Southwest Firearms
Defensive Arts
Buster Beaver Cerakote
Gun Deals
Low Price Guns
J&B Firearm Sales
Sporting Systems
Simply Triggers
Oregon Rifleworks
HighLine Firearms
Advertise on Northwest Firearms

DLS

Messages
2,148
Reactions
3,307
I'm late to this party but what the heck.

Ditch the WD as a rust preventative ... while WD has a ton of valuable uses, as a rust inhibitor it's a very poor one at best. In fact, it can encourage rusting. It will strip any waxy or oily layer from the metal's surface leaving itself behind. You are replacing a superior rust preventative layer with an inferior one.

There are two very easy things that will solve this rust problem.

1. Quit using the steel wool! Every time you do you remove a tiny bit more of the magazine's finish allowing more rust in the future. Using steel wool results in the embedding of microscopic particles of the steel into the grain structure of the magazine body. These particles are totally "unfinished" and will begin to rust rapidly transfering the rusting action to the underlying metal.

2a. After cleaning wipe down the magazine with a small rag slightly moistened with a tiny amount of oil-based product (gun oil, CLP, Ballistol, etc.). The rag should barely feel "oily" to the touch. This will leave a dry, microscopic layer of product on the magazine body surface. This will not attract anything and actually aid in the magazine dropping free a tiny bit. If you are in a really high humidity area, like the tropics, do this as part of your daily arming ritual. Since you are already dropping the magazine every day as part of the daily arming checklist, add the quick wipe as it only takes a second or two.

Or ...

2b. Instead of wiping down the magazine with an oil-based product, buff on a layer of hard wax. Any type of hard auto or furniture finishing wax will do the job nicely and buff more easily than something like paraffin. You only have to do this after a solvent-based cleaning of the magazine body. Outside of that, the wax will last a very long time standing up too many magazine insertions and extractions. This saves the "rag wipe" mentioned above and will not attract any unwanted junk along the way. This is what I do with my magazines, and I've never had a rust problem and I've lived in some insanely humid places. I keep a Ziplock with a waxy rag in each of my safes and a couple of my workbench drawers where they are always on hand to do the quick, occasional wipe down that keeps my gear clean and rust free.

I hope this helps somebody out there!

Cheers
 

Nosferatu

Messages
1,815
Reactions
5,476
I'm late to this party but what the heck.

Ditch the WD as a rust preventative ... while WD has a ton of valuable uses, as a rust inhibitor it's a very poor one at best. In fact, it can encourage rusting. It will strip any waxy or oily layer from the metal's surface leaving itself behind. You are replacing a superior rust preventative layer with an inferior one.
For the millionth time, it was used to CLEAN only. Not once did I say it was used as a preventive.

There are two very easy things that will solve this rust problem.

1. Quit using the steel wool! Every time you do you remove a tiny bit more of the magazine's finish allowing more rust in the future. Using steel wool results in the embedding of microscopic particles of the steel into the grain structure of the magazine body. These particles are totally "unfinished" and will begin to rust rapidly transfering the rusting action to the underlying metal.
No it doesn't. This is ridiculous and completely wrong.

2a. After cleaning wipe down the magazine with a small rag slightly moistened with a tiny amount of oil-based product (gun oil, CLP, Ballistol, etc.). The rag should barely feel "oily" to the touch. This will leave a dry, microscopic layer of product on the magazine body surface. This will not attract anything and actually aid in the magazine dropping free a tiny bit. If you are in a really high humidity area, like the tropics, do this as part of your daily arming ritual. Since you are already dropping the magazine every day as part of the daily arming checklist, add the quick wipe as it only takes a second or two.

Or ...

2b. Instead of wiping down the magazine with an oil-based product, buff on a layer of hard wax. Any type of hard auto or furniture finishing wax will do the job nicely and buff more easily than something like paraffin. You only have to do this after a solvent-based cleaning of the magazine body. Outside of that, the wax will last a very long time standing up too many magazine insertions and extractions. This saves the "rag wipe" mentioned above and will not attract any unwanted junk along the way. This is what I do with my magazines, and I've never had a rust problem and I've lived in some insanely humid places. I keep a Ziplock with a waxy rag in each of my safes and a couple of my workbench drawers where they are always on hand to do the quick, occasional wipe down that keeps my gear clean and rust free.

I hope this helps somebody out there!

Cheers
Again NOT INTERESTED IN OILING AND MAINTENANCE!!

It's a moot point now, they are off being hard chromed.
 

DLS

Messages
2,148
Reactions
3,307
Wow ... chill dude! Only trying to help and ...

1. Yes, but you are complaining about rust. WD is helping your magazines to rust. Read carefully

2. Talk to any metal refinisher about steel wool embedding in the underlying material

3. Then expect your equipment to have some level of failure since all manufactured items need some level of maintenance.

4. It's not a moot point as others will read this thread as well

Cheers!

Now on to more pleasant arenas!
 

Nosferatu

Messages
1,815
Reactions
5,476
Wow ... chill dude! Only trying to help and ...

1. Yes, but you are complaining about rust. WD is helping your magazines to rust. Read carefully
Dude, You don't know much about this stuff, I'd advise you just stay out of it.

2. Talk to any metal refinisher about steel wool embedding in the underlying material
I don't need to, I worked in a Machine shop, part of what I did was surface finishing including blasting, passivation, anodizing, polishing, vapor deposition finishing, etc. I'm not a neophyte when it comes to metal finishing. You're just flat wrong, sorry.

3. Then expect your equipment to have some level of failure since all manufactured items need some level of maintenance.
That's very helpful. You're such a saint.

4. It's not a moot point as others will read this thread as well
Which is one more reason you should learn more about what you're talking about before you start spewing misinformation.
 
Messages
1,633
Reactions
3,883
Not in this case, but the same can be said of WD-40.

For these 3 mags, I'm more interested in prevention rather than maintenance. The other 365 mags can remain blued, I just want my carry mags plated.
Glad you found a plater. Sorry any of us failed to understand your stance and provided any input outside of answering your original question. Good luck with your plated magazines.

I'm out... :s0040:
 
Messages
3,570
Reactions
8,029
Nevermind. Read more of the thread and my statement was already addressed.
 
Last Edited:
Let Freedom Ring
Advertise on Northwest Firearms
Sporting Systems
Cerberus Training Group
Southwest Firearms
Copeland Custom Gunworks

Upcoming Events

Oregon Arms Collectors January Gun Show
Portland, OR
Wes Knodel Gun Shows
Chehalis, WA
Wes Knodel Gun Shows
Redmond, OR

Latest Resource Reviews

New Classified Ads

Top