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Mount scope myself or pay a professional?

  • Do it yourself

    Votes: 24 100.0%
  • Pay a professional

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    24
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if you only have one firearm, then pay someone to torque your scope down
I use my FAT tool at least once a month, on firearms, small motors and even appliance repair
I don't' install a carburetor or chain saw bar bolts without proper torque specs
 
It's not only about torque settings. It's about the proper sequence. A carb ear can be broken off if torqueing one nut down while the rest are loose.
So, lets assume 4 screws per ring. Work in an X pattern and bring them down in steps, whether your using something like a FAT wrench or not.
Not saying I thing the FAT wrench is a bad thing to have (actually, one's been on my wish list for a while), but proper usage is imperative. Guess it's easy for me to overlook the basics when explaining things. To me this is old hat. To others its uncharted waters.
 
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It's not only about torque settings. It's about the proper sequence. A carb ear can be broken off if torqueing one nut down while the rest are loose.
So, lets assume 4 screws per ring. Work in an X pattern and bring them down in steps, whether your using something like a FAT wrench or not.
Not saying I thing the FAT wrench is a bad thing to have (actually, one's been on my wish list for a while), but proper usage is imperative. Guess it's easy for me to overlook the basics when explaining things. To me this is old hat. To others its uncharted waters.
you are correct about the x pattern, be it a carb, scope or manifold on a Dodge 318
most scope manufactures have a video or instruction on how to torque THEIR specific scope, they are not all the same
I prefer 2 piece rings with 4 top mount screws
I think I have 20 rifles with scopes, all are tightened to OEM torque specs, not heavy handed
 
I think I have 20 rifles with scopes, all are tightened to OEM torque specs, not heavy handed

You mean like the guy that damn near twisted off the Leupold L-shaped Torx wrench included with the bases and rings? I still have that twisted tool as an example.
 

GWS

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Hey Folks,

I've had my Savage 110 for about 22 years. It was my first hunting rifle and currently has a Simmons 3x9 scope attached. The scope holds a good zero at 100 yrds but my shooting skills have surpassed what the scope can offer. I've purchased a Vortex and look forward to getting it mounted and zeroed.

Here is the question:

Should I mount the scope myself (I don't have a rifle bench) or pay to have it mounted? If paying what is a good spot around Salem?
Try mounting it yourself. Get some experience and if you screw up then take it to a gunsmith.
Getting the scope level has been the tricky part for me till I bought this tool from Arisaka:

https://arisakadefense.com/optic-leveler-combo/

It really is a timesaver
 

thorborg

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If yo decide to give it a go:
You don't need an adjustable or level bench to level your scope as long as you can secure your gun fairly Ridgely, (upright helpful but not a prerequisite) by any means, (clamps, duct tape, Velcro fasteners, padded vice grips, porch rail, tailgate, chair back) if you get yourself a digital inclinometer. they can be had for as little as 20 bucks. Haven't looked but maybe even harbor freight. all you need to do is set it on any top rifle flat you can find and zero it. Then just before you tighten the scope bolts set the inclinometer on the top scope adjustment cover and tweak rotate it until it comes to zero again and you will be aligned up with whatever reference you used on the gun when you zeroed it.. other referenced points can be used as long as both the scope and rifle has the same, or 90 degree points in common (unless you want to do the math)
Mine has magnets (though you will have to hold or balance it on aluminum scopes) on all sides and I use it constantly for other things like aligning my table saw blade to the table and drill press table to drill. much faster than square or protractor especially when working angles. I zero it to my table saw surface then stick it to the saw blade and crank it to what ever angle I need, it has (so far) never been been wrong and better than my own eyes.
001a.jpg
 
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I appreciate everyone's feedback. I have plenty of tools...except the bubble level and rifle bench. I don't plan on buying a bunch of stuff to mount the scope since this is my only hunting rifle and I have no plans of adding scoped rifles to my inventory in the future.

I probably should have phrased it as more of a "cost/benefit" question. Without a rifle bench would it be worth fiddling for two hours or pay someone $50?

@dangerranger60 the new scope has a shallower bevel so the current mount and ring location aren't going to work. I'll need to buy a longer mount so the rings can be in the proper position.

I'll most likely start and see if I can mount it myself. If I get flummoxed I'll take it to a smith.

Thanks everyone.
If you need to change the mount and rings, and are not used to this a pro might be the way to go. Choosing the right mount, and rings can be an issue. The wrong parts are why a level is important. it tips you off that something is not aligned before sending a lot of ammo down range. Good Luck, DR
 

ilikegunspdx

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I would watch some respected scope manufacturers videos. There's a couple really good ones out there but can't remember what brands. Then u can pick and choose what techniques u want to use or not. Avoid the internet hack expert videos, unless u find someone who really knows their stuff (they r out there for most any subject but u have to weed through a gazillion idiots who think they r experts to find them!). Cheers!
 

eldbillbo

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What is considered professionally? Any sporting goods store can mount one up and bore sight it and some so-called smiths do it just like the guys at a sporting good counter so make sure if you are paying to have it done that it's done right. Not that it takes a lot of tools or knowledge how but it should be done right for you. There is no rocket science to mounting a scope and a bench is not required I usually do my in my lap and believe me I have mounted many. But there are some things to consider if you do it yourself or take it someplace. Torque value is one thing not that a good even snug + half twist won't do the job but if your manufacturer's specs say 15 or 20-inch lbs it's a good idea to get that right.

So make sure who you have working on it does that correctly also you have to make sure it's adjusted to correct eye relief, Your eye relief not the guy's who is mounting the scope. Take in consideration your primary shooting style is it for bench or hunting and if for hunting do you carry a pack or wear thick clothes your eye relief should be adjusted for that. Provided you have a quality set of rings and bases and that your receiver is in spec there should be no reason for lapping.

 
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I appreciate everyone's feedback. I have plenty of tools...except the bubble level and rifle bench. I don't plan on buying a bunch of stuff to mount the scope since this is my only hunting rifle and I have no plans of adding scoped rifles to my inventory in the future.

I probably should have phrased it as more of a "cost/benefit" question. Without a rifle bench would it be worth fiddling for two hours or pay someone $50?

@dangerranger60 the new scope has a shallower bevel so the current mount and ring location aren't going to work. I'll need to buy a longer mount so the rings can be in the proper position.

I'll most likely start and see if I can mount it myself. If I get flummoxed I'll take it to a smith.

Thanks everyone.
Do it yourself, learn the skill.
Let me know if you want to borrow a level and torque wrench.
 
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I appreciate everyone's tips and encouragement

Do it yourself, learn the skill.
Let me know if you want to borrow a level and torque wrench.
That is generous of you. I have a good torque wrench. If I can borrow your level that would be a big help
 

osprey

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One last thing I will offer is regarding tools to get the reticle level. I have the wheeler scope level kit and it works well to get rifle level and have a constant reference to level even when scope is in mount. Where I see most people go wrong is after leveling rifle and placing clamp level on barrel, they place the small level on top of elevation turret cap and level scope to match the level on barrel. This is the wrong way to approach leveling the reticle in most cases. I have found damn few scopes where the reticle is actually in lockstep with the elevation cap. Many caps are not completely flat either and are more convex. The proper way to do it is with the rifle level, match the vertical portion of the reticle with a plumb line you hang across the room. Of course if all you are ever going to do is shoot out to 200-300yds it will matter not, so slap her in the mounts get reticle close by eye and tighten her down. This is how I used to do it and it was mostly ok. Now I give every scope mount the full monty. I check ring alignment and lap rings for better contact with scope surface. I level scope to rifle and use a torque wrench to properly torque the fasteners. I am not a big fan of loctite except in a few select cases. Carry on.
 
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