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Mosin Nagants? What's the deal?

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by Dyjital, Jun 11, 2010.

  1. Dyjital

    Dyjital Albany, Ore Flavorite Member Bronze Supporter

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    I'm learning.... bear with me.

    What's the deal with the Nagants? What's so good about an older rifle like that? I know what they were used for buy why are they still floating around?
     
  2. Bazooka Joe

    Bazooka Joe Lower Yakima Valley Well-Known Member

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    I'm actually more curious about these now, too. I've read a lot of people saying they are decent battle rifle for the money, but then the other day on that Top Shot show one of the shooting pros couldn't hit the 100m target with it, which makes me think there must be something unusual about it.
     
  3. eldbillbo

    eldbillbo clackamas New world samurai and a redneck none the less Bronze Supporter

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    they are cheap average price starting at $80

    they are still cheap to shoot comparred to .223 .308 7.62x39 ect

    they can bring down a elk (comparable to a .308)

    fun to shoot for the above reasons

    they are historical, the only rifle to fight against itself and win.

    they are great as is or can be sporterised or dinked around with

    they are fun at parties and discos

    and read this
    http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinHumor.htm
     
  4. raftman

    raftman Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    It's quite simple. They're durable, reliable, low/easy-maintenance, battle-proven rifles, they also shoot an affordable and widely available round that offers decent performance (comparable to 30-06). They're also a ton of fun to shoot. What makes them yet more attractive to folks is they're still widely available for under $100, that is, you can get such a rifle for less than the price of a crappy, used single-shot .22LR rifle.
     
  5. trainsktg

    trainsktg Portland OR Well-Known Member

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    Firstly, just to be anal, the M91 rifle and all of its subsequent variations is generally refered to as a 'Mosin' not a 'Nagant'. 'Nagant' is usually used when referring to the M1895 seven-shot Nagant pistol of Belgian origin.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nagant_M1895

    The simple answer to your question as to why they are still around is that they are an extremely robust rifle with decent accuracy potential and an interesting history. They are in fact still in use on the battlefield today, and not just by poor indigent guerrilla fighters either. The current-issue Finnish Defense Forces Tkiv-85 military sniper rifles are made with Tsarist-era Mosin Nagant M91 receivers. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7.62_Tkiv_85

    If they are in anyway intriguing to you, wait for a $99 sale at Big 5, or contact Coctailer here on the boards and get one. If you are like me, you won't be disappointed and you may become addicted.

    Yup, that about sums it up :) .

    Keith
     
  6. el gringo loco

    el gringo loco PDX Member

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    Dude, for less than $100 you can own a gun that was used to kill Nazis (aka the lowest form of life ever to inhabit the planet earth)! What's not to like?
     
  7. Dyjital

    Dyjital Albany, Ore Flavorite Member Bronze Supporter

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    I figured that they were just a cheap collectors item.

    I had no idea that they are still a solid workhorse.


    Crazy white guy: that's a valid point.
     
  8. shoggoth80

    shoggoth80 Greater Seattle Area Member

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    Cheap, very robust, high powered rifle. Also, there is the historical factor in there. They are still around because they don't break easily (I've owned 4 or 5), and because there were some odd 17 million produced over the years (this might just be the 91/30). Actual M91s, and Dragoon era rifles are pretty collectible. Finnish rifles command a premium over most Russian/Comm Bloc guns. The Finn rifles are about the most refined of the Mosin/Nagant actions.
     
  9. darkminstrel

    darkminstrel PDX Well-Known Member

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    My Big5 $79 special hits clays at 200m with iron sights. Punches holes through 2cm steel. Makes a fireball that can defoliate the ground in front of me 2m out.

    And for $200 you can roll out and buy the rifle plus 440 rounds to shoot through it.
     
  10. torpedoman

    torpedoman land of corrupt politicians Member

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    the other guy hit his first shot. Not the fault of the gun.
     
  11. torpedoman

    torpedoman land of corrupt politicians Member

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    they are very good rifles mine is a tack driver with handloads good for anything you would use a 30-06 or 308 for.
     
  12. trainsktg

    trainsktg Portland OR Well-Known Member

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    Not seeing the show, I suspect a bias. With open sights, a decent refurbed Russian Mosin is (at least with my bad eyes and self-taught hands) capable of 4 moa 5-shot with good surplus ammo from the prone supported position. Any 'shooting expert' should be able to zero his rifle with just a few shots and be able to keep them in a smaller group than I'm capable of all day long.

    Keith
     
  13. darkminstrel

    darkminstrel PDX Well-Known Member

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    ...assuming the action screws and barrel bands are tight. The ones being used looked like well-used Century refurbs.
     
  14. Dyjital

    Dyjital Albany, Ore Flavorite Member Bronze Supporter

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    SO what are the important things to look for when scouting out these rifles?

    What are the good things to look for and what are run away things?

    Considering selling a rifle to pick one of these up, and since I know nothing about them......
     
  15. darkminstrel

    darkminstrel PDX Well-Known Member

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    Good crown, splits in the wood, rifling(though cosmoline can obscure a good barrel), trigger slop, matching numbers, tight bolt fit. In that order.

    If you're going to refinish the rifle I'd ask you purchase a more common variety. If you want it as a keep-sake collectible then research markings and such before you go in to buy.
     
  16. Ballistic

    Ballistic Salem, Oregon Active Member

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    How they shoot is hit or miss. Some of them don't shoot all that well; say 6 MOA. But others are better than your eyes. A lot of it depends on the ammo.

    The Finnish M39 are well known to be fantastic shooters. The last Mosin 91/30 i bought is also fantastic. I posted my range report here

    http://www.northwestfirearms.com/forum/showthread.php?t=31581

    and you can see that i can do 2 MOA at 100 yards with surplus ammo. At 300 yards almost every round would fit in your chest. Not bad for a $100 69 year-old rifle and 25 year old ammo. (I don't think i can shoot better because i can't see any better than that.)
     
  17. toobigtofail

    toobigtofail PDX Member

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    I would say that you want a rifle with good, strong, square rifling. A little darkness in the grooves won't affect accuracy, but a bright, shiny bore is a good selling point, if nothing else. Some people find the non counter bored rifles more desirable. I think that in general, non counter bored rifles are better than counter bored ones, but it probably isn't as big a deal as some people seem to think. Matching numbers without "scrubbed" or ground off or lined out numbers are more desirable in terms of collecting value.
     
  18. unionguy

    unionguy Portland Active Member

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    I had two M91/30's and an M44, cheap and goodly accurate. Solid as a tank. I did sell mine, but mostly as an effort to consolidate calibers and make more room in my safe. They do kick like a mule, though. So, don't get one if that bothers you.
     
  19. shoggoth80

    shoggoth80 Greater Seattle Area Member

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    Bear in mind, like with all guns, they can be picky about ammo. Bulgarian light ball stuff tends to not shoot as accurate in my experience, while the Russian is alright... but Polish and Czech are typically some of the best surplus varieties. Bulgarian heavy ball IS a hoot to fire, and is fairly accurate... especially in the carbine Mosins.

    Always check your action screws to make sure they are tight, as they sometimes loosen up in shipping, or due to differences in humidity.

    Make sure your crown is good, don't sweat arsenal repairs in the stock. If you end up with sticky bolt syndrome, it isn't the end of the world... nothing a shotgun bore brush, large patches, and some polishing compound doesn't fix. Or ballistol/brake cleaner/gasoline to cut out the dried cosmo that might be hanging out in the chamber.

    If recoil is a bit much for you, get a slip on butt pad. Simple as that.
     
  20. DSbur

    DSbur Vancouver WA Member

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    I can tell you that with surplus copper-washed 147gr light ball ammo that the $100 arsenal-rebuild 91/30 I just got from Coctailer on this site will do 2MOA at 100yds on the bench, open sights. Granted it shoots 6" high...

    Stay away from the lacquered-painted cartridges and use the copper-washed stuff. The lacquer tends to stick the cartridge in the less-than-perfect chambers after firing. Hammering away with a mallet on the bolt isn't a good idea. Also, the light ball ammo is what these were designed for, not the heavy-ball stuff, fwiw...

    Trigger pull is awful, but the rifle is absolutely bullet-proof. I refinished the stock and it looks great. Clean it after every range session as the surplus ammo is corrosive, but it's only KCl so hot water or windex or Hoppes works just fine.

    Now if anyone out there in Northwestfirearms-land can help me find some stripper clips locally....