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I'd be leery of burning automotive fuel in a "white gas" appliance like these, but my greatest concern toward doing so would be burning such inside the confines of a tent or box-camper. Longevity to the appliance would be a secondary concern.

Automotive fuel has a whole lot of additives that "refined for appliances" cooking fuel (white gas such as Coleman-branded and others) don't have. The lead is gone. Not much else.

With apologies to Capital One, "What's burnin' inside YOUR tent?"
 
I'd be leery of burning automotive fuel in a "white gas" appliance like these, but my greatest concern toward doing so would be burning such inside the confines of a tent or box-camper. Longevity to the appliance would be a secondary concern.

Automotive fuel has a whole lot of additives that "refined for appliances" cooking fuel (white gas such as Coleman-branded and others) don't have. The lead is gone. Not much else.

With apologies to Capital One, "What's burnin' inside YOUR tent?
Non ethanol is white gas or did you skip over some replies by chance?
 
I use mine every day. Granted, I'm a heretic, did the unthinkable, gutted them and filled them with magical electric pixies.

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Non ethanol is white gas or did you skip over some replies by chance?
And sewage effluent is water.

I apologize if my replies were somehow inadequate toward conveying such. I used quotes with "white gas" describing such appliances to allow for other brands of cooking fuel other than Coleman.

Yes, automotive fuel of the unleaded type has been referred to as "white gas" for decades.
,
If the belief is that it is an equivalent to cooking appliance fuel (in regard to additives and refinement) then admonishments toward "skippiing over" might be re-directed.
 
Does "Coleman Fuel" go bad?

I got rid of 4 out of five Coleman stoves, and 3 out of five lanterns, a few years ago. I had a small Canadian Coleman two-burner that had neve been more that fired. I've picked up some gallons of fuel for if the power goes out.
 
Does "Coleman Fuel" go bad?

I got rid of 4 out of five Coleman stoves, and 3 out of five lanterns, a few years ago. I had a small Canadian Coleman two-burner that had neve been more that fired. I've picked up some gallons of fuel for if the power goes out.
Depends. The old shtuff... it may loose a bit of potency, but doesn't really go bad and perfectly useable. Worst case, you mix it 50-50 with fresh fuel and you'll never know the difference.

On the other hand... coleman fuel in the last 5 or 10 years... if opened, that stuff can die on you pretty quick. I don't know why, but a newer can of fuel I had open with only 1 stove tank out of it and not much over a year and a half later it would barely ignite. At the time I did some asking around and that seemed to be a pretty common occurrence with newer coleman fuel. From coleman... they say that an open can only has a shelf life of 1 year, if stored properly. Go figger!

Dug up another really old rusty can from probably 25+ years ago that was only half full and it fired right up!

As to the OP.... unless you are going to fully fettle and restore them, I would leave them alone and sell as is. The type of folks that are interested in that vintage of gear are likely going to do a near full breakdown and fully fettle it up themselves so... they are looking for a deal and anything minor done just to get it firing won't have much value.

You might check out the "classiccampstoves" online forum if you're looking to sell. A good place to get values and find buyers that will likely pay more than "garage sale" hunters. (Note: gas lanterns are just as welcome there.)
 
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And sewage effluent is water.

I apologize if my replies were somehow inadequate toward conveying such. I used quotes with "white gas" describing such appliances to allow for other brands of cooking fuel other than Coleman.

Yes, automotive fuel of the unleaded type has been referred to as "white gas" for decades.
,
If the belief is that it is an equivalent to cooking appliance fuel (in regard to additives and refinement) then admonishments toward "skippiing over" might be re-directed.
I meant clear, not white. I was just trying to point you back to some of the previous comments/quotes.
 

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