Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Optics on concealed carry handguns

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by spengo, Apr 24, 2010.

  1. spengo

    spengo GLORIOUS CASCADIA Active Member

    Messages:
    1,267
    Likes Received:
    25
    k184863p1000784.jpg
    Thoughts? Doctor's battery life is like 6 years, so that is no longer an issue. High suppressor irons that co-witness through the optic should it fail.

    k184863p1000784.jpg
     
  2. Mr. Black

    Mr. Black Zigzag, OR Member

    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    2
    I am thinking that in a situation which requires you to draw, aim and shoot in a split second wouldn't leave too much time to aim at much..

    At that level of response, aiming becomes second nature. And the optic sights won't add much to the iron sights...

    Just my thoughts...
     
  3. d1esel

    d1esel Ridgefield WA. Member

    Messages:
    231
    Likes Received:
    2
    I'm planning to install a Docter red dot sight on my CZ Tactical Sport. It should be a great setup for grins and giggles type shooting. But I cant see how it makes sense on a combat pistol. These small red dot sights are prone to “dot searching”. If the gun is presented out of alinement with the target you won't see the dot. And thus you will be dot searching.
     
  4. pokerace

    pokerace Newberg Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,293
    Likes Received:
    753
    I have crimson trace on all of my carry guns.
    I like them, and I have nothing hanging on the gun.
    I can also use the sights at any time.
     
  5. spengo

    spengo GLORIOUS CASCADIA Active Member

    Messages:
    1,267
    Likes Received:
    25
    I dunno, if you always present in a consistent way it shouldn't be much of a problem I wouldn't think. IPSC open class shooters almost always have a reflex or red dot and it seems to be pretty fast there. I guess I'll have to try it and see for myself if I have a dot searching problem.
     
  6. spectra

    spectra The Couve Moderator Staff Member Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    1,913
    Likes Received:
    720
    Same here with the crimson I can still use the night sites if need be:thumbup:
     
  7. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,108
    Likes Received:
    834
    Link

    Point Shooting is a method of shooting a firearm that relies on a shooter's instinctive reactions, kinematics, and the use of body mechanics that can be employed effectively in life threatening emergencies, to quickly engage close targets.

    This method of shooting is recognized and supported by the NRA for use in life threat situations where the use of Sight Shooting can not be employed because there is no time to use the gun's sights, in low-light conditions, and because of the body's natural reaction to close quarters life threats which prevents meeting the marksmanship requirements of Sight Shooting. (See: NRA Guide to the basics of personal protection in the home.) Point shooting is also called threat focused shooting.

    Point Shooting (See AIMED Point Shooting or P&S described below), has been used and discussed since the early 1800s. See the article on www.pointshooting.com which provides 22 source books and URL's (1804 through 1941), where the P&S method is mentioned or recognized: http://www.pointshooting.com/history.htm. It is detailed in Lieutenant Colonel Baron De Berenger's 1835 book on rifle and pistol shooting, which is included as one of the 22 source books mentioned above. The US Army's first instructional manual on the use of the Model 1911 pistol (one of the 22 sources mentioned above), specifically mentions it but in a cautionary way due to the design of the slide stop: ..."(3) The trigger should be pulled with the forefinger. If the trigger is pulled with the second finger, the forefinger extending along the side of the receiver is apt to press against the projecting pin of the slide stop and cause a jam when the slide recoils."

    Early 1900s shooting experts such as William E. Fairbairn and Rex Applegate advocated point shooting, while many experts later in the century advocated the use of sights. Later sight-based methods include Jeff Cooper's "Modern Technique" method which became popular after World War II. The Modern Technique is also known as "sight shooting", and the issue of sighted versus unsighted or point shooting has been debated since as early as 1835.

    (Continued)