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Newbie reloader. End.

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by wakejoe, Nov 7, 2008.

  1. wakejoe

    wakejoe Beaverton, OR Well-Known Member

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    Hey guys (And girls?), have a few questions.

    I want to start reloading. (Buying 1000 rounds in bulk is getting old.) .223 mostly, but some .45 ACP as well.

    I've pretty much figured out that I don't want to start off with a progressive press. (Unless someone has another opinion.) So decided I'd start with a turret-press of some kind.

    Options have been a Lee Classic Turret -
    http://www.cabelas.com/prod-1/0044122216337a.shtml

    A Lyman t-mag II "Expert" reloading kit -
    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/t...=froogle&cm_pla=0370101&cm_ite=0037524216108a


    But I'm lost. Both systems seem to have most everything I need, minus Dies. (What are "Cartridge Components" by the way?)

    Opinions on the Lee have been wonderful, relatively no negative feedback. Don't quite understand, though, how the powder would work on the Lyman. Would I have to measure manually, and dump the powder in after priming? Or just buy, for instance, the Lee Powder charge piece and screw it into one of the slots of the turret?

    I understand to read a manual, and I definitely will before loading anything into my AR. (Save 20 cents on a round, but destroy 1500 dollar rifle!) But I'd like to get answers sooner, so I posted here.

    Thank you ahead of time! :thumbup:
     
  2. lazyeye

    lazyeye Corvallis, OR Member

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    Hi Joe.
    Welcome to NWFC... you know me on AP under a different name ;)

    To answer your powder question, the Lee has the powder measure mounted onto the turret, the Lyman has a powder measure that isn't mounted (someone correct me if I'm wrong).

    For an AR, which is a hungry beast, you may want to consider a Progressive press.
     
  3. yotehunter

    yotehunter north west Active Member

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    i think you should start with a basic press and learn what loads you like and after you have gone through the basic reloading steps see if you like it and go from there make sure you learn the process before you start trying to load a couple hundred rounds a hour
     
  4. wakejoe

    wakejoe Beaverton, OR Well-Known Member

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    I do agree to start slow so I don't ruin anything. But the nagging in the back of my mind says "Why have two? Buy the better one now."

    I've heard the progressive press's are annoying and time consuming on initial setup. Any truth to that?


    I see ya', Lazyeye. (No pun there.)
    I voted ten on your Agent Smith and Jack Carver.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2008
  5. RockKrawler

    RockKrawler Gresham Member

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    After you learn the basics of handlaoding that single stage will still be very useful for small batches of test loads,resizing,depriming,etc
    I have 3 Dillons,a RCBS PB III,RCBS PB II,A Lee 1000 turret along with several single stage presses,and they all get used.
    I have also set up a complete reloading kit hat can go to the range with me for working up new loads,it consist of the Little Dandy PM,a RCBS JR.press,a 505 scale,and what ever dies i need for that particular firearm.
    Progressive presses do have alearning curve,but if you just start with a single stage and learn from there the curve is much shorter.
    If you cannot follow directions,or think you are smarter than the manufactuer,buy a single stage.
    The 1st thing you need to buy is a couple good manuals,like the Speer or Lyman,etc read them twice and then decide if you still want to reload with a progressive,semi progressive,or a single stage.
    You will need more than just a press,some bullets,primers,cases,and powder to reload.
    The Hornady LnL is a nice setup,plus you can get 500 free bullets with it's purchase.
    Dies are another hotly debated topic,it all comes down to personel preference,i have some from almost every maker,including some that are custom,they all have a place on my reloading bench.
    So what it boils down to is,what color do you like,because every company has something that will fit your learning level and wallet.
     
  6. lazyeye

    lazyeye Corvallis, OR Member

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    Perhaps we should start a reloading mentoring thread where people can volunteer to show the ropes to newbies?
     
  7. yotehunter

    yotehunter north west Active Member

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    i think that would be a great idea i reload but i learn something new everytime so it would be nice for me as well
     
  8. AndyH

    AndyH Keizer, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I second that, I am just getting started and have had mixed sucess so far.
     
  9. wakejoe

    wakejoe Beaverton, OR Well-Known Member

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    So, on a single stage, I'd put in one die. Run, say, 100 cases through it, switch the die to the next step, run the 100 cases through it, switch the die to the next step, run the cases again, etc. From re size to Bullet?
     
  10. lazyeye

    lazyeye Corvallis, OR Member

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    More or less, yes.
     
  11. KillSwitch

    KillSwitch Lake oswego New Member

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    get a eletric powder dispenser rbcs is the best, lee turret press, lee hand primer, lee hand cutters,i would go with lee on everything. I us lee and it works for me. also make sure you have a manual from every bullet maker so you can have he best idea on a starting load. If you can find data on your rifle that helps a little too. and when using a semi auto you have to make they fit into the clip so you might have to seat the bullet in further then what you get when you make your dummie from putting a bullet into a spent case then into the camber of your rifle. For my ar that im building i will get a single shot block so i can get closer to the rifleing for longer shots. pm me is you have any ?'s about lee or reloading.
     
  12. ZeroRing

    ZeroRing 26th District, WA Active Member

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    I've got an old Lyman T-mag turret press that I've had for over 20 years. The kit was a great purchase because it included everything you need (except the dies).

    If you are just starting out, a turret press is the way to go because you can get all of your dies set up for a specific caliber and then run them in batches of 50-100 or so without having to constantly remove and re-set the dies at each stage (like you would with a single stage press).

    I've never used a progressive... they look nice but I guess I tend to not do too many loads at one time and the turret has met my needs so far.

    My $0.02 for what it's worth. :thumbup:
     
  13. torpedoman

    torpedoman land of corrupt politicians Member

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    I have the lee turret (4 hole) and a electronic measure and scale that is a super set up i prime with a lee hand primer then size add powder seat bullet the next charge is ready before i am so no waiting very nice set up. the real sweet thing is once you adjust the dies and lock them in a turret you never have to do it again, just change the turret most of your reloading time is ate up adjusting and changing dies.
     
  14. ZeroRing

    ZeroRing 26th District, WA Active Member

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    Yeah, I've been debating whether or not to get a couple of spare turrets for that very reason. :thumbup:
     
  15. RockKrawler

    RockKrawler Gresham Member

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    Not to hijack this thread,but i just remembered that i have a box full of Lee 3 Hole Turret stuff...
    Will post them up in the classifieds tomorrow.

    Checked,it is the 3 hole turret press.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2008
  16. Aristotle13

    Aristotle13 Kent, WA Member

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    I'm simply offering a different perspective. So although this may contrast opinions here, please don't get offended.

    Let me preface by saying that contrary to popular belief, reloading really isn't for everyone. You have to be somewhat mechanically inclined, detail oriented, patient and have a distinct ability to keep your mind on task.

    With that said, if you do not "struggle" with the above, I know a lot of folks, including myself that started with a progressive and have not regretted it. There are some of us that learn a bit quicker, a little more mechanically inclinded and are capable of picking it up fine and still be safe.

    For someone like me, I would have quit reloading if I had learned that it takes you 4 hours to load 100 rounds. One of the primary reasons I reload is because it's economical. So if i spent that much time reloading pistol ammo, it would lose that appeal as my time is worth more than that. I can understand spending that much time for match rifle ammo, but not for pistol ammo.

    I would suggest the best way to find out is to have someone allow you to "shadow" them during a reload session and find out for yourself. You may find that it's not exactly rocket science and is something that it is something totally within your "comfort" zone. Or you may learn, that yeah, you may be better off starting slow. There are definitely some key things to watch out for. The most important thing is setting up a repeatable and stringent "process" of checks and balances. And to have a good electronic scale and calipers and some reloading books.
     
  17. wakejoe

    wakejoe Beaverton, OR Well-Known Member

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    Well, I drove up to Cabela's, just north of Olympia last night, picked up 350 dollars of stuff. :D (Including a couple stainless 1911 mags.)

    Got a Lee Classic Turret, and everything to go with. (Dies, Factory Crimp die..) Primer feed, extension for the charge die. Scales and the works.

    Should have my new mini-bench setup tonight so I can (Maybe?) pump out a round or two before bed. Anything I should watch out for during setup, that anyone can think of?
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2008
  18. Wallygator

    Wallygator Albany, OR Active Member

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    Congrats! Now we need pictures, (or it didn't happen). ;)
     
  19. Oohrah

    Oohrah NorthwestSouthern Oregon Coast Member

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    Was going to tell you that scales most important and that you
    check loads of powder measure, dipper, or what ever method
    you use to throw powder. Some check every so often that
    charges thrown are accurate. I check each with the scale.
    Especially toward the max end of some loads. I prep all my
    cases, clean if needed (walnut), size, clean (corn) again with finer
    grit, prime, and load them up. I get by with a progressive with
    the shotgun press. Find I like the single stage better, with less
    chance for error and equally as fast I think. Not about speed, but
    it needs to be consistant in all stages.
     
  20. RockKrawler

    RockKrawler Gresham Member

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    Just curious,but if a scale is so important as you say,then why don't BR shooters use one?
    Most BR guys i know just throw a load using a powder measurer,they are accurate enough for them
    A .1 or .2 gr difference is not going to matter in a rifle load,case prep,primers,and projectiles are much more important.
    I agree that someone should pick an arbitrary number of loads and measure it out just to be safe so as to help eliminate squib loads or loads that may be heavy especially if you are using a progressive press.
    Something i have yet to see anyone mention,but when using a progressive or semi progressive press you want to train yourself to use the same motion with the same amount of force on each stroke of the handle.
    Reasoning for this is more consistent powder drops due to equal vibration on the press and mounting surface.
    Always remember to drop a load 10% and work up from there,if you change ANY component of your load you will once again need to start low and work your way up again.
    Try to buy your primers,bullets,and powder with the same lot number to keep from having to rework up any proven or sweet loads.
    Just because someone has a load that works in their rifle/handgun does not mean it will work or be safe in yours.
    There is more,but i am tired.