Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Need concrete repairs in Portland. Ideas?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by teflon97239, Oct 12, 2011.

  1. teflon97239

    teflon97239 Portland, OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,057
    Likes Received:
    3,371
    I have some pretty substantial outdoor drainage and concrete issues to resolve around my home. Everything is on a hill (adding a bit of urgency to the equation after that poor guy slid down onto Terwilliger Blvd. a couple years ago).

    - Steep driveway with erosion and hollow spots underneath.
    - Slab under an add-on room drifting away from the main foundation.

    Having heard horror stories about half-*ssed jobs, abandoned projects and threats of property liens from cement providers, I'm more than a little hesitant to just start dialing random numbers from the yellow pages or internet.

    I'm hoping to get a handful of estimates to compare, but it seems everyone is hunting, specialized/commercial only, unavailable make an estimate after work, or unable to operate a telephone. Very frustrating. Anyone here know of a reliable, honest Portland area outfit with verifiable references?

    Thought of trying Angies list because a competent job would certainly be worth whatever the subscription costs. But I've never spoken to ANYONE who's used the service.

    Open to ideas, thanks in advance.
     
  2. Just Jim

    Just Jim Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,828
    Likes Received:
    6,266
    Sounds like you have a problem on where the house was built rather than a concrete problem. If your slab is moveing then you have subsurface issues, hope you have lots of money to tackle the problem.

    jj
     
  3. Just Jim

    Just Jim Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,828
    Likes Received:
    6,266
    If I was determined to stay there then I would have a well driller come out and sink some holes deep enough that when filled with concrete is would stop the ground movement. Your ground moves due to water saturation so one of those holes should have a pump to pump out water build up to keep area dry as possible.

    Still this may not help as your house may have been built on a natural spring.

    Good luck.

    jj
     
  4. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,109
    Likes Received:
    835
    If you can afford it, hire a civil engineer to design some drainage. If not, then I AM NOT AN ENGINEER.

    However, if it was up to me, I'd dig a deep ditch all the way around the property perimeter - as deep as my excavator would reach. I'd make sure the bottom had a slight slope toward the street.

    Next I'd line the ditch clear to the top with some perforated cloth just like they put under roads. Ask your concrete supplier. Next I'd put about 8" of drain rock (pea gravel or 1" drain rock) in the bottom and lay 4" sch. 40 perforated pipe in it, right on the gravel.

    Now I'd fill the ditch about 1/2 way up with more drain rock and then install another identical perf pipe. be sure the pipes and ditch have slope to carry water to the street. I'd want 1" slope in 4 feet of run. Now I'd fill the ditch to about 6" from the top with more drain rock, fold the geo cloth over to seal dirt out of the gravel and pipes, and then put dirt on the top. Get this - all of the ditch is lined, and all of the rock and pipes are sealed in with that cloth. The dirt on top would be very porous to let ground water drop into the ditch. I'd probably mix native soil and compost 50/50 for that, or just use potting soil.

    That should allow your ground to dry out and stay dry. I'd let the ground dry out and settle clear into next summer before I repaired concrete.

    If you just repair your concrete now without fixing the drainage, it will just move again.

    PS Don't forget to "call before you dig" so your liability is covered for utilities. Your excavating contractor will do that, I'd think.
     
  5. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    6,469
    Likes Received:
    7,689
    "Slab under an add-on room drifting away from the main foundation".

    Sounds like whoever built the addition could have blocked the original drainage and or didn't put one under the new work. Unless it was a bootleg job with no city permits, there should be a record at the planning center that shows who,what and where this addition occurred.
    As far as that Terwilliger house problem goes, it all came back to the homeowner putting in an illegal irrigation system with no permit and using migrant laborers, who cut the main foundation drains and than blocked them on the uphill side. Insurance company refused to pay, citing the homeowner policy does not cover soil movement.