Moratorium on hunting

Messages
275
Reactions
808
I grew up in a poor place at a poor time.
My good friend Bill who had four siblings was often fed poached deer.

Finally one day his father was caught and fined $100.

When the Judge fined him, he made the comment. ''Pretty expensive deer wasn't it''?
To this he replied. ''I figure about a dollar a deer Your Honor''.
I mean, Bill's dad made a pretty funny comment, I'll give him that - but implicating oneself in the poaching of 99 more deer (in front of a judge no less) doesn't strike me as the best idea in the word... :p
 

The Heretic

Messages
19,446
Reactions
45,395
I would say that hunting season should maybe be postponed until there is rain in a given area.

There are a LOT of idiots out there. I just spent almost a week away from home because some idiot landowner decided to have a weenie roast in the middle of a windstorm and in the middle or fire danger season, and I was lucky - I feel bad for all the landowners who had acreage/trees burned up. I hope the idiots get sued big time.

And yes, I know, most hunters are not idiots, but right now we don't need one idiot out of ten thousand hunters starting another fire.
 
Messages
7,165
Reactions
22,267
I mean, Bill's dad made a pretty funny comment, I'll give him that - but implicating oneself in the poaching of 99 more deer (in front of a judge no less) doesn't strike me as the best idea in the word... :p

As I remember he did catch more grief for his comment.

And what that Man did , he knew was wrong.
But he never took an ounce of charity.


Hell. Back then they didn't hand out food like today.
 

Siglvr

Messages
1,620
Reactions
2,122
I'm not a fan of not letting the scientists who we are already paying to do that job NOT do their job we are paying them for. Especially if it involves masses of uneducated proles like me spouting my unedumacated mouth off what amounts to stupid knee jerk opinions.

For instance, a few years back ignorant voters in Oregon said: "NO MORE HUNTING WITH DOGS" for cougars. Since then instead of cougar hunting being a money maker for Ore. fish and wildlife, the fish and wildlife dept have been literally paying with our tax dollars to have cougars hunted by paid hunters who hunt with cougars with dogs. Literally paying to have cougars hunted by hunters with dogs. It's somewhere far beyond stupid, and not likely to change anytime soon.

Here's an idea I have for Oregonians, lets make anyone who voted YES to ban hunting with dogs by hunters pay for it via an annual assessment so that their ignorance can be revisited on them annually and personally.
 

RVTECH

Messages
8,966
Reactions
14,558
Here's an idea I have for Oregonians, lets make anyone who voted YES to ban hunting with dogs by hunters pay for it via an annual assessment so that their ignorance can be revisited on them annually and personally.
I agree - considering WE as gun and ammo buyers already pay an excise tax of 11% as per the Pittman-Robertson act of 1937 which provides aid to States for management and restoration of wildlife.

SO those who voted to BAN the hunting of Cougars with dogs should as well pay an additional tax to make up for any losses they created as well as additional expenses of the contract cougar hunting.

I would have loved to see what would have happened if the ballot clause were to mention:

'By voting yes on the banning of cougar hunting with dogs you will, as an INDIVIDUAL voting for this, be assessed an additional 11% in taxes annually'

Ya think they would have still voted yes?
 

Grizzly_A

Messages
940
Reactions
98
Agreed to those who posted before me....animals flee the area when in danger...yes some will get killed due to the fire, but there will be plenty that are just temporarily displaced. They don't have "homes" in the human sense of the word, and can find forage and cover in other areas. They will also be back once the tender sprouts start growing.

In some parts of the state deer will roll in ash piles to get rid of ticks and mites. This was observed and reported by firefighters/hunters who were working wildfires. I don't know if this is the "norm" but fires are a part of the survival equation for animals.

I personally saw a racoon in broad daylight bugging out as the smoke got thicker last week. Again, anecdotal evidence, but shows that animals know something isn't right and will flee/move.

In many cases, the forage afforded and thinned forests will benefit animals. This will clear out choked meadows and establish more light to the forest floor. Unfortunately, based on previous fires in the last 20 years, I'm guessing the total loss of the trees, creating dead stands of timber. Unfortunately, the "management" of the forests has been POOR, with heavy fire suppression and not allowing small fires to cut down the understory yet keep the trees alive. So we will have sterilized soil and dead stands of timber.

I'm in favor of allowing harvesting the burned stands of timber, and then replanting. No reason to let it go to waste. (Leave wilderness areas natural) As a benefit, some soil will be turned over to facilitate germination, roads will be rebuilt/opened/established, and the land will be replanted because that's responsible.

We should not shut down hunting in the state. The state needs to stay the course and start adding better science, vs legislation. Poachers are lawless individuals, legislation will not change that, only tougher penalties.

I don't know how many fires have been started by "hunting bullets" WHILE HUNTING, but I can't imagine it's very many.

Steel tipped, tracers, etc have caused fires, but those using them were not "hunting." Improperly managed campfires, vehicles driving through fields, and improper incendiary device usage with hunting ammunition (ex. shooting propane canisters) is MUCH higher than a hunting bullet....fired at a game animal....starting a fire.
 
Messages
450
Reactions
590
While this idea seems well intended, it may likely be the opposite of what needs to be done in regards to game animals displaced by Oregon's massive fires this year.

Back in 2014 and as a result of the Carlson Complex fire in Washington it was necessary to quickly thin the deer population in the region due to the animals loss of habitat driving them into agricultural areas and leading to population density problems when the displaced animals bunched up with other members of their species in areas that couldn't support that number of animals. This increase in local population can lead to things like more starvation, environmental damage, animal disease, and conflicts between humans and animals as they migrate to human inhabited areas.

Here's some links to a few articles that go into more detail about this and similar situations:

Wildfires impacting big game & how to track fires

Washington wildfires destroy mule deer habitat

That all being said - I'm not an expert on this topic, and this is all just my layman's understanding from research I've done in the past.

Aside from the two links he provided, most deer and elk survive wildfires quite well. Some die, but not in large numbers. Plus, next spring all the burned areas will be booming with critically important feed ... early seral habitat that has been desperately lacking on most of our federal forests.

The fires, in the long run, because of a lack of logging on federal land, are a good thing for deer and elk.
 

bbbass

Messages
12,435
Reactions
26,355
I'm not a fan of not letting the scientists who we are already paying to do that job NOT do their job we are paying them for. Especially if it involves masses of uneducated proles like me spouting my unedumacated mouth off what amounts to stupid knee jerk opinions.
In my experience, there is relatively little diff between the edjumacated idiots and the uneducated proles.

The uneducated spout opinions based on bar talk, coffee chats, fireside chats, hunting forums, light reading, etc, and are often wrong but sometimes right. The educated publish considered opinions and make regulations based on research, but often misinterpret data, have incomplete data that they act on anyway, draw wrong conclusions, are driven by agenda or money to the program/state, make bad regulations, fail to regulate, fail to fund farmers efforts to keep elk away from haystacks, etc.

An example is that years ago, ODFW and USFS decided to demand that logging companies clear out the creeks and rivers in the areas they logged, at the company's expense, ostensibly to benefit the fish. Based on what studies????? Later, they found that the fish numbers were much reduced due to loss of riparian habitat. Then they spent taxpayer money, and still are, to replace logs that were hauled out of the river, Grande Ronde river locally, replanted trees, shrub, and grasses on the banks, and demanded more money and help from the few logging companies still in biz after the Spotted Owl fiasco and subsequent strangulation of the industry.

And it seems like every time we get a new/fresh batch of college grads at ODFW and USFS, they write a bunch of new poorly thought out regs and policy changes just to make their bones.

Of the two, educated idiots and uneducated proles, which is the most dangerous or has the most negative impact???
 
Last edited:
Messages
77
Reactions
47
All ODF land is closed, and as far as I can tell so are all the timber production lands, that pretty much just leaves private land, so its basically closed for now. That being said I don"t agree with a moratorium on hunting, maybe some new limits on tags (non resident tags in particular that way residents and those affected have a better chance at a hunt), but definitely no moratorium. I know of several families that rely on game meat to survive, a moratorium will only hurt these people and will probably turn more than one person to poaching.

Disclaimer: I am currently waiting and watching for an opening as I am very much dependent on wild game making up my families diet this winter, if no openings we will buy beef and hopefully waterfowl season will supplement.
I think south of cottage grove is open.

“All BLM-administered land within the Northwest Oregon District east of I-5 is closed to the public.Members of the public may not enter closed areas, and all uses—including hunting and dispersed camping—are prohibited. This temporary closure covers the portions of Lane, Linn, Marion, Clackamas and Multnomah counties which lie east I-5, west of the Cascade Range, and north from Cottage Grove to the Columbia River. In addition, BLM-managed public lands in Lincoln County are closed, with the exception of Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area. Popular recreation spots including Fishermen’s Bend campground, Wildwood recreation site, Alsea Falls recreation site, Shotgun Creek day use area, and the Row River Trail remain closed to the public.”
 

UPCOMING EVENTS

Lead Farm Precision Rifle Match
The Lead Farm
34006 Gwinn Rd, Prosser, WA 99350, USA
Arms Collectors of SW Washington Gun Show
Battleground Community Center
912 E Main St, Battle Ground, WA 98604, USA
Rimfire Challenge Dec 12th @ DRRC
Douglas Ridge Rifle Club
27787 OR-224, Eagle Creek, OR 97022, USA
Albany Rifle & Pistol Club (ARPC) Gun Show
Linn County Expo Center
3700 Knox Butte Rd E, Albany, OR 97322, USA

LATEST RESOURCE REVIEWS

  • Sportsman's Warehouse - Albany
    5.00 star(s)
    Good products at good prices with friendly and knowledgeable staff!
    We like to visit the Albany location as it's closer but have been to several others and they have all been great!:D
  • Umpqua Survival
    4.00 star(s)
    Easy NFA transfer
    I had a silencer transferred through their shop. The paperwork was quick and the staff helpful and friendly. Whilst waiting, I did see a nice...
  • MK Tactical
    5.00 star(s)
    Awesome staff
    Being new to the area and having just made an online purchase of an AR lower, I opted to use MK Tactical as my FFL, without knowing anything about...
  • J&B Firearm Sales
    5.00 star(s)
    Good local shop
    Picked up a rifle yesterday from J&B. This was the second or third gun purchase over the last few years from them. I always enjoy stopping by...
  • H&K Gun Shop
    5.00 star(s)
    The only place I have found 9mm in stock
    I’ll admit I didn’t even know this place existed, as I don’t tend to go into Forest Grove often. But it’s a giant (looks bigger from the...
Top Bottom