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muzzle breaks?

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I have a kimber pro varmint in .223. The barrel is a midweight stainless fluted barrel with black fluting and I would like to put a muzzle break on it and was hoping you all could help me find something that would look good on the rifle.

I'm aware that the .223 doesn't have a lot of recoil but I love that with my 17 hmr I can see my targets being hit! I am trying to duplicate this performance with my .223 now.

Should I start with getting the barrel threaded and then pick out a break?


Thanks!
 
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Wait to thread the barrel untill you have a break and have the smith install it. Some breaks need to be "clocked". I put break on my 22x47 for the same reason. Be carefull choosing a break that directs gas backwards. You'll end up with a nasty muzzle blast effect. Look for a quiet style.
 

Spitpatch

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"Quiet" muzzle brakes (not "breaks") are only ever so slightly more "quiet" than the others. All will produce a significant more decibel level delivered to the shooter (and more importantly others in the vicinity). This is why they are outlawed at many shooting ranges, and why nearly all guides will either discourage their use in the field, or prohibit them for their clients (your "quiet" brake is not quiet for the guide beside you spotting). Another detriment is the blast that will stir up ground dust/debris at the shot, especially from the prone position, obscuring your (and the guide's) view of the delivery of the shot.

Having said that, they do have advantages, and I installed one on my .270 in preparation for a self-guided Dall Sheep hunt. I knew I'd be shooting it off the bench, and practicing from hunting positions extensively, and even the .270 produces enough recoil to adversely affect shooting ability. I credit the presence of that brake for allowing me to see the delivery of my first shot (no debris, since I shot from a boulder pile), and know that my sheep had been hit well, and kept the same hold for the second shot to anchor him.

I would recommend you purchase your brake from the same smith that will thread your barrel and install it. He will have the experience and knowledge to contour the brake perfectly to your gun. Most normally, he will also supply you with an end-cap to put on the gun for when you choose not to have your brake on the gun: likewise seamlessly contoured to your barrel. Usually, he will re-crown your barrel as well, greatly improving what the factory does. (Although with a Kimber, the crown may be hard to improve upon.)
 
OP
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Thank you for your detailed replies! anyone recommend a good smith to do this work? I would like this as you stated:

"Most normally, he will also supply you with an end-cap to put on the gun for when you choose not to have your brake on the gun: likewise seamlessly contoured to your barrel." I want something removable and not make the gun look ridiculous with a different contour to the break or cap
 

DirectDrive

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There are a bunch of muzzle devices to choose from.
The one that the AR competition shooters are gaga over is the Battle Comp but it's spendy.

Here's a chart that rates a few different devices.....I say "devices" because some are merely flash hiders and others are true "brakes". Some brakes are not good with flash or sound.
Muzzle Devices
 
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Ever think of a silencer? They are legal in your state. They cut recoil and noise. There are arguments about if they make the gun more accurate or not but no one claims they make them less accurate.

I own several and couldn't be happier.
 
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Tornado Technologies in Hillsboro for threading.
It is their specialty.

They also will index your brake if you drop it with them.
We have Yankee and Troy brakes on hand.
But ther is A LOT to choose from out there.

I like your thinking on this BTW!
 
OP
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I don't want to invest that much money into a suppressor at the moment. Plus, I believe they are illegal to hunt with so taking it after coyotes would be illegal?

so taking my rifle over to tornado technologies and having it threaded with a custom thread protector would work? do gunsmiths normally contour the break specifically for the rifle?
 
OP
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haha looks like we had the same thought with using tornado...hadn't refreshed the page before I replied...you beat me to it :)

what does "indexing the break" mean?
 
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Another post referred to "clocking" but indexing is the more common term.
It refers to installing the brake so the ports are positioned properly.
If you twist it on and the ports point down or sideways it won't work right.
Also Tornado doesn't need the barrel off the action, many lathes do.
Just take your stock off and you should be good to go.
They also guarantee the threads concentric to the bore.
If you do get a suppressor later, that is kind of important!
 
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There is a big difference in brake (so sorry for my miss spelling ) styles. Not all direct sound or gas anywhere Near shooter or spotter. I have considerable experience in this having tried five or six different brakes before finding one that worked for me.
 

DirectDrive

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There is a big difference in brake (so sorry for my miss spelling ) styles. Not all direct sound or gas anywhere Near shooter or spotter. I have considerable experience in this having tried five or six different brakes before finding one that worked for me.
So are you going to keep it a secret ?

:)
 
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If you have a rifle that already has a threaded barrel, do I still need a smith to install a new brake on it? Or can I just unscrew the current one and screw on another?
 
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As long as the brake isn't pinned on, you can change it. As has been noted, you may have to index it. The easy way is with a crush washer, but the right way is to machine the shoulder. You might get lucky, though.
 
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As long as the brake isn't pinned on, you can change it. As has been noted, you may have to index it. The easy way is with a crush washer, but the right way is to machine the shoulder. You might get lucky, though.
Actually, a using a crush washer is also a "right way". Ditto for using a "peel washer". A "pinned on" muzzle brake or flash suppressor is usually only installed on a short barrel in order to make it a legal length such as the CAR-15 with an 11.5" bbl and a 4.5" flash suppressor or brake.
 

Spitpatch

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While much of this information is valuable (especially to me, since I've been exploring a brake for my AR), I believe the OP was looking for guidelines toward doing so on a sporting bolt action gun. (Thus, "indexing" etc., is not of value to him). With respect to the OP's original inquiry, I will say that my brake for my Rem700 Stainless BDL was built by Vic Talmo. (This was way back in '94, so don't know if he is still in business). Another (and more current) source for a quality brake (befitting a Kimber), is Ron Bartlett (Vais Arms Inc.). He claims his "Vais brake" is the quietest of all. He supplies his brake to top-drawer outfits like Dakota Arms, McMillan, Hart, and Krieger. Finally, the best riflesmith in the Northwest, in my opinion, is Dennis Olson, in Plains, Montana. He does it all, and does it right. Can supply any number of brake styles (including the Vais).
 

DirectDrive

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I believe the OP was looking for guidelines toward doing so on a sporting bolt action gun. (Thus, "indexing" etc., is not of value to him).
Actually indexing or clocking is universal since most muzzle devices have a top and a bottom.

The top of a brake will often be vented to offset muzzle rise.
The bottom will often be closed to stop "dust signature" to use a military phrase.
 

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