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MEMORY TEST: Need Help Stevens Favorite 1915

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by rhtwist, Apr 10, 2010.

  1. rhtwist

    rhtwist South Florida Member

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    Howdy,
    Just got a Stevens Favorite 1915 Take-down model with coil hammer spring. I need to test anybodies long term gunsmithing memory.
    First I was using standard 40 grain WWB .22LR and I was getting about approx. 25 % misfire. Had to pull back hammer and fire it on the same cartridge and it would then fire. I've noticed that the extractor/ejector does not come out and remove cartridge until you have almost reached the end of the lever throw and the it will be forced out by the action of the lever. If you just drop the block partway the ejector will stay in place with the rear of the barrel. I've also noted that if I put the barrel on with the action closed it will leave a 1/32 gap between the front of the receiver and the rear of the forend. If I install and tighten the barrel with the action open and the ejector in the ejected position, I can get a flush fit and the action seems to become tighter as you close it.
    How abnormal is that? Would it affect the misfires, which all occurred with the barrel and receiver flush. If not what other areas should I look into. I owned a .25 Rimfire Stevens favorite 1915 and it did not act the same way. When you lowered the block the ejector would spring out easily by itself. Wish they made .25 rimfire and I still had it, much better condition than this .22LR. Thanks for any recollections and assistance.
    rhtwist
     
  2. madderg

    madderg Salem oregon Member

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    A real good thorough cleaning to get years of collected gunk from the working parts and springs should clean up your problem.
     
  3. rhtwist

    rhtwist South Florida Member

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    Hello madderg,
    Thanks for the response. But this was after an pretty exhaustive cleaning. Also remembered that the .25 Stevens Favorite had a half cock notch. This one doesn't. It is full back or fully forward.
    I appreciate your assistance, so far you're the only one to answer. Take care.
    rhtwist
     
  4. Hill

    Hill pnw Member

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    Look close for any sign of firing pin indentation around the rim of the chamber, if you haven't. Sometimes a misfiring dent can be almost invisible.

    Then look at the firing pin indent to the cartridge casing itself. A healthy dent indicates sufficient firing pin length and hammer spring force.

    Look for signs of rubbing or hanging up the hammer. On the sides of the hammer - a burr or damage to the rotating part can slow the hammer sometimes.

    I'd have to pull out one of my Stevens's to get more ideas of possibilities.
     
  5. torpedoman

    torpedoman land of corrupt politicians Member

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    your in need of a few new parts the ejector should snap out near the bottom of the stroke. but the gun should go to half cock and stay there after closing, new spring will cure the mis fire problem
     
  6. rhtwist

    rhtwist South Florida Member

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    Hello torpedoman,
    Thanks for your response. Will look into getting a new hammer spring. Still wonder why there is no half-cock on this rifle?
    rhtwist
     
  7. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Torp's assessment of the ejector I believe is correct. The ejection should happen very last, at the bottom of the lever throw. As for the misfiring, if you are certain the barrel is butted hard against the receiver, torp's suggestion of a new hammer spring could be it, but I'd take the "scattergun approach" while there, and replace the firing pin as well (they really take a beating over the course of what could be 80-100 years). Your half-cock problem will be readily evident when you disassemble the action and look at the hammer: both notches crisp and sharp? Sear on the trigger likewise? And I believe the trigger should also have a "forward" tension spring. If weak, the trigger may fail to engage the half-cock notch on the hammer, and yet still have enough tension to grab the full cock notch.

    You are lucky, in that parts for that gun are mostly available (even as reproduction/new). More than one gunsmith in the country specializes in restoration of these, and manufacturing of parts. "New" Favorite parts may well work in some applications. Even if the barrel is butted hard on the receiver in regards to the takedown feature, the block and/or channel it rides in may be worn and not achieving good tight headspacing.

    Oh. also try some different ammo. 22LR rims/brass can vary greatly as to softness and thickness, and primer compound sensitivity. Maybe all you need is a cartridge with a slightly thicker rim and/or softer alloy.