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Nearly Clueless

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by gunnails, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. gunnails

    gunnails Hillsboro Active Member

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    OK, as a newb to the forum I have spent about 4 hours browsing the site.

    I have learned a few cool things, the biggest thing I learned is that I know diddly about guns. In fact I don't even know what 1/2 my guns are.

    Where to start?

    Would anyone like to offer a good resource for gun verbiages, such as how do I figure out what a 22lrhp means (22 long rifle high power I assume)?

    What is a good way to find out what kinda gun is it that is sitting in front of me?

    Google isn't cutting it.

    I was thinking maybe starting a thread with pictures and the info from the barrels and then someone might respond and tell me what I have and an its approximate value. Is this common are does the forum frown on such threads?

    All responses appreciated.
     
  2. Cougfan2

    Cougfan2 Hillsboro, OR Well-Known Member

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    Pictures and any info stamped on the barrel would be a good start. Someone here is bound to be able to help you. BTW .22 lrhp = Long Rifle Hollow Point ASFAIK.
     
  3. johnboy

    johnboy Hillsboro Member

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    22LRHP= 22 long rifle hollow point

    Best way to determine what you have is a copy of the Blue Book of Gun Values (an old one will work for ID purposes if yours are a few years old)
     
  4. NK777

    NK777 West of Portland Member

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    WOW! Really!?!?

    Take a gun safety course yesterday. I'm serious if you don't know diddly about guns and you own some TAKE A COURSE, because that is just scary. Ask your local gun shop about a gun safety course.

    I was raised with guns but I even took a hunters safety course back when I was a wee lad. Good information in those courses. 4H used to offer classes, not sure if they still do or not though.

    Be safe and when your ready happy shooting.
     
  5. gunnails

    gunnails Hillsboro Active Member

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    =========================================================

    Maybe I over stated my ignorance.

    I bought my first gun, a shot gun, 25 years ago. I use to be big into upland bird hunting, but the dog died.

    I have shot one deer, and failed on about 8 hunting seasons, I the suck at deer hunting.

    I had hunter safety in 1976.

    I can disassemble all of my guns and properly clean them, handling and maintenance i am ok.

    7 of my 8 guns were given me, people die, wifes want the gun out of the house etc. I just never researched to find out what I had.

    For instance I have a Sturm Ruger 270win single shot lever action? My point is I don't know what model it is or what year it was produced, what it's value is. I know I have 3ct 22 caliber, a 30/06, a 270, a 20 gauge, and 2ct 12 gauge. I just don't know what model they all are or there value.

    And then when I read the classifieds I am overwhelmed with the terminology and the vast variety. I realize I have a lot to study on before I chose a hand gun. Although price as always tends to be the deciding factor.

    Thank you for your advice, I should look into a hand gun safety/training class.
     
  6. Grizzly_A

    Grizzly_A Portland Metro Area Member

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    To answer your questions.....

    If you look at the barrels of your guns (rifles) you'll find out the caliber and make. From there it's usually pretty easy to figure out the model.

    Handguns typically have the mfg/model stamped on the frame and depending on the handgun, some more info on the barrel.

    You can start a thread for the Rifles in the Rifles section, and handguns in the Handgun section.

    On prices you could expect to get for them if you were to sell them, purchasing a blue-book is a the most self-reliant way to go. You can get an idea of what they are going for (once you figure out what you own) by visiting the classifieds sections, or going to any number of online dealers/auctions.

    You can ask for values of people off the forum, it's a pretty nice group of people. I wouldn't go overboard with it.

    But do some research, learn your firearms, and there are enough people here to fill in the holes.

    As for verbiage...reading the gun forums and then searching them for the acronym can be helpful. Some people actually spell out the acroynm the first time and then continue to use it afterwards...like proper english writing. ;)

    Start small and work your way up.
     
  7. Grizzly_A

    Grizzly_A Portland Metro Area Member

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    I kinda had a gut feeling you were gifted/inherited some. I'll take them off your hands for free. :D

    If it's a Ruger Single Shot, then it's probably a Ruger #1. (1 shot) You can get the serial # off the gun, and then call Ruger to find out the year of mfg.

    Most of the info will be stamped on the barrel or on the receiver. That's where you need to start. Google some of the information that you find in those 2 spots and you'll start getting some better information from the Internet.
     
  8. MarkSBG

    MarkSBG Beaverton Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I'll double his offer...:laugh:
     
  9. NK777

    NK777 West of Portland Member

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    Yes you over stated your ignorance greatly. Glad to hear you aren't some ignorant kid that inherited a bunch of guns. I was only concerned about your safety and the safety of those around you. I didn't mean any insult.
     
  10. deadeye

    deadeye Albany,OR. Moderator Staff Member

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    PM me the info and I will tell you what they are and how much they are worth....................NO REALLY I will Iwill I will..........:paranoid::D
     
  11. motoman98

    motoman98 Gresham, OR Active Member

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    Get your Firearms Reference Library started.
    Don't rely on the internet only, there is as much crap out here as there is good info. Go to midwayusa, Brownells, and keep looking. There is wealth of info, and you can take it home.
    One suggestion is "Cartridges of the World".
    C'mon, lets start a suggestion list of good books on guns.
     
  12. Defiant1

    Defiant1 Auburn New Member

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    I was worried they were stolen and you wanted to know how well you scored, glad you updated your situation
     
  13. bikemaniac1

    bikemaniac1 Portland Oregon Member

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  14. MarkAd

    MarkAd Port Orchard Well-Known Member

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    the on-line gun dictionary is a great resource
     
  15. Grizzly_A

    Grizzly_A Portland Metro Area Member

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    Holy crap! Do people assume the best intentions anymore?
     
  16. ORBrit

    ORBrit Eugene Member

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    It may not be a bad idea to take them to a gunsmith.
    That would probably help identify them and the important thing is give them a once over for functionality and safety - especially if you think they've been neglected or abused.
     
  17. tionico

    tionico Thurston County Well-Known Member

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    Another good way to learn a lot is to figure out the basics of a given piece... read the info stamped into the barrel or breech area, usually will identify maker, often model, and caliber. THEN go onto a site like www.gunbroker.com and do a search with that info... you can search current offerings and/or closed auctions. Lots of pics there, you should be able to identify yours by comparison. Someone wanting to sell a gun will take a pile of pics, showing every angle and detail.. makes for a more informed buyer. SO-- learn from their work. Also, you can get a fair idea of pricing. If a gun is on there at a given price to start, and there are bids on it running it a few hundred dollars up, you can be sure those bidding are willing to actually PAY their bid amount. And, of course, once it closes, the reserve and selling price are revealed... so you can be sure SOMEONE thought it was worth that...... if there is a trail of twenty bids, getting hot and heavy toward close, you can be certain the final sell price is pretty close to its actual value. If you were to put it on there to sell, many of those who didn't bid high enough would find it and bid.....
    One other idea... and I've actually done this. The Cabelas store here in the Olympia area (I-5 north to exit 111, then north to second roundabout, west to the next, south into the store's HUGE lot) is a great resource. Head upstairs to the Guun Library, where any of the gents on staff there will be glad to identify and evaluate your guns. No charge.... now, what they will state as its price is what THEY would pay for it..... cause they want to turn a profit. (SOMEONE's got to pay the rent there....). Most in the GL are VERY knowledgeable on firearms, most can recognise normal things instantly, and tell you some stories on them. I brought in two pre-Second German War long guns, no clue what they were.... both were recognised immediately as to maker and country of origin, but it took them a little longer (with their reference books) to positively identify which exact model and production years..... one was Jap, the other a Swiss. Sold the Jap, I had NO interest in it, but kept the Swiss, and a sweet rifle that is.
    Sounds like you've launched into an adventure... it should be fun. DO post some pics and stories on here once you have some. mosst of us are rather keen on interesting old firearms. May not want to shoot them all the time preferring more modern ones.
     
  18. Throckmorton

    Throckmorton Florence,Ore ah gone Well-Known Member

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    I don't think anyone here would mind a 'what's it worth? ' thread with pics.Heck,we all like guns,right?
     
  19. nwg19

    nwg19 Auburn WA. Member

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    That ruger number 1 should be pretty easy to sell. Ditto on the 870.
    I'd crop those feet out of the pics if I were you:D.
    BTW welcome to the forum.
    .....tom
     
  20. fromotoc

    fromotoc Downtown Portland, OR Member

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    You could get $250 for the remington 870 easily, more if you want to wait on a buyer, and the marlin 30-06 should sell easily within your price range you quoted. The shotguns prices are good, most people can afford $100 shotgun. So are you really looking to sell all those guns? If I were you, I would do everything I can to keep them. Tell the wife it's like throwing away your relatives memory. Inheritance items have more than monitary value. If you want a handgun, offer the 870 up to trade for a handgun. I suggest a 1911 in .45acp, but you probably want a 9mm (cheaper ammo) semi. You will probably get an offer for a ruger 9mm or something of the sort. You really get more out of trading than you might if you sell it. Put it on here and outdoorstrader.com. And if you get an offer for something like a hipoint 9mm or something you aren't sure about, post it here, we'll all help you (a trade for the 870 for a hipoint is a horrible trade, on your end). Now is a good time to sell guns, and kind of a crappy time to buy them (due to obama's presidency and the fear that ensued), but it's getting alot better pricewise. Patience is really key when it comes to trading something for something specific.