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"Hunters need to contact the landowner and ask for permission prior to entering private property. "

For some time now, in Oregon, unless private land is explicitly listed as being in the Access & Habitat program as allowing hunting, then hunting is explicitly not allowed without permission.

"Trespass. It is unlawful to hunt on private property without permission from the landowner. See ORS 105.700 and 498.120. The duty to retrieve and to not waste does not justify otherwise criminal conduct including but not limited to trespass."


ORS 498.120
Hunting on another’s cultivated or enclosed land​

(1)​

No person shall hunt upon the cultivated or enclosed land of another without first obtaining permission from the owner or lawful occupant thereof, or the agent of such owner or occupant. No prosecution shall be commenced under this section except upon written complaint filed with a magistrate. The complaint shall be verified by the oath of the owner or lawful occupant of the cultivated or enclosed land, or the agent of such owner or occupant.

(2)​

For the purpose of subsection (1) of this section, the boundaries of “enclosed” land may be indicated by wire, ditch, hedge, fence, water or by any visible or distinctive lines that indicate a separation from the surrounding or contiguous territory, and includes the established and posted boundaries of Indian reservations established by treaties of the United States and the various Indian tribes. [Amended by 1959 c.318 §1; 1971 c.580 §1; 1973 c.723 §83]

---------------------

I also had heard that if you posted "no hunting" that this prohibited yourself too, but I do not believe this to be true. I can find no law or regulation to that effect. I am going with those that assert it is the same as posting no trespassing.

I believe that all you have to do is comply with the rules regarding posting land as no trespassing and even that is probably not necessary. By definition, I believe the laws changed a while back that said unless the land is known to be public, or if private and explicitly within the Access & Habitat program as allowing hunting (it must be on the map, otherwise it isn't allowed), then it must be assumed to be private land and hunting is implicitly not allowed.

I.E., you don't need to post "no hunting" - by law, that is assumed. At most you need to comply with the posting of "no trespassing signage. Even that is probably not necessary if the land is enclosed with a fence or markings.
 
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Same thing with "No Trespassing" signs. That's why it's important to put the signs on the fence, in case you change your mind and want to go onto your property, you can take the signs down. I had a nice piece of property once and made the mistake of putting the "NO Trespassing" signs on posts about 20 feet inside the fence line. I sure miss that property.
Just pretend you are hopping the southern border as an illegal and walk right in.
 

Gunner3456

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A law professor once told us "There are only two kinds of land. There's your land and not your land and it's up to you to know the difference."

He was adamant that neither fences nor signs were necessary for someone to be guilty of trespassing.

Cheers
 
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Shouldn’t you be worrying about Canadians living in WA?
Are they sneaking over the border to the tune of now millions of people? I’m not aware of huge numbers of criminal activity being perpetrated by illegal Canadians in America, and the Washington jails aren’t majority filled with illegal aliens from the norther border like California’s are from the southern border. Comparing the two borders is like apples and vegetables (because oranges is too similar to be an example)
 
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Are they sneaking over the border to the tune of now millions of people? I’m not aware of huge numbers of criminal activity being perpetrated by illegal Canadians in America, and the Washington jails aren’t majority filled with illegal aliens from the norther border like California’s are from the southern border. Comparing the two borders is like apples and vegetables (because oranges is too similar to be an example)
Relax, Amigo! Some of my cousins just needed work. They’ll go back eventually, or not. Have a Horchata and don’t worry so much!
 
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A law professor once told us "There are only two kinds of land. There's your land and not your land and it's up to you to know the difference."

He was adamant that neither fences nor signs were necessary for someone to be guilty of trespassing.

Cheers
It is a gray area, at least in Oregon. The Oregon law says that for hunting you are supposed to know whether hunting is allowed without signs. But that applies to "enclosed" land that has a marked boundary - e.g., a fence or marked trees, etc.

So in court (where it counts, not in a classroom), a valid defense could be that a trespasser did not know they had crossed over from public land, or private land that they had permission to hunt on, onto private land that they did not have permission to hunt on, because there was no obvious boundary. In western Oregon this would be less likely because there are a lot of fences and roads and stuff, and the plots are smaller, but it can still happen. In eastern Oregon with large plots of public and private land, it is more possible.
 
I had some guy tell me since I have “no hunting” signs on my property, that I am not allowed to hunt it either, per Oregon law. Is this right? I can’t find anything on it.

He told me it needs to say “hunting with permission only”, but I don’t want that, during general season I get multiple people a day asking anyway, as they drive by and see the deer standing 30’ off the road in my field.
Did you shove a Krispy Kreme in his face and tell him to skedaddle back to Kaliforney?

Circular firing squad
Depending on the neighborhood, we called those "Polish firing squad" or "Italian firing squad".
 

bbbass

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I don’t even plan to hunt here, when the deer come through, they hang out with the chickens, eat the fruit and just lay around. It wouldn’t be much of a hunt.

Last year, one guy was giving me a bad time for not letting him go shoot a little tiny fork, so I started making fun of him for even wanting to shoot that little thing, 20’ from the road, while it’s eating lol.
When I lived in Union OR, we had quail, pheasant, etc, that visited the yard. Now, I was a very passionate game bird hunter, but I NEVER shot any of those birds. Wouldn't let the kids do it either! Those were my guests, and I enjoyed viewing them.

But in Brookings OR, I would gladly have shot a bunch of those tiny coastal deer that kept eating all my very expensive landscape plantings and trees!!! I used to chase them away, but they all got used to me coming outside and yelling. Eventually I had to start throwing rocks at them and they wouldn't leave unless I actually hit one. Some bugger even came up 4 steps onto a raised deck to eat my wife's miniature roses!!! Bastids. Fun to watch until they eat all your plants and young trees. lol


A law professor once told us "There are only two kinds of land. There's your land and not your land and it's up to you to know the difference."

He was adamant that neither fences nor signs were necessary for someone to be guilty of trespassing.

Cheers
Hmmm, I don't remember who it was, but on a radio show it was said that all private land has a border of some kind. And those borders, mostly roads, are just as good as a fence line. No go onto somebody else's property to hunt w/o permission no matter what!!!
 
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thorborg

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You need permission from your local, state and federal sovereign before you place any signs. With eminent domain, you don't actually own the land, and with taxes, you only lease it until you can no longer pay (unless eminent domain applies) regardless of how many generations it has been in your family.. :) :(
 

jbett98

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But in Brookings OR, I would gladly have shot a bunch of those tiny coastal deer that kept eating all my very expensive landscape plantings and trees!!! I used to chase them away, but they all got used to me coming outside and yelling. Eventually I had to start throwing rocks at them and they wouldn't leave unless I actually hit one. Some bugger even came up 4 steps onto a raised deck to eat my wife's miniature roses!!! Bastids. Fun to watch until they eat all your plants and young trees. lol
I have deer that come up on my big deck - sometimes. They eat the flowers/etc.

I do not shoot any of the wildlife here - except mice/gophers. I want them to be comfortable with coming around should SHTF, in which case they will be harvested. The apple tree is starting to drop apples so they will be around that more often - they already eat the low hanging fruit.

The deer up here seem more wild than those in the city, not as used to people, more wary of coyote/cougar and dogs.
 

CRBMoA

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You need permission from your local, state and federal sovereign before you place any signs. With eminent domain, you don't actually own the land, and with taxes, you only lease it until you can no longer pay (unless eminent domain applies) regardless of how many generations it has been in your family.. :) :(
I concur with the Eminent Domain thought, although more accurately you do 'own' the land, until you don't.

But as long as land is subject to foreclosure for non-payment of taxes (as far as I know, ALL private land falls under this distinction), we do only possess land at the pleasure of the government.
 
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I concur with the Eminent Domain thought, although more accurately you do 'own' the land, until you don't.

But as long as land is subject to foreclosure for non-payment of taxes (as far as I know, ALL private land falls under this distinction), we do only possess land at the pleasure of the government.
We never owned the land. Most of it was taken, forcibly or by fraud, from the indigenous peoples, who mostly did not think of it as land that they owned, but rather, if anything, as their territory.

The land itself was then owned by the US government, and either sold/given to non-indigenous settlers.

For quite a while "landowners" could pretty much do what they wanted with their land, but since before Oregon was a state, landowners paid property tax. In the 1990s the structure of property taxes was changed and limits put on the percentages and on the valuation increases.

Zoning/etc., put limits on what could be done with land of different sorts.

Of all of the taxes that we pay, and all of the limits on what we can do, those that apply to land are the least burdensome to me and IMO. If those zoning limits were not there, my family's farm (now sold) would not still be a farm, and the land I own, would probably not still have all the trees, and would probably have multiple houses on it.
 

Gunner3456

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So the government actually owns the land and we can't do anything with it unless they say we can.

We pay rent to the government in the form of taxes.

We're just serfs who think we own land.

Got it.
 
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You can't dump toxic waste on your land, your can't drill multiple wells into the shared aquifer, on some lands you can't drain wetlands, and on some you can't create a pond. On most farm or timber land in Oregon you can't put multiple residential buildings or multi-family residences, and some farm plots you can't put a residential building at all unless the plot has a history of making $80K per year in revenue (profit?).

Most of this is geared around keeping cities within boundaries and farm/timber land as farm/timber land.
 
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