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odd, yes odd shot gun primer Q?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by thorborg, May 3, 2014.

  1. thorborg

    thorborg portland oregon Well-Known Member 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    I have this old Stevens single shot 12 ga. with a broke firing pin. I annealed, filed, ground, sanded and polished a #2 high speed steel drill bit into a likely candidate for a replacement. Not knowing exactly how long or the shape of the working end is I don't want to heat treat it until all's good. (I'm getting there!)
    I popped in a couple of spent cases and since the strike zone is slightly off center feel I have reproduced the divot fairly close in shape and depth.
    It's raining now plus, I don't want to spend the time driving to the woods to see if it worked on a live round So--- OK here is the question:

    Are the primers for 12 ga shotgun shell close enough to large rifle or large pistol primer (which I have) that I could punch out and press in one of them (sans powder and shot of coarse) to see if the thing goes bang from my shop?
    Any opine appreciated. And yes, I could just punch one out and see if they fit but the wife wants me to take her to dinner and I don't know what that has to do with the price of fish but it could save me form dragging the stuff out to try it, if it is fruitless.
    Thanks in advance
    Thor
     
  2. rick benjamin

    rick benjamin USA, Or, Damascus Secure the drama Silver Supporter 2016 Volunteer

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    209 shotshell primers are larger and deeper in size than rifle and pistol primers.
    Go to bimart and buy a tray. couple bux
     
  3. My 3 sons

    My 3 sons Bonney Lake Active Member

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    Too bad you're not up my way I give you some primers just to see what you had done to it
     
  4. My 3 sons

    My 3 sons Bonney Lake Active Member

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    Deleted dbl post
     
  5. thorborg

    thorborg portland oregon Well-Known Member 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    I took the advice and bought some at Bi Mart wasn't what I expected, not even close. but fire pin worked fine. I tempered and drew it back and fired of another half dozen blanks just to make sure its not too hard.
    I'd post pictures but don't know how, it not like the classified where I can get to "my pictures" folder
     
  6. best defense

    best defense Beaverton, OR Active Member

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    Congratulations. It sounds like you solved the problem.
     
  7. thorborg

    thorborg portland oregon Well-Known Member 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    IMG_20140503_182802_513.jpg Thanks Joe!!!!!

    IMG_20140503_182802_513.jpg
     
  8. Rick4070

    Rick4070 Central Oregon coast Active Member

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    From another site:

    FWIW, from Brownells

    "As a general rule, [pin protrusions for] centerfire rifles and handguns usually measure between .050” and .060”. Shotguns are a little longer at .055” to .065”. Rimfire guns usually fall into the .028” to .035” range. However, inertia-type firing pins, the slanted pins in over-and-under shotguns, and many other designs will provide exceptions to these generalized guidelines. If you’re in doubt about how much protrusion is correct, try to find other examples of the same model to measure or try contacting the manufacturer for the specifications. Another good source of information is the series of shop manuals by Jerry Kuhnhausen. These books are great source of detailed information and specification for the many models they cover."

    As to your heat treating, a piece of O-1 might have better, a HSS drill is somewhat different than basic tool steel.

    A simple way to make sure that the steel is at critical temp is to stick it on a magnet, and heat until the part drops off into the quenching medium.

    Then temper back until you get the hardness you want.

    This method works pretty well for small parts.

    That all being said, your firing pin seems to be working for you well, and it looks like a good fix...

    Kind of fun being able to make your own parts, isn't it??