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Need a barrel fluted

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by Frankenrifle, May 6, 2014.

  1. Frankenrifle

    Frankenrifle Clatskanie Active Member

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    Does anyone have a resource to get a heavy barrel turned down into a fluted one? I like the benefits of the heavy, but want to drop some weight without compromising it.
     
  2. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    It is generally not considered a good idea to flute a barrel after it is finished. As the process can easily induce a warp. Or so I have been told by a number of gunsmiths.
     
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  3. Grizzly_A

    Grizzly_A Portland Metro Area Member

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    Are you wanting it turned down (reduce diameter) AND fluted, or just fluted lengthwise keeping the same outside diameter?
     
  4. JayDub

    JayDub I got your 6 Member

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    Frankenrifle likes this.
  5. Frankenrifle

    Frankenrifle Clatskanie Active Member

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    I bought a heavy barrel for a .22 and it alone weighs more than the rest of the rifle plus the stock. I want less barrel to cut down on weight or I'll have to put it in a wood stock to get it balanced up proper. The barrel makes it a tack driver but it's very awkward to use.
     
  6. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    As Mark was alluding to,if you flute it after it is bored,then you will change the barrel dynamics. I believe they flute and shape the barrel THEN drill the bore.
    If you heat up the barrel after the rifling,you may change the whole thing.
     
  7. eganx

    eganx Kingston WA Active Member

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    So the machining process imparts stress upon the metal being machined. There is internal stress in the metal as well, which, when machined, is released. This release of stress can bend the barrel, make the bore out of round, etc. I, being a machinist, would not flute a barrel already drilled and rifled and expect to get a tack driver. There is just too much material being removed to no have something shift or move on ya. Thats my 2 cents, which is over priced at that.
     
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  8. Nickb

    Nickb Moxee Active Member

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    Material can and does move around a lot when it's cut.
    If you're set on reducing weight, have a pro do it that will stand behind their work.
     
  9. jluck

    jluck Really,Really, Close to Newport Oregon 97365 Voted #1 Member

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    I have wrestled with this notion too. From the research I have done, the people who change barrels for a living say "bad idea, I'll just rebarrel it for you." and the guys who flute barrels say "awe heck it's no problem at all, we do it all the time"...

    I have never gotten legitimate proof or information to support a negative effect. Only conjecture and speculation.

    The few decent Storys I read or people actually spoken about fluting after rifling caused no change in performance or derogatory effects.
    YMMV.
     
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  10. whiskeybill

    whiskeybill Battle Ground, WA Well-Known Member

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    If the barrel you have is an accurate one, why risk destroying it's accuracy? It would probably be less expensive all around to just replace it with a fluted barrel. You say it is awkward and too heavy. Most heavy barrel applications are for bench shooting targets and varmint type hunting, where you're not having to pack the gun all over the back country.

    As for those machinists that say they can successfully flute a barrel and not change or affect the accuracy, just remember, surgeons perform surgeries that may not be needed. They're paid to cut. You can do something as simple as put a threaded muzzle break on an accurate rifle and change it's characteristics. Just sayin'.

    I would be making some calls to folks at the premier barrel making outfits. Shilen, Krieger, Dan Lilja, or Douglas. Ask the experts their take on it. I bet they would be more than happy to talk to you.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2014