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NERF toy guns

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by Dyjital, Mar 22, 2010.

  1. Dyjital

    Dyjital Albany, Ore Flavorite Member Bronze Supporter

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    I have serious mixed opinions about my boys with the NERF toy guns shooting those little darts at each other.

    11 and 4-1/2. They have fun but I'm wondering to myself.. if they do this with the NERF guns what's to stop them from doing it with a real gun later in life when they are just 'playing'.

    There's no second chances with real guns or ammo.

    Guns @ home here a under lock and key or in my possession. I'm more concerned about them getting into something at a friends house where possibly the friend cannot distinguish between real and toy.


    Considering throwing out the toy guns all together but what kind of a childhood would that be.


    Thoughts?
     
  2. 56kninja

    56kninja Portland Member

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    Well. I really can't speak to this, but I can assure you that it's a rational fear.


    Same with Airsoft as a sport. Kids running around in tactical rigs with realistic looking automatic BB guns.
     
  3. theflyguy

    theflyguy Beaverton, Oregon Member

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    Personally I don't see a problem.

    When I was a kid...if I can remember back that far, I use to play with gun figures I would make out of wood and would shoot rubber bands; use to play army with other kids in the neighborhood.

    I learned my respect for firearms from my dad. He taught me how to handle, never to point, when/where to shoot, proper handling/storage, etc...things every parent should teach IMHO.

    When I got old enough he took me hunting (dove/quail). I learned from dad all the right things. As soon as I turned 16 dad took me to my gun safety class and then shopping for my first shotgun. Over the years I learned an honest respect for firearms...but then again I wasn't exposed to all the "shootem up games" where it's ok to kill, kill, kill.

    Just my .02 cents opinion
     
  4. smithmax

    smithmax here Member

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    I don't see the Nerf guns as a problem, because they don't look anything like a "real" gun.
     
  5. glockfan

    glockfan North of Cottage Grove Member

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    Education?

    Seriously, do your kids had a learning disability? If not, then the responsibility lies with YOU to educate them about firearms.
     
  6. Texan

    Texan Oregon Member

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    Not a problem in my house either. My boys, 6 and 12, both have NERF and Airsoft guns. I've also taught both of them to treat every gun as if it is loaded, even the NERF and Airsoft guns. I don't hesitate to show either of them my real firearms anytime they ask and I teach them about safety while showing them. My oldest passed Hunter's Safety at 9 and impresses me still every time we go out.

    I think it is up to the parents to teach kids and you can teach them to be safe. I am sure they are curious about other firearms, but I have taught them safety and they know they can see our firearms anytime they ask.

    Even if they didn't have NERF guns at home, what's to stop them from 'playing' with a real firearm away from home? Teach them safety and don't be afraid to show them how things work.
     
  7. Dyjital

    Dyjital Albany, Ore Flavorite Member Bronze Supporter

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    Negative. Both of my boys are too smart for their own good.

    Completely agree that safety falls on the parents for instruction. I have no issues with that.
     
  8. xjjeeper223

    xjjeeper223 Medford Active Member

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    I grew up with NERF and then Airsoft and even "Shoot 'em up" video games. I have yet to shoot anyone, accidentally or otherwise... I think NERF guns and similar toys are an excellent way to teach safe and responsible firearms handling skills at a young age.
     
  9. cbzdel

    cbzdel Tacoma, WA Member

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    I grew up with nerf guns and super soakers, the moved onto bb guns and paint ball guns. Shot other kids with each of them (yes even BBs we were stupid kids haha) we even had BB pistols that looked just like real guns and we would play cops and robbers out in the woods. And I love movies and video games with lots of shooting and graphic blood and gore :)

    Now I am 25 and have no desire to shoot anyone with a real gun, nor have I ever. And I was not raised in a gun toting family, my mother & father and not exactly anti-gun but they never had interest in them and didnt allow me to have a real gun under their roof. First thing I did when I moved out was buy a gun haha! My mom now shows interest and goes to the range with me. My dad still says hes not against it just not into it.
     
  10. Kimber Custom

    Kimber Custom Vancouver, WA Bronze Vendor Bronze Vendor

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    I understand the dilemma; my two girls enjoy 'boy' toys like guns & swords. Squirt guns are another problem since the purpose is to get each other wet. Where do you draw the line?

    On the other hand; it's this kind of extremism that has made the schools take a 'zero tolerance' stance to include GI Joe plastic guns.

    I also have to agree with xjjeeper that I grew up with realistic toy guns stalking around the neighborhood playing army without ever turning a real gun on someone out of play habbit.

    I took the lessons of firearm safty to heart enough that I have nothing to add to the AD/UD/ND thread depite daily handling of a firearm for over 12 years.

    I guess I lean toward toy guns are just that: toys. Take advantage of the teachable moments as they come up and stress the difference between a toy and what we do with a real gun.

    I also think a live demonstration of what a .45 can do to a melon is a dramatic answer to that oh so familiar question 'why'.

    my .02
     
  11. Backwoods

    Backwoods Middle of no where... Member

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    I grew up without any guns in my house, but I was always told to leave them alone. My neighbor/friends dad (with my parents permission) taught me to care for guns and too shoot. There was never a question in my mind on how a gun was to be handled and used. I think the biggest thing for me was the constant reminders as I was taught on safe handling. Some of my friends now think I am a little to cautious but I think if it hasn't (catching my 13 year old brother-in-law thinking his rifle was unloaded when it was not after a day of hunting) it will save a life.
     
  12. 56kninja

    56kninja Portland Member

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    I don't think you can be too safe when it comes to guns.

    Too many stupid accidents that kill or maim by people that weren't safe.
     
  13. Dyjital

    Dyjital Albany, Ore Flavorite Member Bronze Supporter

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    Everyone: Appreciate the input.

    I don't think of myself as an extremist. I grew up having toys and guns in my closet. From as early as I can remember. 22's, BB's and my 30-06 that was won in a raffle before I was born.

    I think I'm going to schedule a demonstration soon as the fruit becomes available.

    I did show my son (the 11 year old) the .45 to the foot photos as a real example of what happens. I think he got the message.

    I guess I got carried away at "whats the limit". I am not like schools with a zero tolerance. I'm better than that.

    I really do appreciate the input though, I really have a lot of respect for everyone on the board. There's a LOT of experience here, and I mean practical and useful experience.
     
  14. FlyGuy

    FlyGuy Portland, OR Member

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    I personally dont see a problem with it. Just make sure you make it clear to them what guns are and that nerf guns are just toys and yours are certainly not.
     
  15. Trick

    Trick St Helens Active Member

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    My three boys all had bb guns, nerf guns, squirt guns and the such. The two oldest have been through hunters safety and have harvested a few deer now. As a parent it always seemed like a natural progression to start them out with toys guns and move them on up. Funny thing was I started instructing them on gun safety even with the toy guns....not to the point where they couldn't shoot each other with squirt guns, but reminding them of the difference between toys and the real deal.

    Don't look at toy guns as a problem....look at them as an early opportunity to begin gun safety education.
     
  16. MarkSBG

    MarkSBG Beaverton Oregon Well-Known Member

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    If nothing else, giving your kids toy guns teaches them bad gun handling habits that you will have to train out later. When they handle a real gun, it will be hard for them not to put their finger into the trigger guard immediately and that sort of thing.

    Just my 0.02
     
  17. country boy

    country boy portland area Member

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    Well, I used dart guns and squirt guns as a kid (actually I still do sometimes:D) but my father always differentiated between the toy guns we were using and the real thing. I was taught gun safety and how to shoot on an old daisy pump bb gun which he always made me treat like a deadly weapon (which it was...for birds and squirrels). I guess my point is, as long as you differentiate between toys and the real thing it should be ok. Just my :twocents:
     
  18. STNOSU

    STNOSU Corvallis Member

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    I have a 4 yr old and he has a good collection of Nerf guns and various other toy guns. He knows the difference between the two, when he got his first one we sat down and had the whole if you had a real one and shot someone what would happen. Basically we broke it down what would happen if his mother or I would get shot and it was kind of dickish since he started crying but it scared him straight. He wont touch the real guns and tells us he only shoots his toy guns. He likes to go out with us when we go shooting but wont go near the real guns, though hes good at picking up our brass lol.
     
  19. turq

    turq Molino,oregon Member

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    Every time I see Air Soft guns being sold/displayed, I ask the clerk not to offer them up in 'their' store. It is stupid to let kids play with a realistic looking GUN. First training with single shot 22lr then more with other rifles/shotguns; then at say 18yr old handguns.
    How would you feel if your kid(?) pointed one at a police officer and was shot dead?
    That orange tip is a magic marker away from being black.

    This is not even taking into considering the felons that shove these into a clerks' face in a robbery.
     
  20. NK777

    NK777 West of Portland Member

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    I grew up with squirt guns, hand made rubber band guns, cap guns, and sticks wittled into gun shapes. My father had guns in the house. I had hunters safety at a young age. So you'd think I'd be in full support of toy guns but not really. I decided instead of toy guns I would buy the kids BB guns and treat them like real guns. I agree that toy guns teach poor gun handling habits which I suppose is okay when you reinforce the difference between toys and real guns... I don't know though. Kids have much shorter attention spans and are more prone to a lapse in good judgement. All of my kids (ages 6 to 16 years old) have been instructed on safe gun handling by me. They all have fired BB guns and realguns. They know the difference but also understand a BB gun is not to be treated as a toy. When your 6 year old after firing her BB gun puts the safety on and sets it down it makes you feel really good inside. All guns to include BB guns are locked up when not in use in the guns safe. Only 3 people in the house have access to the gun safe (Myself, Wife, and our 16 year old). Soon when I feel she is truely ready I will allow my 14 year old access to the safe but at the moment I'm not certain she's quite ready. Understand that my 14 and 16 year old are step kids, are a bit more troubled then my own, and I probably have a little harder time trusting them as much as my own flesh and blood. Additionally they had zero positive gun expossure before I came into the picture. I love shooting with them all, unfortunately they are not nearly as interested in shooting as I am. I am very pleased that they all practice safe gun handling proceedures.

    It is your job as a parent to teach your kids. How, when, where, you teach them is entirely up to you. Many methods work, decide how you want to approuch it and do it. You do not do them any favors by keeping them ignorant.