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My Survival/GHB Pack

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by RedneckRampage, Jan 7, 2015.

  1. RedneckRampage

    RedneckRampage Newberg Well-Known Member

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    For a long time, I've wanted to put together a get home bag or survival pack. The plan is to keep it in my truck. Tonight I started making a list to pack into the pack. I'm sure I'm missing some things. The pack its self is a military issue MOLLE II pack in woodland camo. I know the camo is not the best idea, but nowadays, it fits in, even in urban environments. Now, on top of this, my truck is pretty packed anyway. I can grab what else I think I'll need and stuff it in, like heavier coat, sunglasses, different shoes...The 10/22 mags are for the 10/22 Takedown that is LOCKED in my truck, all the time, Glock mags are for my carry gun.

    Here is my list -

    Food/cooking -
    3 - MREs
    2 - instant potatoes
    3 - tuna packs
    3 - Clif bars
    1 - pack jerky
    1 - bottle water
    2 - canteens
    1 - stainless camp cup
    1 - MSR stove w/fuel
    1 - water purifier/filter

    Clothes -
    2 - BDU pants
    2 - T-shirts
    2 - heavy socks
    2 - regular socks
    1 - hoodie
    2 - underwear
    1 - thermal top
    1 - thermal bottom

    Protection -
    2 - Glock 23 magazines
    4 - 10/22 magazines
    1 - CRK Pacific knife

    Survival -
    1 - pack storm matches
    1 - fire steel
    2 - BIC lighters
    1 - small fishing kit (hooks, line...)
    1 - small fire kit (tinder, steel wool...)
    1 - first aid kit
    1 - Pirantah knife
    2 - Storm candles

    Shelter -
    1 - 8'x10' light tarp
    1 - wool blanket
    1 - 100' 550 cord
    6 - tent stakes

    Misc. -
    1 - Surefire head lamp w/spare batts.
    1 - Surefire E1B light
    1 - Cammenga compass
    1 - OR/WA maps
    1 - pen/paper
    1 - Mechanix gloves

    What should I add?

    What should I take out?

    The idea is to be able to survive for a couple days, out of this pack, for whatever reason.
     
  2. TapRackNGo

    TapRackNGo PNW Well-Known Member

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    Don't forget to strip down the MRE's.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2016
    Sgt Nambu likes this.
  3. Just Jim

    Just Jim Well-Known Member

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    :D Them little baby wipes ain't going to take care of the really big jobs and neither will those little tp packets with the mre. Half a roll should get me home:D
     
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  4. RedneckRampage

    RedneckRampage Newberg Well-Known Member

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    I do not know what it all weighs. I have had quite a bit of training, when I was in Search and Rescue, we'd go on weekend trips and pretty much live you of our pack. I've also spent lots of time camping and exploring the woods, building fires different ways just for fun, etc. I'm not a fan of normal hiking packs, I tried Kelty and REI ones, never was happy.

    I will look at the things you suggested. My headlamp does have a red cover, as well as being adjustable in brightness with a rotary dial.
     
  5. Riot

    Riot Benton County, Washington Well-Known Member

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    In my opinion, GHBs should be light and allow a lot of mobility...I only carry water purifiers, beef jerky, paracord, a leatherman, lighters and an emergency blanket, extra ammo and a couple knives in mine...my thought process is that I need to get home ASAP where my family is, where my armor is and where all my good stuff is...but then again, I've got like 45miles to travel if I'm at work and need to get home.

    As a caveat it should be noted that I take a lot of gear with me to work already (coats, gloves, thermals, knit hats) and would be stripping that bag out, adding my GHB and heading home- one step at a time.

    Don't overthink your GHB...it's not a 72hr kit unless you think it will take you 72hrs to get home...
     
  6. TapRackNGo

    TapRackNGo PNW Well-Known Member

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    Always a work in progress. In my experience, I found that I put everything in my bag in the beginning. After taking a 3 day trip I took out most of it (backpacking). For the record, I don't carry a GHB in my vehicle. It's more of a bag if family were to get stranded for a few hrs or overnight (water, bars, med kit, lighter, small bills) 99.9% of the time a cell phone and CC is probably all you would need.
     
  7. frauhunter

    frauhunter Central Oregon Member

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    Good basic load out. TapRackNGo and Riot had good thoughts as well. I would just add a word about weather and camouflage.

    Thus far this winter low temps have hit -14 and held around the zero mark for days at a time. Highs in the single digits and teens. I check my gear quarterly for seasonal appropriateness. Bermuda shorts in a Central Oregon winter make as much sense as wool socks in a Central Oregon summer.

    Camouflage is the art of blending in with your environment, and military gear in a civilian environment does not blend well - especially camo patterns. It gets noticed and telegraphs to others that you are trained, supplied, and may be armed - i.e.; the guy who has stuff others may want. If you need to travel with this bag, there is a fair chance that it will be under circumstances where standing out from the crowd makes you a target. You're not just trying to avoid thugs and the merely panicked, but police and government mercenaries as well. Remember the gun confiscation during Katrina? Warrantless home invasions by police in Boston? Sadly, you cannot count on them to be your friend, especially in a crises. When you think camouflage in this context, think Grey Man.

    And yes, as TapRackNGo noted, it does always seem to be a work in progress.

    Ex Gladio Libertas
     
  8. trainsktg

    trainsktg Portland OR Well-Known Member

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  9. Just Jim

    Just Jim Well-Known Member

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    I think a monocular would be helpful, nice to be able to look an area over before you go into it. Vortex makes a couple of good ones.
     
    mjbskwim likes this.
  10. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Something to cover your eyes, preferably vented goggles.

    If it is snowing, or raining really hard, or hailing, or there is a dust storm, or there is a lot of smoke or just about anything else, including just plain really cold temps, goggles will help protect your eyes.

    At the very least, inexpensive safety glasses with side shields - but goggles are better.

    If your eyes are compromised you won't get far or be able to see threats.

    -----

    Dust mask at least, preferably a filter - P95

    Again, you can't get far if you can't breathe. Filters/masks often help pre-heat the air you breathe when it is very cold, helping to keep you warm.
     
  11. Medic!

    Medic! What just happened? Has eagle eyes. But cant remember what he saw. Bronze Supporter

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    Emergency crank style radio. You may be the only guy in a crowd that knows what is going on! It's always good to know where not to go.

    And don't forget some salt. And safety pins. Very handy. You can fix a strap. Or a torn jacket quickly. Then sew it later. If time allows.
     
  12. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    I'm a slow reader,so it may be mentioned already.
    I don't care how good your hair looks or how long you have gone without a hat,carry a appropriate hat for the season.Too much sun will ruin your day as will some freezing rain.
    1 of those folding rain hats is small enough to leave in their year round
    http://www.rei.com/product/238313/outdoor-research-seattle-sombrero
     
    CoastRange57 likes this.
  13. LMT10mm

    LMT10mm Hillsboro Member

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    Floss
    Toilet paper
    Tooth brush
    Chapstick or Vaseline(dry lips and face sucks in cold)
    Bandana ( lots of uses ie tourniquet)
    Small mirror
    Knife sharpener
    Leather man
    Flare

    Even though it's tough remember the k.i.s.s. Rule......good luck! Fun stuff
     
  14. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    My philosophy on a GHB is that it should have the minimum to get me home (currently serves as my BOL - a small house on 20 forested acres on a mountain):

    2u79biw.jpg

    Ninety nine plus percent of the time I will within 50 miles of my home.

    So I try to keep it simple. I assume that if I need my GHB I will be walking.

    My GHB is a very small (200 CI) Camelbak Lobo Hydration pack.

    f_1691a_1.1.jpg

    What I would carry in it would depend on the situation. I carry some supplies in my trunk, including water and FD food and an Ecotat shelter, so I would choose from those depending on the situation.

    I carry some spare clothes and hiking boots in my trunk too.

    So the very basics:

    Shelter (Ecotat) that doubles as raingear and camo

    Food (Mountain House pouch meals)

    Water (the hydration pack itself and some water bottles) with a small Sawyer inline water filter that works either with a water bottle or the hydration bladder in the pack.

    First aid kit

    Fire starting kit and small Trangia type alcohol stove

    Two survival knives (besides my EDC pocket knife which includes a small flashlight and whistle and firesteel); Gerber Prodigy and Cold Steel Survival Edge

    Security - at the least, a personal defense handgun with ammo. If current events mandate, I might have a personal defense rifle in the trunk (a bullpup) with mags and ammo - which would be on a sling and carried hidden under the Ecotat poncho.

    I might also have rimfire rifle or handgun and ammo, suitable for small game if I am out in the boonies or traveling over to the coast in case I get stuck off the beaten path. I have several to choose from, including this which weighs less than one pound:

    pak-rifle-3.jpg

    Communication - I almost always have my little Baofeng 2 meter/70 cm handheld either in my car or my work bag.

    The assumption is that I will be within less than 5 days from some place I can find either permanent shelter and more food/water supplies, or help and transportation to home, or I will be home.

    The most likely situation, given that I work in downtown Portland (30 miles from home) is that I would find myself on foot somewhere between work and home, and have to walk home.

    My kids live halfway between my work and home, so I could stop there and re-supply and rest, maybe getting transportation to home if they haven't left to go to my home. Their home is near the edge of suburbia and rural land, and not particularly vulnerable to any natural disaster, so their home would probably be intact.

    If I have to walk from work to home, I could probably make it to my kids place in less than two days, maybe at best one day. If I could get transport part of the way there, then even better.

    But the point I getting to, is that my GHB is minimal and lightweight. No knife sharpener (I can sharpen a knife on a rock or concrete), no toothbrush (I can do without) or other stuff that isn't absolutely necessary to survive for a short period of time. I am not going camping or backpacking, I am trying to survive and get home.
     
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  15. Legs

    Legs NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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  16. CoastRange57

    CoastRange57 Western Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Blending in is important, this brings the question, if you are trained in good survival and tactical skills, the way you move around is probably going to attract attention as well. Your situational awareness, how you move, how you observe others and terrain is going to convey that you know what you are doing.

    It is going to be very hard for me to deviate from my training and dumb down what I do. Maybe the same movements that attract this attention will also send the message " Do not f with me!" Just have to be ready to back it up.

    I also will have my ham radio, and hopefully would be able to hook up with others I know, just for that reason.
     
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  17. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    I was thinking about this ,this morning when I saw a kid at the local BK come to work with a coyote brown back pack.
    The military surplus ones may be the best.They are cheap and may make you look cheap and probably ain't got much.The Maxpedition packs may say you are tactical,but if you walk around without any situational awareness then you look like you are just trying to be tactiCOOL.
    I think CoastRange has hit it on the nose.These military and 5.11/maxpedition packs are hip now.Not really saying you know anything.
    Your body language and how you carry yourself will be the factor of you being recognized as being a threat or not. And bad guys do study body language. Heck back in the 70s they had a study out where they asked a bunch of violent prisoners to watch a film and tell who were the Yes,Maybes,and Nopes. Almost all of them put the exact same people in the same categories from how they carried themselves.If they had any situational awareness or not.
    A lot of bad guys seem stupid,but they sometimes have skills to pick the weak out
     
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  18. CoastRange57

    CoastRange57 Western Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    They are stupid in the things you and I consider normal. They are also very skilled at their criminal craft. This is how they make their living. This is what they do. They work on perfecting their skills daily. Most of the time when confronted with individuals skilled in self defense, offensive operations, and reactions to criminal behaviors, they run like the little bit*hes they are.

    Picking out their mark based upon behavior patterns is the first step in their interview process. Once they mark someone, they will then come with another inquiry to determine if they can do the crime. If you look difficult, they move on. If not you have one more chance to stop the crime before they commit to doing it.

    I see people every day that should just wear a sign that says, "I am a mark, I will offer no resistance, I am clueless".
     
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