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Medical aid survival book suggestions?

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by clearconscience, Sep 17, 2015.

  1. clearconscience

    clearconscience Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    Hey all,

    I asking if anyone has suggestions on a book (preferably easy to read) that gives good info on basic medical care, trauma care, and first aid in survival situations.

    Also if anyone knows if good places around portland to buy survival medical gear. I want to put together my own kit for the family. I like actually seeing it in person to know what i'm getting.

    Thanks,
     
  2. Joe13

    Joe13 NW of Vancouver Opinionated & Blunt Bronze Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    Try powells books for boy scout or red cross books. I don't have aspecific book, but I can tell you from personal experience - if you don't train and practice those skills no book in the world will help with the serious stuff.

    CL sometimes have phama reps that are clearing out their inventory.


    Edit - I also keep holistic/naturopathic and plant based med books. Tylenol and the like will be gone quick if it all goes to hell.
     
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  3. slimer13

    slimer13 Deer Park Well-Known Member

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    Where there is no doctor
    Where there is no dentist

    Alot of survival stores carry them also I usually see them at gun shows.
     
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  4. erudne

    erudne The Pie Matrix PPL Say Sleeping W/Your Rifle Is A bad Thing? Bronze Supporter

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    Medicine for mountaineers
    there is one for ship's captains as well
    First Responder's /EMT text books (buy used at Powell's or Amazon)
     
  5. Medic!

    Medic! What just happened? Has eagle eyes. But cant remember what he saw. Bronze Supporter

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    I can't read.

    So I joined the Army and let Uncle Sam make me into a Medic. It was great!

    But I still can't read.:(
     
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  6. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    This ^^

    Survivalist's Medicine Chest
    Ditch Medicine
     
  7. CascadiaPdx

    CascadiaPdx SE Portland Member

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    Also, NOLS wilderness first responder books, good stuff.
     
  8. Bazooka Joe

    Bazooka Joe Lower Yakima Valley Well-Known Member

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    The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way By Dr. Joseph Alton, and Nurse Amy Alton

    AMP-3 is in Portland. I don't know if they have a physical location, though. Great gear, though. They do list "office hours" on the website. Dr. Pruett gives good suturing/wound classes, too.
     
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  9. BEN LILLY

    BEN LILLY Lincoln City, OR NRA LIFE MEMBER Bronze Supporter

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    I have an old Air Force medical training manual. Everything from first aid filling teeth.
    I would also recommend "current diagnosis and therapy" your doctor might give you a copy that is a couple years old.
     
  10. MrNatural

    MrNatural Oregon Well-Known Member

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    My experience is that medical emergencies seldom happen within stone's throw of your library and those big medical manuals are a real bear to pack around.

    So my very favorite is a pocket-sized manual: Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness & Travel Medicine by Eric A. Weiss. Its cheap enough to get a few copies. One in the car. One in the BOB, one in the home large med kit.

    Also keep an eye open in used book stores in the technical areas for:

    Gray's Anatomy
    - very handy lavishly illustrated book. It helps a LOT to have a roadmap of body details. Very common.

    Dorland's Medical Dictionary
    - or other of this type - very handy for deciphering technical terms you may read in other medical books.

    Consider also

    Emergency War Surgery
    (NATO handbook)
    The Ship's Medicine Chest And Medical Aid At Sea
    Physician's Desk Reference
    (PDR) - drug identification and useage.
     
  11. Medic!

    Medic! What just happened? Has eagle eyes. But cant remember what he saw. Bronze Supporter

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    Reference books are great for sickness.
    But you should learn first aid and trauma care. If you want to save a life NOW!

    You don't carry a book on Martial arts. Just in case your in a fight do you?

    Plus. When you have both your hands in a persons thigh. Trying to control bleeding.
    It's kinda hard to turn the page!;)
     
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  12. clearconscience

    clearconscience Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    I did a explorer post SAR for a couple years when I was 14 certified in SAR through Columbia county. We learned a lot of first aid, a lot I retained, I'm CPR and AED certified, but would love to know more trauma care.
    I have to respond to medical emergencies at work here and there.
    But i don't want that kind of practice.
     
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  13. rick benjamin

    rick benjamin USA, Or, Damascus Secure the drama Silver Supporter 2016 Volunteer

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    Stop the bleeding
    Start the breathing
    Protect the wound
    Treat for shock
     
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  14. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    ABC is what I learned (in the USCG)

    Airway
    Breathing
    Circulatory

    Now they are teaching CAB for CPR

    Circulatory
    Airway
    Breathing

    But of course, serious bleeding is a problem that needs to be considered along with the ABCs.
     
  15. clearconscience

    clearconscience Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    Yeah probably won't make a difference if you start pumping blood when it's spurting out a artery.
    Just making it bleed faster.
     
  16. CoastRange57

    CoastRange57 Western Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    They do not have a store front, all mail order. I was an EMT II back in the early days of emergency medicine and have stayed up with it, my wife was a OHSU nurse for 17 years. AMP 3 stuff and training is the best there is, and I have seen a lot of program of the month things. David's training as an ER physician has allowed him to develop what we consider the best materials and training programs available. Our 2 sons, one a full time paramedic, the other a FD Lt. also feel his stuff is the best. We own a lot of his kits , plus assembling our own trauma bags we carry in the cars with us.

    No amount of reading will substitute for field training, hence the requirements for ER rotations and clinicals and ride along's to get your certificates. Our son had to complete 18 months of paramedic training to get his ticket. Emergency medicine is bloody, messy, traumatic and sometimes you just cannot do anything. You have to be prepared to deal with some pretty nasty situations. I have worked car accidents with traumatic amputations, head trauma with blood and spinal fluid coming out of every hole in the body, massive cardiac arrests, chain saw injuries to major arteries, (usually fatal), gun shot wounds and suicides, drug over doses you name it.

    You could get some EMT basic training that will cove the basics, and give you rudimentary skills and knowledge. The training now days is aimed at the paramedic level and EMT Basics are pretty limited in what they can do.

    Needless to say, in our group we pretty much have the medical side covered.

    Good books are a good start, and certainly better than doing nothing.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2015
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  17. U201491

    U201491 Well-Known Member

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  18. rick benjamin

    rick benjamin USA, Or, Damascus Secure the drama Silver Supporter 2016 Volunteer

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    Sure like seeing folks interested in first aid.
    You are 0.01% of the thundering herd.
    Most will pass by
    Some will pause to lookie
    A few might try to help
    One acts from training
     
  19. erudne

    erudne The Pie Matrix PPL Say Sleeping W/Your Rifle Is A bad Thing? Bronze Supporter

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    As a person that started learning wilderness survival before I hit my teens I often forget that there are 30YO+ types out there that don't even know the Rule of Threes.

    8 years back I took a group of veterans into the woods. I had given them the usual Introduction, they all had their personal survival gear, I provided a huge pile building materials to build a shelter and our afternoon trek had provided lots of pine sap/kindling; it was an adult version of a Fall Boy Scout Outing.
    That night I learned that the US NAVY does not teach it's Swabbys any form of wilderness skillso_O
     
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  20. CoastRange57

    CoastRange57 Western Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I learned survival training at age 15 in several Civil Air Patrol encampments and youth survival. 5 of us and two instructors had to do 4 nights and 5 days in the Three Sisters Wilderness in December. Never forgot a thing and am glad I did.
     
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