Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

My Trip to WinCo

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by Riot, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. Riot

    Riot Benton County, Washington Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,047
    Likes Received:
    1,741
    Mkay, before I start I want to clarify that the reasoning for this thread being in the Prep forum is because I was buying bulk food from WinCo and thus these are the results for all to share.


    Alrighty...so my mylar bags came in, and I wanted to run to WinCo and buy a 5gal bucket and fill it with flour. However, I didn't want to pay for the weight of the bucket with the GAMMA lid along with the flour.

    First thing I did was locate a manager and get the "okay" to proceed...

    So, I grabbed two buckets and two GAMMA lids...lined one of them with my mylar bag and filled it with flour. After taking all of WinCo's whole wheat flour (which almost filled up my bucket) I threw on the GAMMA lid and ran to the checkout.

    Here is where it gets interesting...

    I estimate that the bucket contained about 45-50lbs of flour; however, I found an important fact about WinCo, their scales only go up to 30lbs. So, I'm a paratrooper- I figure "adapt and overcome, hooah!" An idea emerges...aren't there other scales in a grocery store? So, off to the deli we go!

    Those scales only go to 30lbs as well...I estimate that there are probably meat scales in the back that go above 30lbs; nevertheless, the manager wasn't game past this point.

    No worries, I figure I'll just put half and half in my buckets and just make both buckets flour (off to my truck to get another mylar bag).

    Well here is where it gets interesting...after being charged with the flour, the teller had no idea how to subtract the weight of the buckets. So I took the loss (it was only a couple bucks anyways) and checked out.


    Conclusion: If I want any more of bulk food, I will have to pack it in the supplied bags and buy it in small increments. So basically I'm going to have to pull out those small clear bags, put a twisty tie on it and buy it by a couple pounds at a time.

    Lessons Learned:
    1. The bulk food containers inside WinCo are not as full as they seem. Although they are about three feet tall, they are only about a foot deep (basically enough to fill a 5gal bucket). If there was a food scare, this would not last long.
    2. GAMMA lids are worth their weight in gold. Being able to go back into a bucket and seal it back up again is invaluable.
    3. This method is still less expensive than buying a bucket of food online and paying for the shipping (since the weight is going to be about 45lbs per bucket).
    4. An empty 5gal food bucket from WinCo w/ a Gamma lid weighs 3.12lbs.

    I posted this so you guys could learn from my experience...happy hunting.
     
  2. Decker

    Decker My house Active Member

    Messages:
    833
    Likes Received:
    110
    Nicely done, thanks for the heads up.
     
  3. +1. Appreciate the tips on the little things as they tend to be the things that cause the most trouble. :thumbup:
     
  4. The Cheese

    The Cheese somewhere special Member

    Messages:
    737
    Likes Received:
    13
    at winco if you want to buy bulk, ask someone to get the person incharge of the bulk section. Then go to the item that you want. On the price and SKU sheet thing, there is a line that says Case Price. This is the price for that item in a big bag or what ever container it comes in. Ask to get X amount of cases. Then take those to the front. They just scan the bar code and away you go. Only down side is that you might have more or less than you need. I always get more. Also, sometimes they may not have what you need in but they can always special order it for you. Usually only takes a week or so I am told. Every time I go they have what i have needed. Also, alot of there stuff is bobs red mill which is kind of nice.

    On a side note, I hope you aren't planning on saving the whole wheat flour for too long. It tends to go bad a lot quicker than white wheat, and once its ground the nutrients start to degrade rather rapidly. After awhile it will probably be just about on par with white flour, only it will have a bit more fiber.
     
  5. bugeye

    bugeye Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,098
    Likes Received:
    12
    WinCo tip, We avoid shopping at Winco suring the first 9 days of the month, or the last day of the month. These dates are when the Oregon equivalent of food stamps come out (based on the last digit of your birth year) and it nearly impossible to get through the store. Other than that I love the low prices!
     
  6. e28rusty

    e28rusty Newberg Member

    Messages:
    152
    Likes Received:
    9
    Wow I had no idea, thanks for the tip.
     
  7. cyclesurvival

    cyclesurvival Vancouver Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,090
    Likes Received:
    52
    My wife buys food staples by the case and there is a discount, you have to oreder it and they call you when it arrives. you can also order bulk the same way just talk to a manager and provide the number and quantity. Avoid shopping on the 1-15 of the durring the day. early morning or evenings after 6pm are better. we call it combat shopping after comming home you fell like you should of taken you scattergun.
     
  8. Trlsmn

    Trlsmn In Utero (Portland) Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,838
    Likes Received:
    1,186
    Good tip, thanks!
     
  9. SheepDog223

    SheepDog223 Salem Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,120
    Likes Received:
    193
    All you have to do is ask the bulk foods manager to order you a 50 pound bad of whatever. My wife and I buy at a winco in the salem area and we're getting calls once or twice a week saying our this or that is in.

    The bulk food bins are only 1/3 full at any store. Can you imagine anybody reaching all the way down to the bottom for a scoop of this or that? It's not only a freshness thing it's a liability issue.

    Ask the bulk foods manager to order you a bag of whatever you like and I'm sure they'll do it for you too.
     
  10. chemist

    chemist Beaverton OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,620
    Likes Received:
    644
    Yeah, I always have the bulk-filler person order full bags for me, and then I take 'em home to fill the bags & buckets.

    White flour and white rice will last about forever, but even whole wheat and brown rice can be kept for years if there are oxygen absorbers inside the bags - those silver-colored, multilayered Mylar bags, that is.
     
  11. The Cheese

    The Cheese somewhere special Member

    Messages:
    737
    Likes Received:
    13
    Hmm. with brown rice I was always told that it will go rancid in less than a year in most cases. I imagine if the temp was kept cold enough it might be ok, but I am not a huge fan of brown rice so we don't have a ton laying around.
     
  12. Riot

    Riot Benton County, Washington Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,047
    Likes Received:
    1,741
    Thanks for the heads up about the bulk food manager guys! I had no idea you could order this stuff this way (I kinda figured once I got a hold of a manager, they would simply direct me to the proper process of buying in bulk if what I was doing wasn't doable).
     
  13. Wenis

    Wenis Tri-Cities, WA Member

    Messages:
    626
    Likes Received:
    23
    I found this on a survival-type website. Take it for what it's worth, but I saved it.



    Valuable Shelf Life Storage Info MAKE A COPY FOR REFERENCE!!!
    ________________________________________
    Storage Life Notes About Specific Foods:

    The Soft Grains

    Barley
    Hulled or
    Pearled Oat
    Groats
    Rolled Oats
    Quinoa
    Rye

    Soft Grains have softer outer shells which don't
    protect the seed interior as well as hard shelled seeds
    and therefore won't store as long. Hermetically sealed
    in the absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life of
    8 years at a stable temperature of 70 degrees F. They
    should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler
    temperatures.


    The Hard Grains

    Buckwheat
    Corn, Dry
    Flax
    Kamut
    Millet
    Durum wheat
    Hard red wheat
    Hard white wheat
    Soft wheat
    Special bake wheat
    Spelt
    Triticale

    The Hard Grains all store well because of their hard
    outer shell which is nature's near perfect container.
    Remove that container and the contents rapidly
    deteriorate. Wheat, probably nature's longest storing
    seed, has been known to be edible after scores of years
    when stored in a cool dry place. As a general rule for
    hard grains, hermetically sealed in the absence of
    oxygen, plan on a storage life of 15-20 years at a
    stable temperature of 70 degrees F. They should keep
    proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures.


    Beans

    Adzuki Beans
    Blackeye Beans
    Black Turtle Beans
    Garbanzo Beans
    Great Northern
    Kidney Beans
    Lentils
    Lima Beans
    Mung Beans
    Pink Beans
    Pinto Beans
    Small Red Beans
    Soy Beans

    As beans age they lose their oils, resist water
    absorbtion and won't swell. Worst case, they must
    be ground to be used. Storing beans in nitrogen
    helps prolong the loss of these oils as does cool
    temperatures. Hermetically sealed in the absence
    of oxygen, plan on a storage life of 8-10 years at
    a stable temperature of 70 degrees F. They should keep
    proportionately longer if stored 10-20 degree F cooler
    temperatures.

    Dehydrated Vegetables

    Broccoli
    Cabbage
    Carrots
    Celery
    Onions
    Peppers
    Potatoes

    Dehydrated vegetables store well if hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen. Plan on a storage life of 8-10 years at a stable temperature of 70 degrees F. They should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures.


    Dehydrated Dairy Products

    Cheese Powder
    Cocoa Powder
    Powder Eggs
    Butter/margarine pdr
    Powder Milk
    Morning Moo
    Whey Powder

    Dehydrated Dairy Products generally store very well if stored dry in hermetically sealed containers with the oxygen removed. Plan on a storage life of 5 to 10 years if stored at a stable temperature of 70 degrees F. They should keep, probably 5 years longer, if stored at cooler temperatures.
    One exception is Morning Moo. As a new whey based product, it hasn't been tested for long term storage. Plan on rotating this product after 5 years.




    Flours and Other Products
    Made From Cracked/ground Seed


    All Purpose Flour
    Bakers Flour
    Unbleached Flour
    White Flour
    Whole Wheat Flour
    Cornmeal
    Mixes
    Refried Beans
    Cracked wheat
    Germade
    Gluten
    Wheat flakes

    After seeds are broken open their outer shells can no
    longer protect the seed contents and seed nutrients
    start to degrade. Don't try to store unprotected
    flours longer than a year. Hermetically sealed in the
    absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life of 5 years at
    a stable temperature of 70 degrees F. They should keep
    proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures.
    Note: Granola is not a long storing food because of the nuts. They contain high concentrations of oil which go rancid over the short term. Expect granola to last about 6-9 months.

    Pasta

    Macaroni
    Noodles
    Ribbons
    Spaghetti

    Pasta will store longer than flour if kept dry. Hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life of 10 - 15 years at a stable temperature of 70 degrees F. Pasta should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures.


    Dehydrated Fruit


    Fruit doesn't keep as well as many dehydrated items. Hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life of 10-15 years at a stable temperature of 70 degrees F. They should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures.


    Honey, Salt and Sugar

    Honey, Salt and Sugar should keep indefinitely if stored free of moisture. Watch out for additives in the honey. It is possible to buy honey with water and sugar added. This honey generally doesn't crystallize like pure 100% honey does when stored for a long time. If there are additives, there is no saying how long it will last.


    Peanut Butter Powder

    Peanut Butter Powder will not store as long as wheat flour. Hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life of 4-5 years at a stable temperature of 70 degrees F. It should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures.


    Brown and White Rices

    Brown and white rices store very differently. Brown rice is only expected to store for 6 months under average conditions. This is because of the essential fatty acids in brown rice. These oils quickly go rancid as they oxidize. It will store much longer if refrigerated. White rice has the outer shell removed along with those fats. Because of this, white rice isn't nearly as good for you, but will store longer. Hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life for white rice of 8-10 years at a stable temperature of 70 degrees F. It should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures. Stored in the absence of oxygen, brown rice will last longer than if it was stored in air. Plan on 1 to 2 years. It is very important to store brown rice as cool as possible, for if you can get the temperature down another ten degrees, it will double the storage life again.


    Garden Seed or Sprouting Seed

    All viable seeds are hibernating tiny living plants that only need moisture and warmth to sprout. And much like a chick in an egg, all the nutrients this little life needs to spring into existence is contained within it's shell. Like boiling an egg, heating a seed will kill that little life within it. However, unlike an egg, a seed can withstand cold temperatures. As seeds usually remain edible after the life within it dies, we must use different criteria when determining sproutable seed storage life. And again the big deciding factor is temperature. Plan on a storage life of 2 to 3 years at a stable temperature of 70 degrees F. They should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures. And remember, you want to store all of these seeds in air. Packed in nitrogen, the viability of some seeds will last longer than others. This is still to a large degree an unexplored science, and therefore we recommend you store all the seeds you plan on sprouting in air.
    Alfalfa is a unique seed as it actually germinates better if the seed is 2 or 3 years old. Most any sample of alfalfa contains 'hard' seed and 'soft' seed. Soft seed germinates within two days while hard seed germinates in about a week. The problem is, by the time the soft seed sprouts are ready to harvest, the hard seed may not have germinated yet. As storage time draws on, the hard seed turns into soft seed. Older seed germinates closer together. Stored in cool conditions, alfalfa seed should have a good percentage of germination up until it is 8 years old.



    Total Vegetable Protein (TVP)

    Total Vegetable Protein, made from soy beans, has an unusually long storage life. Hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life of 15-20 years at a stable temperature of 70 degrees F. meat substitute should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures.


    Yeast

    Yeast, a living organism, has a relatively short storage life. Keep yeast in the original metal foil storage containers. If the seal remains intact, yeast should last 2 years at 70 degrees F. However it is strongly recommended that you refrigerate it, which should give you a storage life of 5 years. Frozen yeast should store for a long time.
     
  14. coctailer

    coctailer Portland, OR/Hastings, MI/Vancouver,WA I run with scissors.

    Messages:
    5,074
    Likes Received:
    588
    You buy the bucket and Gamma lid at WinCo also?
     
  15. Riot

    Riot Benton County, Washington Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,047
    Likes Received:
    1,741
    HECK YEAH! After shipping costs, WinCo has the cheapest around!
     
  16. sailorman2010

    sailorman2010 Tri-Cities, WA Member

    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    21
    Does anyone know if they carry Hard Red Winter Wheat at WinCo? I guess Walmart does, I'll have to check both out in the Tri-Cities area. Hey, thanks for the great info all.
     
  17. The Cheese

    The Cheese somewhere special Member

    Messages:
    737
    Likes Received:
    13
    I am pretty sure they do. Its usually listed as wheat berries on the tag. But if you want to get Hard Red Wheat, find a mormon and head to one of the LDS canneries. Its about half the cost of everywhere else. About $0.25/lb where as most everywhere else is $0.50-$1.00/lb. Not trying to push the religion thing at all (I am not a member), just trying to save y'all some $$$$. Although I think winco is probably one of the next cheapest places to get it.
     
  18. Riot

    Riot Benton County, Washington Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,047
    Likes Received:
    1,741
    This is the bulk food list for WinCo (minus the candy)

    The Winco Bulk list | The Krazy Coupon Lady
     
  19. Contract_Pilot

    Contract_Pilot Vancouver, Washington Active Member

    Messages:
    833
    Likes Received:
    103
    I do stocking from cash and carry can get some good prices on bulk when there is a sale. I got 200lbs of flour was $6.90 a 50lb bag over the summer. Looked last week was on sale for $12.49...

    http://www.smartfoodservice.com/specials.aspx?Ad=UGA

    My problem is trying to figure out where to place it all.

    But when the zombies come I will be ready.