Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

NFA weapons and assualt weapons ban?

Discussion in 'NFA Weapon Discussion' started by Headspace, Dec 7, 2012.

  1. Headspace

    Headspace Seattle New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    5
    A question for some of you NFA owners who were around for the last assault weapons ban. Since your guns(SBR's,SBS's,AOW's and Machine guns) are "registered NFA items", are they exempt from an assault weapons ban? Or are they affected in some other way? Something I've been chewing on since our election. Seems like it might be an expensive and round about way at keeping your stuff, but once you have them, you have them. Thanks in advance for any insight.
     
  2. Nwcid

    Nwcid Yakima and N of Spokane Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,593
    Likes Received:
    1,480
    The 1994 AWB listed by name or feature guns that were "prohibited". NFA items did not fit any of those as they are not Title 1 firearms.

    Who knows what a new ban would say or IF there will even be one.
     
  3. nrc

    nrc Oregon Member

    Messages:
    159
    Likes Received:
    19
    If the theoretical new ban specifically mentions "rifles", "shotguns", and "pistols" - then a "short barrelled rifle", "aow", or "short barreled shotgun" would be exempt because they are classified differently.

    No one knows what might happen - but the last round of national legislation ignored this class completely.
     
  4. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    5,776
    Likes Received:
    4,967
    The so called AWB

    Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, a federal law in the United States that included a prohibition on the manufacture for civilian use of certain semi-automatic firearms

    The Act addressed only semi-automatic firearms, that is, firearms that fire one shot each time the trigger is pulled. Neither the AWB nor its expiration changed the legal status of fully automatic firearms, which fire more than one round with a single trigger-pull; these have been regulated by the National Firearms Act of 1934 and Firearm Owners Protection Act of 1986.

    The Act also defined and banned 'large capacity ammunition feeding devices' in the ban, which generally applied to magazines or other ammunition feeding devices with capacities of greater than a certain number of rounds, and that up to the time of the Act were considered normal or factory magazines. Media and popular culture referred to these as 'high capacity magazines or feeding devices'. Depending on the locality and type of firearm, the cutoff between a 'normal' capacity and 'high' capacity magazine was 3, 7, 10, 12, 15, or 20 rounds. The now defunct federal ban set the limit at 10 rounds.


    During the period when the AWB was in effect, it was illegal to manufacture any firearm that met the law's flowchart of an assault weapon or large capacity ammunition feeding device, except for export or for sale to a government or law enforcement agency. The law also banned possession of illegally imported or manufactured firearms, but did not ban possession or sale of pre-existing 'assault weapons' or previously factory standard magazines that were legally redefined as large capacity ammunition feeding devices. This provision for pre-ban firearms created a higher price point in the market for such items, which still exist due to several states adopting their own assault weapons ban.


    nothing that already existed was actually banned. And since no new full auto weapons can be sold to the general public I'm not sure how this would be a work around.
     
  5. Headspace

    Headspace Seattle New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    5
    I'm moving to southern Utah and just considering investing in some NFA items. I wasn't sure if they were affected by the previous AWB. I'd imagine most legislators aren't even aware of the NFA let alone civilian owned machine guns. Thanks for the responses.
    :gun11:
     
  6. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    5,776
    Likes Received:
    4,967
    Well no new manufactured full auto after May 19, 1986 and the AWB came into effect September 13, 1994 and ran until September 13, 2004

    As the ban was on newly manufactured items or newly imported items there was no cross over between NFA full auto weapons and the semi automatic rifles listed in the AWB