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Paint home interior?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by cbzdel, Apr 28, 2010.

  1. cbzdel

    cbzdel Tacoma, WA Member

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    I have been reading all over the internet and found mixed review..

    Do you primer walls that have already been painted or just paint directly over them?

    I am going from a white to a off white, so not a major color change, but the wife wants a "accent wall" and we are going from a white to a brown color.

    I have painted before in the past and just slapped on the new color and it seems to have turned out just fine, but this I want to last and be a quality job.
     
  2. elsullo

    elsullo Portland Oregon New Member

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    Ya, just paint over them, especially if you are using latex indoor paint. "Semi-gloss" latex interior paint actually covers and looks better than "Flat" latex paint, plus it sheds dirt and stains better, and is washable. If you feel that you need a second coat, wait at least a day for the first coat to dry fully.

    IF the surfaces to be painted are greasy, such as in a kitchen or a smoker's house, you should first wash the walls to remove the grease. Use a bucket with a weak solution of "Spek-n-Span" (that first term spelled with an "i") to wash the surface---good stuff, it does not need rinsing but still has enough TSP in it to cut the grease. Flush the sponge with solution often.

    IF you are painting over gloss-finished woodwork with latex paint (not the best thing to do), roughen up the surface first with a medium grade of steel wool, to give the new paint a texture to stick to. For gloss finished woodwork and oil-based paint is best.

    Random thoughts: "triangular" corner rollers work great! ROLL paint on going UP; then from the top, turn sideways, and pull down gently to feather the edges of the paint strip. Then you can use regular rollers for the flat surface.

    If you have to prime any surfaces, beware of using "Z-Prime" paint without lots of good ventillation! It contains harmful psycho-active chemicals that can make you really psychotic for a while if you breathe too much of it. Not fun! There seems to be no permanent damage though. There seems to be no permanent damage though..............................elsullo :D
     
  3. theflyguy

    theflyguy Beaverton, Oregon Member

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    I use to sell paint for 4 yrs....

    Depending where they are...if they are in the kitchen or bathroom I recommend using TSP. TSP cleans grease/oils and helps cut the gloss before painting. If you are doing a lighter paint over a darker....I will tint the primer to help cover, before I put the final color paint on the walls.

    I always recommend using latex on the walls and oil on trim...you just get a better looking finish...just my .02 cents.
     
  4. pdxjohann

    pdxjohann Portland near Tigard Member

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    Righton ElSullo. About 1/2 the painters I know use primer. 1/2 just use an extra coat of latex. El Sullo has has good ideas. Though, the corner rollers looked like gimmicks to me in the past. I'll try it if one color top and body. Just don't forget to pencil in Beer at 4:30. That's just after 4:20 for some.
     
  5. cbzdel

    cbzdel Tacoma, WA Member

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    Finally got around to start painting.. I tried to paint satin directly over cleaned semi gloss and it became VERY streaky, I threw on a second coat and it looked better we shall see when it dries.. It was just a small test patch behind the toilet tank area. Maybe I need to sand the whole bathroom which is Semi-Gloss?

    The bedroom just SOAKED up the paint, it looks like CRAP.. I just did cutting in around outlets and switches.. I am trying to decided between multiple coats vs. using primer..

    I would hate to keep throwing paint on anything and wasting it because I should of primed.

    Thats the one thing I HATE about painting.. I know it will turn out good in the end but the frustration of making it get there haha!
     
  6. elsullo

    elsullo Portland Oregon New Member

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    First, in my original post I had a brainfart and typed "semi-gloss" when I meant "satin" for the new paint. "Flat" paint has the worst coverage and appearance. Your choice of satin was the best!

    When you cleaned did you use a cleaner with TSP (tri-sodium-phosphate) in it, like "Spec-n-span?" Besides cutting old grease deposits, TSP sort of etches the surface of old paint and microscopically roughs it up enough to easily hold new paint without streaking. I should have recommended rubber gloves too.

    Big question: are you using a "quality" brand of paint? NOT a store "house-brand", I hope. It really makes a big difference. A national or regional brand name paint is made to high quality standards and covers best, and lasts best. Chain store house brands of paint are usually of a much lower quality, and require more coats to cover. I have been out of the business for twenty years so I don't know what to recommend anymore. Consumer Reports does annual paint testing, but it is usually only of East Coast brand names---still might be worth a look......................elsullo