started by accessbob, Mar 5, 2012.

  1. accessbob

    accessbob Molalla, OR 2A Supporter

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    I'm just getting into shooting and I've picked up a lot of information over the last several months but I was wondering what an SKS is? What does that mean? :confused:
     
  2. snooopidydoo

    snooopidydoo Medford Oregon Active Member

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    Quick google search:

    The SKS rifle was designed by Sergei Gavrilovich Simonov. The initials stand for Samozaryadnyi Karbin Simonova, or “Semi-Automatic Carbine, Simonov”.
     
  3. Aero Denezol

    Aero Denezol Salem Active Member

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    You can find most of the general info from Wikipedia.

    The SKS is a gas-piston semi-automatic rifle, similar to an AK47, which uses the same cartridge (7.62x39). Unlike the AK, the SKS is top-loaded, and looks more like a traditional hunting rifle than an 'assault rifle'. They used to be really, really, cheap and plentiful before supplies dried up and imports from different countries were banned.

    I've had one for years and it is rugged, field-grade accurate, simple, and reliable. I've heard of people hunting with them or keeping them as ranch/truck guns. I keep mine for novelty purposes mostly.
     
  4. Aero Denezol

    Aero Denezol Salem Active Member

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    You can find most of the general tech data/info from Wikipedia.

    The SKS is a gas-piston semi-automatic rifle, similar to an AK47, which uses the same cartridge (7.62x39). Unlike the AK, the SKS is top-loaded, and looks more like a traditional hunting rifle than an 'assault rifle'. They used to be really, really, cheap and plentiful before supplies dried up and imports from different countries were banned.

    I've had one for years and it is rugged, field-grade accurate, simple, and reliable. I've heard of people hunting with them or keeping them as ranch/truck guns. I keep mine for novelty/fun purposes mostly.