Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Nosler long range accu-bonds

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by oremike, Jul 18, 2016.

  1. oremike

    oremike Creswell, Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    352
    Likes Received:
    331
    I just got a 7mm Remington Mag and am wanting to set it up as a long range, open country shooter. I'm thinking these bullets will be a good place to start. I've ordered the 175 gr.s anyone use these and what are your thoughts.
     
  2. PaulB47

    PaulB47 Hillsboro Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,854
    Likes Received:
    2,596
    I think the BC numbers they print on their boxes are not very credible. Beware.
     
  3. P7id10T

    P7id10T Cedar Hills Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    1,210
    Likes Received:
    1,238
    The old BC numbers are significantly lower, IIRC ~.520 G1BC.
    I haven't tried any of the newer ones, looking at them, they don't look too much different than the older ones. I'm not so sure how they improved them so much to change the BC by almost 0.120.
     
  4. PaulB47

    PaulB47 Hillsboro Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,854
    Likes Received:
    2,596
    You can figure out the actual BC by using a pair of chronographs, I believe. Or at least, you can find Pejsa's "retardation coefficient" that way, and then convert that to BC. The standard BC is not a very reliable measure in any case.

    I recall somebody wrote an article in Precision Shooting magazine, where he got a couple of chronographs and figured out the BC of every bullet he could get his hands on (or maybe it was just the top BC ones). Of course BC depends to a certain extent on what gun you shoot it from, but he found that the manufacturer's numbers tended to be optimistic in most cases. You could see there has to be a strong incentive to fudge those numbers.

    It's also known that moly coating bullets can boost the BC of any bullet.