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Goodknight

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A friend recently mentioned that during the Obama regime smokeless powder was required to be manufactured with a shortened or set shelf life. That new powder does not last long periods of time. Can anyone shed light or (hopefully) debunk this rumor.
 

osprey

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Sounds like urban myth to me but maybe with all the new additives for temp stability and less flash, shorter shelf life is the result?
 

oremike

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No one is telling me that the powder or primers I buy have a shelf life, and I buy a lot of both being a manufacturer and all.
 

thorborg

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Urban myth or not, programmed obsolescence is a very real practice. Though not likely dictated by any dictator, instead less honest business economics to keep sales up. The computer industries are masters of it though though programing methods. The filament light bulb for one has been doing it since the 1960's by reducing the filament size for faster burn out instead of fat ones that could be lasting nearly forever. Besides early burnout / break down, other methods to increase volume and promote sales is regularly done by many fast food chains and the like when they discontinue things for a time but regularly bring them back thereby tricking the customers to over load on them when available believing they will disappear again. McDonalds' and Burgerville are notorious for this (among many others).
All that jabber aside, I find it hard to believe the powder industry follows those practices or their sales volume will be waning any time in the future. Especially when only a few businesses make powder, but businesses many use it. There may even be safety and legal issues involved were it to be so. Still, when things are difficult to prove, advantages will be taken.
 

oremike

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Look at it this way, there has to be a long term consistency with powder and primers. There is no "best used by date" on any ammo. How many here have shot Korean war era with no issues?
 
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McDonalds' and Burgerville are notorious for this (among many others).
Mmmmmmm McRib sandwiches.

the-mcrib-is-the-deadbeat-dad-of-sandwiches-rents-duethursday-6978601.png
 
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The computer industries are masters of it though though programing methods.
As a retired s/w engineer with 30+ years experience, I mostly disagree with this assertion.

For applications, compatibility is mostly determined by what the underlying OS supports, the frameworks that are supported, etc. - a couple of years ago Daimler had to mandate to the dealers to use 64 bit Windows because the Java version we needed to use/support would not run on 32 bit Windows. The reasons were security & bug updates for Java, and the fact that most dealers were using "hi-def" display devices (higher resolution - 3K to 4K minimum) and to scale the UI components to not be tiny on those displays required Java 9+. Since the majority of computers in use at the time were 64 bit, Oracle decided at the last minute to no longer support 32 bit Java going forward, so Java 9+ only supports 64 bit OSes.

It percolates up. It is cost - it costs a lot to support multiple versions of apps, dev frameworks, and operating systems - plus hardware. It is the price of progress - it isn't about making old systems obsolete so that you have to upgrade - I still have and use computers that are 10+ years old, but some newer apps won't run on them.
 

gmerkt

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All that jabber aside, I find it hard to believe the powder industry follows those practices or their sales volume will be waning any time in the future. Especially when only a few businesses make powder, but businesses many use it. There may even be safety and legal issues involved were it to be so. Still, when things are difficult to prove, advantages will be taken.
I agree. If for no other reason, the matter of liability. Because once packed into loaded cartridges, a pre-programmed rate of deterioration could cause dangerous failures later. It might not be as simple as a failure to go bang.

The rumors of reloading components having shortened or pre-planned deterioration have been floating around for years. Without having any basis in fact that anyone seems to be able to confirm. On the side of industry, for the reason I put forth above. From the standpoint of "heavy handed government control," wouldn't it be simpler for the Dark Side to ban the materials altogether?
 
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