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While this thread may provide some useful knowledge, tips, and answers, IMO it is best to consider firearms ownership and use as a lifelong venture. Time in grade will allow sifting the wheat from the chaf.

Hang out with good, sane, safe, sober, moral, shooters and gun owners at clubs/range/gunstore. Garbage in, garbage out is what to be wary of...
 
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Love that tractor, me!
That's my old Ford 8N. It's almost as old as I am, but it starts first time, every time. It illustrates the debris forks I built for it that clamp onto the lower edge of the loader bucket. Built for $50 in materials versus buying same for $400.

Last Spring I added power steering to it. I had to make parts and tools for this job.

TractorStrippedSystem.jpg
Tractor20213.jpg
Tractor20214.jpg
 
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Why not 4 times? Why not 6? Why not 23 for that matter
You rack it more than 1 time in the event you forget to drop the mag. If you rack only one time and have a loaded mag without one chambered you would have effectively loaded the firearm. I chose to rack the firearm 5 times to ensure it is clear. Want to rack more feel free
 
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Every firearm should be treated as if it's loaded. If someone hands you a firearm. you should check to see if it's clear and unloaded, even if the person who handed it to you just did it and you saw him do it! Never -- never point a firearm at another person and never use your scope as a binocular!
 
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Whenever possible ask specific questions regarding the information that you want.

I know a fair bit about muzzle loaders and its easy to overwhelm someone with way too much information , in regards to general questions or the dreaded : "What is the best..." type of question. :eek: :D
Andy
As a qualified instructor of instructors, we had a simple message to be taken to heart when answering a question.

When you've answered what was asked, stop answering.

Add a question instead - 'Does that answer your question?'
 
As a qualified instructor of instructors, we had a simple message to be taken to heart when answering a question.

When you've answered what was asked, stop answering.

Add a question instead - 'Does that answer your question?'
That approach is fine for many subjects or situations. But not with safety related subjects where the question or the questioners actions show that he doesn't know other things he needs to know in order to operate safely, and if you answer just the immediate question you mislead the questioner into thing he's now good to go. And he or others could die if he thinks he's good to go if he isnt.
 
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That approach is fine for many subjects or situations. But not with safety related subjects where the question or the questioners actions show that he doesn't know other things he needs to know in order to operate safely, and if you answer just the immediate question you mislead the questioner into thing he's now good to go. And he or others could die if he thinks he's good to go if he isnt.
Perhaps I ought to have prefaced my comment with your words, since I was talking about academic subjects.

Having taught firearms handling in the military as part of our continuation upgrade training, starting with my first year in the TA infantry [a place of hard knocks for screwing up even slightly], I can attest that teaching people either singly or in groups, as we did, relies heavily on the carrying out of repetitive tasks until they become muscle memory. It takes around 30 hours of deeply involving training to make an infantry soldier utterly familiar with his personal weapon - something that nevertheless continues throughout his or her service career with every weapon that he is taught to use. The continuous TOETs - tests of elementary training - never cease. Even as a major I fully engaged in strip and assembly competitions with others with every weapon that I had ever been trained to use.

None of this applies in Civvie Street - kicking a trainee in the nether regions for failing to apply his safety catch before removing the magazine is frowned on these days. How many here were taught the mantra - Apply safety catch! Mag off! Cock, hook and look! ?

As a club instructor, I have to rely on the common sense of the probationary member, who will only be allowed to handle a firearm after the compulsory one day familiarisation course required of all new members. In a country where shooting is a privilege that must be paid for, In the last forty-something years of club instructing I've never encountered a prima donna where gun-handling is concerned. They are told that one safety screw-up, and they are likely to be history. That also goes for long-time members, too. I only know, second-hand, of one person who broke the rules and having been reminded of them, did what HE wanted to do. He was suspended on the spot, lost his club membership, and had to have a radical rethink about his shooting future, which was about to be cut short for ever.

Lose your club membership here in UK, and bang goes your rationale for gun ownership - IF you are a target shooter. It seems the the miscreant was also a deer stalker - UK-speak for deer-hunter - and did not need to be a club member. However, his game license was suspended pending investigations by the firearms licensing department, and they, taking advice from others, revoked his FAC.
 
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I frequently shoot with iron sights. So my advice to a newbie with iron sights is.......

Move the rear sight......in the direction of where you want the bullet strikes to move.
Move the front sight......where the bullet strikes are currently occurring.

Aloha, Mark
 
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Since we weren't told the parameters of this mythical person's training (Good or Bad), prior experience level, history, etc.....etc.....

Perhaps, this sort of advice from Colion Noir is more open-ended (and/or will cover more territory) for someone new to firearms.



Aloha, Mark
 
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There is a lot of good advice above.

On a different topic, and not as important as the safety advice above; don’t buy too much too fast. Don’t spend your money on something because You Tube personalities portray it as cool or the latest and greatest gadget.

Get professional training. Not some person who thinks they are an expert but don’t have a thorough background using firearms for serious purposes. I recommend Steve Shields at Cerberus.

Get some secure storage options.
what would you say would be a good "starter" list? I got a larger EDC, a small conceal carry, and getting: belt, holster, light and red dot optic for the EDC and 3 types of ammo: practice rounds, hallow point and also a higher powered "wild life" stopping (hopefully) rounds (few of them only). Also ordered 2 extra magazines that are more than 10 capacity so I will have 4 for each and in case measure 114 passes. Thoughts? Also taking a class this weekend.
 
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All good, just a slight addition pertaining to possible hang fires. Keep the gun pointed in a safe direction while waiting 10 - 15 seconds before extracting / ejecting the questionable round and tossing it.

On the same note, many years ago a friend had a number of .38 special rounds fail to fire in his police surplus S&W model 10. What's he do? He brings them home, paints the heads with nail polish to identify them and proceeds to use them as snap caps.
So... what could possibly go wrong? Well at least he was aiming at the dart board and not the TV... So... one 158 gr rnl thru the dart board, the wall and into the dirt bank on the other side of the lawn. Thankfully there weren't any kids playing on the lawn...

Than there was the other idiot I knew that put a .44 mag round thru his roommates brand new top of the line TV that he couldn't afford to replace.

If your going to dryfire (good practice) Make sure the gun is empty, than recheck it and make sure your dryfire practice is in a safe direction.
When ever I've had a Com Bloc 7.62x39 not go off the first time, it always did the second time. Your friend is crazy! :(
 
what would you say would be a good "starter" list? I got a larger EDC, a small conceal carry, and getting: belt, holster, light and red dot optic for the EDC and 3 types of ammo: practice rounds, hallow point and also a higher powered "wild life" stopping (hopefully) rounds (few of them only). Also ordered 2 extra magazines that are more than 10 capacity so I will have 4 for each and in case measure 114 passes. Thoughts? Also taking a class this weekend.
I don't know how good/bad your eyes are, but before I would put a RDS on an EDC, I'd learn to shoot it with just the irons.
Yeah, there's a lot to be said in favor of RDSs. But IMHO, there's even more to be said for being able to shoot accurately and reliably with irons.
 
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1) Get training, contact the NRA for instructors.
2) Join a gun club for regular practice, otherwise much of your training will be forgotten in 9 months if you don't.

Guns are the hardware, marksmanship is the software.
 

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