Messages
1,521
Reactions
3,061
risked a trip to N Portland to pick up my new 33 layer Damascus steel Gyuto kitchen knife
more a work of art than a utility knife
while I was there, I dropped off my 40 year old Chicago Cutlery 10" 44S kitchen knife to have the nicks taken out of the blade
several of the customers in the shop (Seisuke Knife) came over to look at it
they had hear of this old American classic, but none had ever seen one
the knife was older than any one in the shop
I've personally used this knife in my kitchen for 40 years - longer than I've been married

20220620_181251.jpg 20220620_181302.jpg 20220620_181353.jpg 20220619_220228_009.jpg
 
Messages
1,521
Reactions
3,061
I don't know how many of you use Japanese steel knives, I recently found they take different care tools
my ceramic sticks are 1500 grit, for Japanese steel knives, one needs special Japanese ceramic with 3000 grit
have one on order
and I'm told to never use a steel or diamond honing sticks on Japanese steel, they can chip the harder Japanese knives
 

Siglvr

Messages
1,885
Reactions
2,682
Another thing to pay attention to, and most of us Americans don't know this, but some of those amazing Japanese Knife blades can come left or right handed in addition to symmetrical. The blade grind is different, and if you aren't paying attention and sharpen it like a regular knife blade, you'll mess up the blades intention. See diagram below.

Japanese_grinds.png


I've bought my wife some Japanese knives, and have some Old Chicago ones that were left in the trash at a rental house. Those carbon blades rust easy, and someone likely got tired of it as they were pretty rusty. I steelwooled them, linseed oiled the handles and sharpened them and they are super usable and will last another hundred years if it's continued. A light coat of oil (olive or vegetable) when you are storing them will keep the rust at bay.
 
Messages
1,521
Reactions
3,061
Another thing to pay attention to, and most of us Americans don't know this, but some of those amazing Japanese Knife blades can come left or right handed in addition to symmetrical. The blade grind is different, and if you aren't paying attention and sharpen it like a regular knife blade, you'll mess up the blades intention. See diagram below.

View attachment 1226508


I've bought my wife some Japanese knives, and have some Old Chicago ones that were left in the trash at a rental house. Those carbon blades rust easy, and someone likely got tired of it as they were pretty rusty. I steelwooled them, linseed oiled the handles and sharpened them and they are super usable and will last another hundred years if it's continued. A light coat of oil (olive or vegetable) when you are storing them will keep the rust at bay.
the original American made Chicago Cutlery were 440C stainless steel
maybe you found some of the later Chinese ones
 
Messages
1,521
Reactions
3,061
80 + years of Chicago cutlery will include carbon steel, various "stainless ", and current imported versions.

Everyone's correct!
I can only say after 40 years in my kitchens, used and abused by my wife, often left in the bottom of the sink overnight, not a spec of rust on my 44S
she even tried to pry frozen porkchops apart once and bent the tip - I put it in my big vise and over 30 min, slowly bend it back into shape

20220619_220228_009.jpg
 
Messages
1,521
Reactions
3,061
I can only say after 40 years in my kitchens, used and abused by my wife, often left in the bottom of the sink overnight, not a spec of rust on my 44S
she even tried to pry frozen porkchops apart once and bent the tip - I put it in my big vise and over 30 min, slowly bend it back into shape

View attachment 1226572
but knobgoblin is correct, Chicago Cutlery made many lines of knives
mine just happens to be stamped 440C stainless steel of the Walnut Traditional Line
until this week when I acquired my Gyuto, it has been my main kitchen knife
 

Upcoming Events

Rimfire Challenge
Canby, OR
Wes Knodel Gun Shows
Chehalis, WA

Latest Resource Reviews

New Classified Ads

Back Top