Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Motorcycle license

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Oregonhunter5, Apr 26, 2013.

  1. Oregonhunter5

    Oregonhunter5 2C IDAHO Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,158
    Likes Received:
    2,748
    I have a question. I've got some interest in getting an old enduro motorcycle to pop down to the store in. Nothing to go fast on, just an old school bike.
    So, question is, how hard is the license to get? I have been riding dirt bikes since I was a youngster.
    Thanks
     
  2. jfw

    jfw Clackamas county Active Member

    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    44
    It's pretty easy. I did it through team oregon. You don't have to do DMV test and it helps save on insurance
     
    gryghin and (deleted member) like this.
  3. Swedish K

    Swedish K SW Washington Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    1,943
    Likes Received:
    1,231
    I don't recall how difficult it might be - I've had my motorcycle endorsement since I was 16 in Colorado - transferred when I moved x2
     
  4. gryghin

    gryghin Beaverton Active Member

    Messages:
    194
    Likes Received:
    34
    I second the Team Oregon Endorsement, I had a Honda Interceptor back in the 80's but had to sell it before getting married. Decided to get my endorsement after not riding for 20+ years, no problems.
     
  5. JAFO

    JAFO OR, USA Silver Supporter Silver Supporter

    Messages:
    556
    Likes Received:
    148
    Take the intermediate class and not the beginner class if you go with Team Oregon (provided you are over 21). All new riders under 50 have to take one of the courses (next year under 60). You won't be as bored with the IRT. The beginner's class (BRT) is mostly for people who have never ridden a motorcycle from what I understand. Also, intermediate is only one day.

    TEAM OREGON Motorcycle Safety Program ? Rider Training and Skill Development
     
  6. Brutus57

    Brutus57 Skagit County Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,427
    Likes Received:
    5,687
    I rode dirt bikes as a kid, then started riding on the street at age about 14 years ago. 1st streetbike CB 750K6, 1976. I practiced, practiced rode about 5 months with a permit then took & passed the test. A few months later took the Beginner MSF course in WA to get the insurance break. Good deal, only $50.00 way back then for the course. Got the VTX 1800 a year later and within the year took the Intermediate course here where you use you bike. I recommend both. With an Enduro you shouldn't have a problem. Two of us passed, me on the 750 and another guy on a friend's 200 Enduro, a late 50s, early 60s guy failed miserably on an HD Ultra Classic and a noob girl on a VLX 600 Honda failed as well. If you've read the book a few times and practice the riding course (I went out the night before and used styrofoam cups instead of yellow cones... you should ROCK it. The bigger the bike the tougher to pass. I got a 96, missed a 100 cause on the downshift and stop I downshifted as I stopped...Tester asked me and I couldn't tell a lie.
     
    jbett98 and (deleted member) like this.
  7. Oregonhunter5

    Oregonhunter5 2C IDAHO Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,158
    Likes Received:
    2,748
    It's a full day?!! Yikes.
     
  8. drew

    drew OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,052
    Likes Received:
    970
    The BRT takes even longer. The testing portion itself takes a few hours. You're watching other people ride most of it.
     
  9. JAFO

    JAFO OR, USA Silver Supporter Silver Supporter

    Messages:
    556
    Likes Received:
    148
    8 hours in one day for IRT. 15 hours spread out over three days for BRT. There is some time spent in the classroom before you ride.
     
  10. spider

    spider Hillsboro Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,278
    Likes Received:
    66
    BRT is a pretty fun 3 days class, but for your skill probably try the IRT since its only 8 hours. Classes fill up quickly so better get on it.

    I never rode any type of motorcycle in 2011 when I traded into a 900cc Kawasaki Ninja, BRT gave me the skills and confidence to ride, I haven't gone below 900cc and i'm only 2 years into my experience.
     
  11. Simonpie

    Simonpie Portland Active Member

    Messages:
    294
    Likes Received:
    148
    Once you have a little time under your belt, consider a track day at PIR or Grass valley. The liitle enduro won't cut it, but a lot of bikes will. it will open your eyes to how much more your bike will do than you ask of it. Check out PSSR or 2fast track days.
     
  12. teflon97239

    teflon97239 Portland, OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,044
    Likes Received:
    3,323
    Have a blast riding. That's why we do it.

    But from the perspective of someone riding since the 1960's, there's nothing wrong with a healthy dose of paranoia too. Assume they're ALL blind/stupid/distracted/drunk/stoned and out to get you. Enjoy that brief flash of satisfaction and superiority when they actually try and you're already reacting safely. Maybe stash a spare pair of clean skivvies under the seat for those special moments...

    Your #1 Enemy:
    "OMG dude. Lemme call you back. There's a guy in a helmet on my windshield and he looks pissed!"
     
  13. WhyteCheddar

    WhyteCheddar East of Moscow by the Willamette Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,415
    Likes Received:
    413
    The DMV test is a piece of cake. You have go schedule it in advance. Practice your low speed turns eta. No feet on the ground. It might help to go practice the course if you live close enough to the DMV.
    Team Oregon is a good idea if you have the time. The insurance benefits may be minimal depending on your personal circumstances.
     
  14. sealine

    sealine Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    340
    Likes Received:
    283
    Just a word of advice when you're going to sit down and sign up for one of the Team Oregon classes. Be honest with yourself about your motorcycle riding skills when you're trying to decide to either take the basic or intermediate course. Riding a dirt bike in the woods or around the family farm is all fine and good, but riding a street bike on pavement and having to apply the principles/skills that Team Oregon teaches can be a whole new world for some.

    I have two co-workers who just took the basic class, a few weeks apart from each other. Both of them "had previously ridden dirt bikes as a kid." They each spent a weekend of their time (3 days), $180 dollars of their money, and both of them walked away from the class with nothing to show for it because they failed the course. One of them failed the riding skills portion and the other failed the written portion.

    If your only reasons for taking the Intermediate course is because the class period is shorter and its a few bucks cheaper, you might be setting yourself up for failure.
     
  15. Oregonhunter5

    Oregonhunter5 2C IDAHO Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,158
    Likes Received:
    2,748
    This may set off a bunch of comments, but here it is.
    I promise, I won't ride this bike more than 2 miles from my home.
    I will never own a Harley, or a rode bike. This is just a fun thing.
    I know I know, most wrecks happen near home. I had a MAJOR MAJOR wreck on a CBR600 in college. Wasn't my bike. I was really really out of control in college. To be transparent, I missed a corner, in a canyon in northern Utah, going 110 mph, with no helmet and shorts on.no license, no insurance, nothing. STUPID! I am paranoid about any bike, that is just a street bike. That's why I'm looking at an enduro. I know it sounds strange, but that's just me.
    Enduros have there own set of issues being light weight and all.
    I feel like I'm skilled at the advanced level on dirt bikes. Grow up on the nasty trails of the coast range, and rode fast and hard in the deserts of northern Nevada as an adult. Rode 3 days a week. But yes, it's not pavement. So do I just hit the DMV, or do team Oregon, Given my experience, but untamed college years. Lol
     
  16. sealine

    sealine Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    340
    Likes Received:
    283
    Oregon law now says if you're 50 years old or younger, you're now required to take a Team Oregon class to satisfy the written and riding skills test. Once you get the Team Oregon card, you take that to a DMV and they will add the motorcycle endorsement to your license.
     
  17. teflon97239

    teflon97239 Portland, OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,044
    Likes Received:
    3,323
    I read somewhere that most accidents happen within 2 miles of home.

    So I moved.
     
    bellarum and (deleted member) like this.
  18. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    6,447
    Likes Received:
    7,645
    My problem with enduro type bikes is the type of tires that come on them. They are semi knobby and really are not suited for hard slick pavement.
    I somehow talked my parents into letting me buy a brand new 71 Yamaha 250 enduro on the easy payment plan when I was only 17.
    After running it into a couple of ditches on sharp curves, I switched to a more road friendly tread and that help keep me alive that summer.
     
  19. Oregonhunter5

    Oregonhunter5 2C IDAHO Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,158
    Likes Received:
    2,748
    Was the pavement wet? I don't do rain.
     
  20. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    6,447
    Likes Received:
    7,645
    As a matter of fact, it wasn't.
    Both times it was a little bit of gravel from the side of the road. Might of well have been marbles on the road.
    If you are going to ride on the road, put some quality road tires on the bike.