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I want to move out to 200 and 300 yards this weekend but I don’t want to waste ammo just guessing on this.
My Ruger 556 MPR is zeroed in at 100yards.

When I change to 200 yards will I automatically be shooting 4” low at 200 yards? (I read this somewhere)

Is this the right idea on the adjustment- if it is 4” low I would adjust my scope turret for up/down —-1MOA @ 200 yards is 2” so if i am 4” low, I would adjust 2 MOA or 8 clicks And i should be back in the middle of my target? (scope is 1 click 1/4 MOA)

Can I just use the lines in my reticle to do the adjustment? count the lines and aim high/low instead?
 

Joe13

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I want to move out to 200 and 300 yards this weekend but I don’t want to waste ammo just guessing on this.
My Ruger 556 MPR is zeroed in at 100yards.

When I change to 200 yards will I automatically be shooting 4” low at 200 yards? (I read this somewhere)

Is this the right idea on the adjustment- if it is 4” low I would adjust my scope turret for up/down —-1MOA @ 200 yards is 2” so if i am 4” low, I would adjust 2 MOA or 8 clicks And i should be back in the middle of my target? (scope is 1 click 1/4 MOA)

Can I just use the lines in my reticle to do the adjustment? count the lines and aim high/low instead?


You can ‘hold over’ for quick shots but if your bench shooting then you can go 2 ways.

1. Aim at the top of the target at 200 and then figure out how far your bullet dropped - then adjust the scope and see how close you got, may take 2-3 shots to dial it in.

2. Assume the drop and try to guess the dial before your first shot and then adjust from there - it will also take 2-3 shots to get it perfect.

At a 4” drop you will still be on paper so it’s dealers choice imo.

Once you have your scope set for 200 then do the same to get to 300. Record your scope changes so you can go from 100 to 300 without having to redo your work.
 

RicInOR

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Do you know what kind of reticle you have?


How to adjust depends upon type.


If you are not attempting to reset for the longer shots, I recommend learning to hold over.
a 25 yrd & 100 yrd point of aim = point of impact is one choice, and for an AR that is often a good one.

100 & 400 is another popular choice. If you live in the country rather than suburbia it might be better.
 
Nothing is automatic until you shoot. Always verify the “guesses”. If you wish to zero at 200, then you can adjust your zero. Otherwise, until you’re shooting at longer ranges, get to know what your gun actually does. Butcher paper and a 3 inch dot is a good way to start. Have about 2 feet of paper under the dot.

If you really want to learn trajectory, NEVER use Kentucky windage until you’ve learned. ALWAYS use the same point of aim.
 
A 55 grain projectile going 3000 FPS zeroed at 100 will drop about 3 inches at 200. So the answer to your first question is no. There is NO "automatically" anything. At 200 yards there isn't going to be a drastic difference, meaning an inch or so either way depending on projectile weight and velocity but as you stretch out even farther things change exponentially. Find a bullet drop calculator. There are a few phone apps that do this well or books are available too.

Your understanding of MOA and adjustment is correct, but things like windage, elevation, humidity and temperature affect the projectile so again, nothing automatic.

The lines in your reticle were predetermined for a specific bullet weight and velocity. Unless you know that information, they are reference points at best. Even then, most reticles I've used with BDC built in are "rough and dirty" and will never replace correct turret adjusting.
 
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FWIW, I've always zeroed my ARs at 50 yards...puts you a little over an inch high at 100 and back on at 200...for shooting Practical Rifle, it works very well, pretty much a point blank hold out to 250 and you'll hit the target.

This, like anything else, has a hundred different opinions.

As to your question, the guys above are spot on, will be a little trial and error with your individual rifle/load.
 
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I want to move out to 200 and 300 yards this weekend but I don’t want to waste ammo just guessing on this.
My Ruger 556 MPR is zeroed in at 100yards.

When I change to 200 yards will I automatically be shooting 4” low at 200 yards? (I read this somewhere)

Is this the right idea on the adjustment- if it is 4” low I would adjust my scope turret for up/down —-1MOA @ 200 yards is 2” so if i am 4” low, I would adjust 2 MOA or 8 clicks And i should be back in the middle of my target? (scope is 1 click 1/4 MOA)

Can I just use the lines in my reticle to do the adjustment? count the lines and aim high/low instead?
The most precise way to do this is borrow or buy a chronograph.

Chronograph will tell you the feet per second speed of the ammo you are using through your gun. Not the estimated speed the ammo said or the internet says.

Once you know your FPS you can calculate your drop at any distance. From there you can adjust your scope or simply hold over the drop that has been calculated.
 
i zero all my 5.56 rifles at 50 yards. i do this because generally you will be about an inch and a half high at 100 and dead on at 200ish.

here is a trajectory chart i found on the 50 yard zero for xm193(55gr) ammo.

C4A9A558-2C1B-498D-9CAF-2DF157823BCB.jpeg
 
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I zero at 25m which gives me a 300m zero at the same time. All one need know is where the POI will be at 100m and 200m with that zero and make a slight visual adjustment. I have notice while the elevation adjustment works well doing this, I do have to make further windage adjustments for the actual 300m POI. Some ammo boxes have to zero data on the side or back of the box.
B30E5A8D-5D23-4D30-A9BF-D444C150CC23.jpeg FF618C81-FDB6-4515-B28E-7DFF3F3875E1.jpeg
 
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Do you know what kind of reticle you have?


How to adjust depends upon type.


If you are not attempting to reset for the longer shots, I recommend learning to hold over.
a 25 yrd & 100 yrd point of aim = point of impact is one choice, and for an AR that is often a good one.

100 & 400 is another popular choice. If you live in the country rather than suburbia it might be better.

It’s a drop zone 223/5.56 BDC reticle
What do you mean by hold over?
 
Using the hash marks in the reticle to adjust for windage/elevation. BDC stands for Bullet Drop Compensator. Since that optic is specific to ARs, each mark below the crosshairs is probably for an additional 100 yards with a 55 grain bullet. If the rifle is zeroed at 100, the horizontal hash below the crosshairs is probably for 200 yards. The next for 300 and so on. I’m not familiar with that series of optics so it could vary a little.
 
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Every one here is Tracking true, so I have little to add! For my self, I use the 25M-300M zero on scoped carbines to get what I need, and the Modified point blank zero on Iron Sight carbines to get my desired POI!
This has lots of advantages, but takes practice learning your holds for your optic, and your adjustments for your irons!
 
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Do you shoot rifle with both eyes open? I’ve been reading tips for consistency while bench shooting and i run across the tip of keeping both eyes open..
It's something to learn/practice once you are comfortable with your set up, and really only works for Iron Sights anyway, so for an optic, it isn't needed or of any benefit!
 

Joe13

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It's something to learn/practice once you are comfortable with your set up, and really only works for Iron Sights anyway, so for an optic, it isn't needed or of any benefit!

I do find that once closing one eye gets tiring it can be relaxing to open both on a scope.
 
For iron sights ...I like both eyes open...
For Scopes....I keep one eye closed....
When shooting its good to keep at least one eye open...unless you like shooting in the dark...:eek::D

Some good advice in the above posts...
I can only add...once you find a safe and effective shooting form...stay with it , while you practice.
Andy
 

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