Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Need some thoughts on "Studless" Tires

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Navman, Nov 2, 2013.

  1. Navman

    Navman Canby Oregon Active Member

    Messages:
    290
    Likes Received:
    157
    Need tires on my Wife's MDX

    Want something year round but better in winter.

    She's always driven Michilean's great for summer but not so much snow.

    I know nothing about wear, handling & traction of studless tires or brands

    Over & out, Navman
     
  2. simon99

    simon99 Central Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,673
    Likes Received:
    1,673
    I'm originally from Alaska and grew up as a ski racer in Western Washington, now live in the High Desert of Oregon....so I've seen plenty of winter roads. I always suggest looking at a really good all-season radial tire. I've tried Bridgestone Blizzack tires and some others and really can't see a huge advantage considering the extra cost. A big part of the equation is driving ability, type of vehicle and practice in winter driving conditions.

    Just my opinion....all the best.
     
  3. Navman

    Navman Canby Oregon Active Member

    Messages:
    290
    Likes Received:
    157
    Thank you Simon, same here, not Alaska but I learned how to drive on a frozen lake in Northern Michigan.

    Back then it was studded tires or summer tires, even now I have winter studded tires mounted on rims for my Dodge 4x4

    Friend has the same truck with studless and swears by them.

    Edit: looks like michelin does make studless called x-ice xi3 little spendy though
     
  4. 1200bruce

    1200bruce Port Angeles WA Active Member

    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    38
    X-Ice all the way, they blew my mind when I put them on.
     
  5. Nutty4Guns

    Nutty4Guns Portland ADHD Superstar

    Messages:
    1,011
    Likes Received:
    436
    Studless winter tires are great, but it would be rather costly to use them year round since they wear faster than all season tires.
     
  6. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,261
    Likes Received:
    3,074
    30+ years driving in Central Oregon and I never had either studded tires or specific non-studded tires. The answer - GOOD all season tires or aggressive traction style, additional weight in the rear of your pickup or front wheel drive car and drive SENSIBLY with extra distance between you and the vehicle in front of you. Most accidents in winter are not 'tire' related but are due to lack of experience, excessive speed or overconfidence with SUVs or pickups - which account for most that wind up on their roof between LaPine and Bend in the winter.
     
  7. drew

    drew OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,052
    Likes Received:
    970
    This is what I do with my 4x4 vehicles. I do like the studless tires on cars because they work well. Can't think of anything better on ice.

    I also agree with the inexperience being a major contributing factor. I've watched a couple AWD/4x4 pass me only to spin off the road later. I've stopped and offered a tow strap if it looked possible for me to help.
     
  8. Salps

    Salps Down by the river…. Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    433
    Likes Received:
    315
  9. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,261
    Likes Received:
    3,074
    AND speed - two quick stories - a couple years ago I was driving into Bend when an idiot passed me on the snow somewhere near Sunriver. I 'passed' him just South of Bend a few minutes later when he was piled up into a temporary concrete road barricade. Another one - I was heading home one afternoon and I saw a guy start to move into the left lane to passe me and as he neared passing distance I saw him from my rearview mirror slide sideways and he stayed this way, sliding for about 100 yards until he started to straighten out - but not enough and he went right off the road into the snowbank off the road.
     
  10. drew

    drew OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,052
    Likes Received:
    970
    True. I just think people are driving fast due to inexperience. Either that or they're a jackass.
     
  11. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    5,774
    Likes Received:
    4,964
    Walk into a Les Schwab tire store and ask to talk to an experienced salesman. I doubt anyone has more experience with what kind of tire works in winter conditions then the guys who sell them every winter.
     
  12. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,261
    Likes Received:
    3,074
    No, most who drive too fast are oblivious to the reality of the danger. Maybe they think they have an invisible force field around them and believe it will never happen 'to them' When it does though it will no doubt be someone or something Else's fault. Speed and stopping distance are the two biggest factors in winter driving accidents. Heck I need to get out and familiarize myself with my new Jeep and slick driving conditions but I think a wood box with about 200 lbs of rocks will be in the bed of it soon.
     
  13. powermad

    powermad Portland Active Member

    Messages:
    248
    Likes Received:
    77
    I see no need for studded tires at all, especially for this area.
    They are a waste of money IMO.

    You would be better served with a good all season tire and a good set of chains.
    It's been probably 10 years since I had to throw chains on a rig for this area and that was due to an ice storm.
    It is far easier to throw iron when needed than to put on studs for when the big one hits that never does. Then drive around on dry pavement with studs for weeks after the big one that never happened is over because swapping 4 wheels is a PITA for most people.
    Chains take up far less space than 4 wheels also and are just a bit cheaper.
    Of course you will have to actually get out of the rig and physically put them on when needed. So being prepared for that is something to consider.
    If I throw chains in the trunk I also toss in a set of gloves, coveralls and a semi mudflap to kneel on.
    Knowing how to throw iron is helpful too, you may want to practice a few times when it's nice out.
    Jack up a wheel, put on a set and make sure they are snug and secure.
    Sloppy fitting chains do you no good and they tear things up.

    Now days if I think I have to chain up I just stay home.
    I can drive just fine. Others not so much.
    This area has the biggest bunch of morons when the snow starts to fall or it ices up.
    Driving 2 miles an hour with just a bit of spitting snow, chains flapping and tearing up the fenders.
    Or blasting past you because they have a 4x4 with the alter physics button engaged and it malfunctions and the wind up on their lid.
    I just shake my head and drive on after seeing that everyone is OK.
    I don't pull anyone out either, if you are in the ditch maybe it should just stay there till it warms up. Usually the next day.
    Obviously winter driving is not your forte and the best place for the rig is parked where it is and not a menace to others.

    I dunno, I grew up where the roads still had ice on them almost up to summer break for school. No one had studs and few chained up.
    No such thing as a snow day either. If that was the case there would be no school at all.
     
    simon99 and (deleted member) like this.
  14. simon99

    simon99 Central Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,673
    Likes Received:
    1,673
    Great advice and thoughts...I agree 100%

    I also carry a nylon pull strap. Never had to use it for my rig, but have pulled dozens of others out of snow banks and ditches with it.
     
  15. PBinWA

    PBinWA Clark County Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,092
    Likes Received:
    359
    I have a steep paved road that ices up a lot in the winter. Studs make all the difference. Otherwise, you have to get out and chain-up for the last mile home which got old fast. If it wasn't for this hill, I wouldn't need the studs.
     
  16. powermad

    powermad Portland Active Member

    Messages:
    248
    Likes Received:
    77
    Ah, I had that problem at one place I lived at. Got tired of throwing iron to go 100 yards and just left a 3 wheeler at the bottom.
     
  17. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,261
    Likes Received:
    3,074
    Chain use should be extremely regulated if not banned entirely for non-commercial use. I used to drive over 58 and 20/22 regularly, all year and would regularly drive past people (in my Toyota with average tires) who were 'chaining up'. I see people driving through Bend with 2" (or less) of snow on the ground with chains on. Again, 30 + years of Central Oregon driving and along with never having studded tires I also never have had chains. Like I said, good tires, weight in the rear for a pickup or front wheel driver cars, experience, reduced speed and increased stopping distance are what keep you safe and wheels down.
     
  18. powermad

    powermad Portland Active Member

    Messages:
    248
    Likes Received:
    77
    The last time I chained up was the last ice storm and I needed to go over the St. Johns bridge.
    The last time I had attempted that was in a 91 Mustang and I went down it sideways.
    Tight posi rear ends suck on slick roads.
    But at least I was pointed in the right direction when I got to the bottom and I just had to blip the throttle to keep on going.
     
  19. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,674
    Likes Received:
    4,849
    IMO users of studded tires should have to pay thru the nose for road repairs. Never had or needed them
     
    the4thshake and (deleted member) like this.
  20. 308

    308 ΜOΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ ΜOΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ Platinum Supporter Silver Supporter

    Messages:
    3,300
    Likes Received:
    6,581