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It went to the range today. It's been probably minimum 10 years since I've had this one out, yet it's one of my favorites. Ruger Model 77RL Mark II, .223 Rem. Not the best picture, kinda out of focus.


P6140638.JPG

I bought this rifle new in 1992, but Ruger records show that it was made in 1991. It came from a dealer called Western States Arms, they were from somewhere in the 503 area code. They used to come up from Oregon to the Wash. Arms Collectors shows to sell guns.

Of course the gun came without a scope. Being the cheap dick that I am about scopes, I didn't want to buy a new one. So I found a used Weaver KV 2-7X to put on it. The scope was pretty old when I bought it. The seller said he'd had it on a .270 Win. rifle for many years and it has the wear to show for it. To adjust the power, you have to remove a cap to turn a wheel like a reticle adjustment. The scope is still functionally just fine. Including the simple crosshair reticle, which is fine in the purest sense.

When I bought this Ruger, it was to replace a Winchester Model 70 FW that I'd bought, also in .223. I sold that rifle for one reason or another, and soon regretted it. But later I couldn't find another one (this was still pre-internet), so I settled on this Ruger, thinking it wasn't quite as good as the Winchester. Which was a push feed, USRA-made gun of about 1985 vintage. This Ruger has turned out to be better, in my opinion. It's a real tack driver but you can't shoot it too many times before the pencil barrel heats up. This is the RL variation, which may stand for "real light" but that's just my guess.

The rifle is still in excellent condition, not counting the old scope. No scratches or dings. Which is accounted for by the fact that I've never really used it to do business with. In another post, I mentioned my pal who lived in Everson, Wash. He had a farm up there, mostly leased out to other people. Part of it was leased to another guy to keep some beef cattle on. My friend, Ed Evins, is dead now. But he used to call me once in a while, complaining that there were coyotes lurking about, the beef cows were calving, he was worried that the coyotes would get into the calves, maybe I should come up with a rifle, etc. Well, he lived a 90 mile drive away from me, so if he'd seen a coyote and called me right away, by the time I got there with a rifle, of course they would be long gone. This was the rifle that I figured I'd take for that purpose and never did.

When I had it out to the range today, it was a couple of minutes of windage off. A few shots and I had that fixed. With some extra fun shots, I fired it 14 rounds. At that rate it won't wear out very quickly. I keep a tag looped around the barrel with the pet load that it's zeroed for. It has a 1-12 twist bbl., which was pretty normal in 1991 when it was made. Accordingly, I shoot 50 to 55 gr. bullets out of it. Only sporting design bullets for .223, it doesn't like 55 gr. FMJ BT bullets made for 5.56mm throated barrels. Which I've read is not unusual with .223 throated barrels. I had a .222 Rem. rifle that was the same way, it didn't like 5.56mm bullets, it would throw them all over the target.
 
Very nice to hear the background on your rifle. Thanx!
I have the same scope sitting on an old Mossberg 152. Before that it rode another old .22, a Savage model 4C deluxe. Has always worked well for me.
 
It went to the range today. It's been probably minimum 10 years since I've had this one out, yet it's one of my favorites. Ruger Model 77RL Mark II, .223 Rem. Not the best picture, kinda out of focus.


View attachment 1899725

I bought this rifle new in 1992, but Ruger records show that it was made in 1991. It came from a dealer called Western States Arms, they were from somewhere in the 503 area code. They used to come up from Oregon to the Wash. Arms Collectors shows to sell guns.

Of course the gun came without a scope. Being the cheap dick that I am about scopes, I didn't want to buy a new one. So I found a used Weaver KV 2-7X to put on it. The scope was pretty old when I bought it. The seller said he'd had it on a .270 Win. rifle for many years and it has the wear to show for it. To adjust the power, you have to remove a cap to turn a wheel like a reticle adjustment. The scope is still functionally just fine. Including the simple crosshair reticle, which is fine in the purest sense.

When I bought this Ruger, it was to replace a Winchester Model 70 FW that I'd bought, also in .223. I sold that rifle for one reason or another, and soon regretted it. But later I couldn't find another one (this was still pre-internet), so I settled on this Ruger, thinking it wasn't quite as good as the Winchester. Which was a push feed, USRA-made gun of about 1985 vintage. This Ruger has turned out to be better, in my opinion. It's a real tack driver but you can't shoot it too many times before the pencil barrel heats up. This is the RL variation, which may stand for "real light" but that's just my guess.

The rifle is still in excellent condition, not counting the old scope. No scratches or dings. Which is accounted for by the fact that I've never really used it to do business with. In another post, I mentioned my pal who lived in Everson, Wash. He had a farm up there, mostly leased out to other people. Part of it was leased to another guy to keep some beef cattle on. My friend, Ed Evins, is dead now. But he used to call me once in a while, complaining that there were coyotes lurking about, the beef cows were calving, he was worried that the coyotes would get into the calves, maybe I should come up with a rifle, etc. Well, he lived a 90 mile drive away from me, so if he'd seen a coyote and called me right away, by the time I got there with a rifle, of course they would be long gone. This was the rifle that I figured I'd take for that purpose and never did.

When I had it out to the range today, it was a couple of minutes of windage off. A few shots and I had that fixed. With some extra fun shots, I fired it 14 rounds. At that rate it won't wear out very quickly. I keep a tag looped around the barrel with the pet load that it's zeroed for. It has a 1-12 twist bbl., which was pretty normal in 1991 when it was made. Accordingly, I shoot 50 to 55 gr. bullets out of it. Only sporting design bullets for .223, it doesn't like 55 gr. FMJ BT bullets made for 5.56mm throated barrels. Which I've read is not unusual with .223 throated barrels. I had a .222 Rem. rifle that was the same way, it didn't like 5.56mm bullets, it would throw them all over the target.
RL, would indicate Ruger's Ultra Light series.
👍👍👍👍👍
 
Great write=up! That KV scope is a living legend in itself. First operational variable power scope made and sold in America. I put one on a vintage (1950's) Rem 721 in .270 after sending it to these guys to make it "just like new".

www.vintagegunscopes.com

Careful: Optics "cheap dicks" rarely get out of that website retaining their economical appendage. :cool:
 
Didn't that era 77 had a red recoil pad? Its something I've always thought was unique to Ruger. I always liked the looks especially the Alaskan in walnut and stainless with the open sights.
 
Didn't that era 77 had a red recoil pad?
The black pad on the rifle is how it came out of the box. I think 1992-93 is recognized as the transition era when the red pad was phased out. So this .223 must've been one of the earlier rifles equipped with the black pad. My only previous thoughts about it have been that it's a bit overdone for .223 recoil.
 
www.vintagegunscopes.com

Careful: Optics "cheap dicks" rarely get out of that website retaining their economical appendage.
Thanks for the link to that resource. Their prices really take my breath away. There is a business that specializes in restoring older Redfields, costs about $100 for what I need. I have one that I'm still thinking about sending in. I have one Redfield on a beater Mod. 70 Win., I must've gotten in just under the wire before the original Redfield went T.U. that I sent to them to fix under the lifetime warranty.

A few months ago, I found a pretty nice Weaver K6-W for $20. It looks better than the one shown for sale at Vintage Gun Scopes. Of course mine isn't recently reconned like the one they offer. They date it to the middle 1970's. I haven't mounted mine yet, but I'm thinking of putting it on my Ruger No. 1 in .223 Rem.
 
I had one of these Ruger RLs I gave to my old gun smith. The rifle was nice and light and a joy to carry. I put a leupold Vari X 2-7 on it. Close to perfect. It was amazingly accurate for such a thin barrel. Mine had a red pad.
 
As an advisory to persons interested in "older scopes". That was in quotations for a reason. Your practically brand new scope (purchased a mere 10 years ago in 2014) is here considered an "older scope".

For the purposes of this advisory, your :"new: scope" has lost much of what made it new, and you can't even see it.

All nitrogen-filled scopes (which means ALL modern scopes) have a shelf life. 10 years is the recognized time period (where anti-fog gasses like Nitrogen are charged and sealed inside a scope) where the anti-fogging gas has deteriorated to a level offering little or no protection.

This is not to say your 31-year-old scope cannot go a few seasons without fogging up. It is certainly to say it should not be the scope on your rifle for a once-in-a-lifetime hunt, unless you have had it recharged to be fog-free.

In a throw-away society where everything is becoming a Bic LIghter and repair or maintenance of anything is beneath us, Firearms and Optics remain almost singularly reliable if one considers them worthy of the effort to maintain.
 

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