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North Armerican Big Game Animal deserving of most respect?

Discussion in 'Northwest Hunting' started by Spitpatch, Dec 21, 2013.

  1. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    >Here's your chance, pipe in. No "poll" will be conducted, as that would not be "in the spirit" of the question itself. This is not a competition. It is merely a question.

    There will be no winner or loser (kinda like special Olympics, but for a different reason).

    After a time, I will present my candidate. I trust yours will be better supported. Your candidate need not be an animal you have actual experience with: it could certainly be a game animal you hold in your dreams, yet to be fulfilled.

    Your submissions should hold support of researched evidence, including observation in the field (either by yourself, first hand accounts, or written accounts by field journalists.)

    Which huge critter on this huge island deserves the biggest tip of the hat?

    Speculate, Dream, Report, Advise, Conclude.
     
  2. simon99

    simon99 Central Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Is this including Alaska? Because if it is, I'd say Moose. If Alaska is not included I'd say Grizzly Bear.
     
  3. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Howdy Simon,

    Simon sez Moose. And to qualify, North America certainly includes Alaska and Canada (despite the fact you can blame them for other stuff).
     
  4. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Alright Simon:

    Make the case for Mister Moose.
     
  5. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg WA Well-Known Member

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    Yep, Griz/Brown/Moose/Hogzilla

    Moose because they have a serious 'tude and are BIG
     
  6. swampertwo

    swampertwo Just moved to Olympic peninsula!! Active Member

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    For me--has to be Wapiti!!
    Anyone who has hunted and bagged a big bull knows they are the ultimate!
    I was once told"You can shoot one dead and they will run to the bottom of the deepest canyon within 5 miles before they fall over."
     
  7. reloaderjoe

    reloaderjoe Keizer Member

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    Sasquatch........ only kidding. I have never been north enough for an oppurtunity to hunt them, but I would love to bag a big bull moose someday. Also I have always dreamed of shooting a big grandaddy trophy roosevelt. I think of them both as equally magnificent big gammers.
     
  8. Trick

    Trick St Helens Active Member

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    Big Game.....I would say Moose. Overall Bad A$$ of the continent......Wolverine.
     
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  9. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    He shares no genus with anything on the planet. Degraded with the igonorant assignment of "antelope" by those of recent arrival to this blue globe, he shares no affinity with any such animal, and such calling is beneath his antiquity and integrity. The animals on the African Continent that are truthfully called "Antelope" cannot shine a candle to him. He came before. He survived.

    He ran with, and ran from the Sabre Toothed Tiger. He survived. The Sabre Toothed Tiger is remembered as a fossil. He still runs today.

    He has vision that early on in human analysis was judged at 8-power binocular. Later, it was perhaps more accurately assessed as being an advantage of definition: much like an eagle enjoys. The ancient genetic fact exists that he sees everything in his realm better than anything that has ever chased him or ever will chase him. His eyes are elevated on his skull on the same pedestals that sprout his horns. No other animal on the prairie sports this high advantage.

    He runs at a speed that is generally recognized by world biologists as "Number Two" for land animals. All the same world biologists will agree that he will summarily dispense with a Cheetah at any race over a quarter mile. He can hold 40 MPH indefinitely. He has been documented accelerating and cutting in front of a motor vehicle traveling 60.

    His lungs and heart are developed way beyond proportion for his body size (average 100-120lbs for a mature animal). Bone structure strength in his legs is documented by machine tests as astronomically beyond even huge beef cattle.

    Keeping one in captivity is extremely problematic: even scientific study of diet, and replicating such in captivity results only in steady deterioration and premature death. He will not be kept.

    There is no match and no comparison elsewhere on the planet for complete and respectful regard to a North American Big Game Animal. The venerable Bison may have been a challenger aside from his close cousins having existed on other continents.

    The Pronghorn holds the undisputable title for North American Big Game Animal deserving of most respect.

    Having stated mine, I still invite your submittals. All have made good cases. Fight the Pronghorn if you dare!
     
  10. orygun

    orygun West Linn Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    No offense to the speed goat, but I say Blacktail. One of the most difficult to hunt animals on this continent. Well, the hunting's not too hard, the bagging of a good one is!
     
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  11. Caveman Jim

    Caveman Jim West of Oly Springer Slayer 2016 Volunteer

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    It's the one I'm knealing over thanking the creator for its life.
     
  12. salmonriverjohn

    salmonriverjohn N.W Oregon coast, Gods country Well-Known Member

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    I have to agree with orygun. I've hunted and taken many critters of many different species in north America and I have to say that the mature Blacktail is one of the most challenging on the continent. Yes there a few very nice examples to the species that are taken each year by someone that happens upon them by chance, but to hunt one of these rain forest ghosts on his home turf, in his living room can be downright tough, exhilarating, rewarding, frustrating and at times defeating hunts one can experience.

    Take the Elk for example, a herd of Elk has arguably one of the best noses in the business of prevention detection. Throw in ten or more sets of nostrils, twenty eyes and ears on swivels and you have a very strong defense to penetrate. The mature Blacktail has only his own to rely on, they very rarely share a location with another mature buck and are extremely territorial.

    There is some debate about the origins of which came first, the Mule deer, the whitetail or the Blacktail, but my money is on the Black. And for those that say the whitetail takes the sneaky, cagey deer category, my guess is they haven't hunted big rain forest ghosts yet or they wouldn't say that.

    As far as the Moose, not even close. Yes the Moose lives in locals that make him a challenge at times, and finding a location to take a truly huge one can be an arduous task, but the Moose is not the brightest fella on the block either and can be approached with rather minimal caution, and why not? He hasn't much fear of a mere two legged 200 pound critter in his domain, why even a pair of 150 pound wolves had better give him a wide berth if and when they cross paths as lesser game would be less of a threat to their well being.
    A hundred and seventy pound Blacktail buck on the other hand would be much better choice for either them, the cougar or the lucky Black bear that comes within striking distance. And for those that don't believe the Black bear can't run 35 mph for short distances, think again. Yes the Blacktail has all these predators on tap to keep him and his senses honed to a keen edge, or he's done.

    That brings me to old Yogi. The Black bear can be a very rewarding species, and a mature Boar a real trophy if taken by spot and stock, but other than the obvious tooth and claw advantage the only real advantage he holds the cards in, is his nose. Probably the best in the business in that regard. He can be pure poison if hit poorly, but as the Moose is, he normally is fairly easy to approach once spotted given good wind, again he like the Moose has very little to fear.

    I've never hunted Grizzly and have no desire to, I'll leave that to those that do. I truly admire them having lived with and around them for many years in SE AK. And yes, there too the diminutive Sitka Blacktail is a food of choice for them. Although he's more likely fall prey to a forest inland Griz than a coastal behemoth such as the Kodiak.

    I've taken a few speed goats and while I respect their eyes, speed, stamina and wariness I don't feel their in the same category of challenge as the Blacktail. Both are a real challenge,
    but the Pronghorn can be spot and stocked in the great wide open, try that in thick devils club, vine maple and blow downs with the master of survival! You bet, binoculars come into great use here, but were not talking miles, were talking yards. Yards that are choked with flora and fauna, are his front room, bedroom, kitchen and back door if you fail to recognize that piece of ear, leg, eye or antler at spitting distances with your binnos, your done.
    One wind shift, one wrong sound and its over that quick. Yes I like the pronghorn, but he's no Blacktail in his element.

    I hunted one buck exclusively last year. I had opportunity's to take other deer, and I went home some nights and slept fitfully thinking about the what ifs as I tossed and turned. In the end I had to salute my quarry with a wry grin as he had bested me for a month and I settled for tag soup. I'll be back and hopefully he'll still be there. Was it worth it? Yep. To be able to hunt one of the craftiest critters on the planet, in his home, it was worth every minute.
     
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  13. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    To those presenting our native Blacktail as a prime candidate, I must grant serious consideration. Chuck Adams may have said it best (and for those who don't know, Mr. Adams was a serious rifle hunter long before he began his archery career): "The most challenging trophy on the face of the planet in all my experience is a mature Coast Range Blacktail buck." In that vein, I would have to agree.

    The Blacktail also enjoys advantage in this "ratings game" as being quite unique to the North American Continent. NOT to the same degree of a genus reserved (as with the Pronghorn), but quite distinct as compared with Moose, Bison, Brown Bears and Wapiti (all having close cousins on the other continents).

    Hunting challenge? I'd join Chuck Adams quickly in handing that award to the Blacktail.

    But the Pronghorn unquestionably bests them all for survival, longevity, uniqueness, and specific adaptation to his environment. Therefore he still gets the lion's share of my respect.
     
  14. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    May I be so bold as to enter this poll with a "Small Game Animal" as an entry, not being a large game hunter.
    As I speak, I can feel his dark beady eyes glaring at me in triumph through my dining room windows as I type these words.
    He is cunning, extremely acrobatic in his actions to elude capture and without a doubt the most tenacious in his pursuit of food.
    My quarry is the "Sciurus niger" and so far, all of my efforts to harvest this bad boy of the local forest has fallen to naught.
    My hunting ground is my suburban backyard and the tools for harvest being employed are only handmade traps made out of local materials.
    I set out on this quest knowing that it was an uphill battle, as he has the enviable ability to climb, jump and literately fly through the air from one location to the other.
    My biggest regret was to brag to my wife on how easy it would be to bag this puny adversary.
    My only consolation is that he has fleas, and I don't.
     
  15. orygun

    orygun West Linn Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    squirrel 048.jpg
    I see you....

    squirrel 048.jpg
     
  16. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Dirty Bustards. Hey, if the OP willingly participates in hijacking his own thread, is it still hijacking?
     
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  17. orygun

    orygun West Linn Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I think that's where it turns into a joy ride.
     
  18. tahoe2

    tahoe2 Seattle area, Washington state Member

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    My .02 cents, has our local Roosevelt Elk at the top of my list, it's true I have been bested by the Coastal Blacktail many times, but I have bested him also. Speedgoats (Pronghorns) are also wonderful animals to stalk, but their curiosity is their Achilles heel and I have yet to bag my Elk in 5 years of actively pursuing this wonderful adversary, he is both keen and ghostly, I have heard him, smelled him, seen him and tracked him within 3 minutes and still, he disappeared right under my nose, eyes, and ears. It's rather embarrassing, but I will prevail and he will be mine. It is with the utmost respect and admiration that I have for these animals that I hunt them in their element, on their turf, and because of them, I am a better man. Even without success, I have given them my all, and they have shown me who I truly am. It's not just for meat but the Spirit of the Wild that keeps me pressing on, I feel so blessed to have the freedom to hunt these wonderful animals, and I will, until I am not physically able. My vote will change in time, but for now The Roosevelt is my Holy Grail.
     
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  19. JackThompson

    JackThompson Valley of the Demons Well-Known Member

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    As a man who has hunted the blacktail buck for over a decade without even getting a shot off on one I am inclined to offer my respect to this critter.

    But let's weigh a few more comparisons between the two first.

    Here are some of the things that earn my respect in the blacktail.

    -Documented jumping over 12 foot high obstacles while chased, and up to 30' straight ahead.

    -don't follow the same eating or roaming pattern from day to day. This is maddening for a human to hunt!

    -can sprint and jump through virtually impassable terrain, uphill, through 3' of snow, both ways!

    (Just read up on Pronghorns on Wikipedia, super interesting!)

    Ok, so their odd claims to fame (uniqueness and survivability) definitely earn them a top spot in the respect department, but my nod still goes to the blacktail, because he's a mountain man, and pronghorns have to shimmy under goat fences because they can't jump them.. They'd get squashed up here in the mountains.

    Blacktail are the toughest and best survivor out there, and given time will prove that they can even evade predators as long as the pronghorns. Unless we make more mountain roads...they seem to not see or hear trucks, ever...
     
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  20. nextgenar

    nextgenar roseburg Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I have to join the crowd saying Blacktail. How many of you have ever killed a really big blacktail? I mean the 20" + spread heavy horned monsters that will haunt your dreams once you have seen him. I've had the opportunity to see a number of those bucks in my lifetime, yet I've never hung my tag on one. I do have 2 bucks of that class mounted and hanging in my living room, one was ranked 52nd in the state record books second edition. Both were taken by my wife 2 years in a row. Big blacktails hide in some of the most brush choked steepest, deep dark canyons on the face of the earth, where rain can be measured in feet per season rather than inches. They can't be patterned like whitetail because they don't travel in any sort of pattern, they are mostly nocturnal outside of the rut, and rarely will the big boys step out in the open where spot and stalk techniques can be used. A truly big blacktail in my opinion is truly the best trophy game animal in america!