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Marlin 1894 CST Questions

So, I am finding this one interesting:

70438_1894_CSBL_Threaded_right-no-Silencer.png


Stainless steel, .357 Magnum, 8+1 magazine capacity, threaded for a can, and weighing in at 6½ pounds. The point of acquiring one would be to run it suppressed with a 9㎜ silencer that is currently in the battery.

Questions:

  1. Anyone know what the story is on currently produced Marlins? The last new one I bought was early 2008. Reports I'm seeing here and elsewhere are all over the map.
  2. I'll contact Marlin tomorrow, but can anyone think of why I couldn't swap the stocks for wood type?
Gracias.
 
I bought an 1895 GBL about three years ago. I haven't had one problem with it. It's a keeper. The stock is synthetic but it looks and feels great. It's a modern rifle with a modern stock. On this particular rifle I am fine with synthetic. It's tough, won't warp or split and resists scratches, dings and moisture.

70456_1895GBL_Right.png
 
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I've got a couple of 1894's in .357... It looks like they are making the loop bigger, Not fullsize cowboy loop, but bigger than the ones I have... What a sweet rifle.

Are you looking for a walnut aftermarket stock and forend? or am I misunderstanding?
 
Are you looking for a walnut aftermarket stock and forend?
Something like that or just swap a walnut stock from another Marlin, assuming it works. Not a showstopper by any stretch, just curious. Thanks.
 
I bought an 1895 GBL about three years ago. I haven't had one problem with it. It's a keeper. The stock is synthetic but it looks and feels great. It's a modern rifle with a modern stock. On this particular rifle I am fine with synthetic. It's tough, won't warp or split and resists scratches, dings and moisture.

View attachment 547663
Good to know. The last new Marlin I bought (1895 Cowboy in .45/70) was JM marked, but it required two trips back to the factory to make it run. How a lever-action can be screwed up, I do not know, but it was. That said, after the repairs, that thing was fantastic, though I sold it off for a variety of reasons, all unrelated to the rifle itself.
 
Something like that or just swap a walnut stock from another Marlin, assuming it works. Not a showstopper by any stretch, just curious. Thanks.
The only way to do it is to try it. Or at least photoshop it....:D
 

jbett98

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I've been contemplating buying one of these for the same reasons you stated. I have been waiting for a vintage Marlin with cosmetic issues to pop up for sale, but all I've seen so far are nice ones for around the same price as a new one like you pictured and I would then have to have the barrel threaded, which kinda ruins the resale value.
I guess I need to find one in a store and handle one.
Thanks for starting this thread as I thought I'm the only one thinking about this particular setup. Don't need it, just want it.
 
My original plan was to thread and buy a new can for the Rossi in .44 Magnum.* Then I realized one in .357 Magnum is good enough and is going to be a helluva lot quicker and easier to suppress because we already have a can for said. In a perfect world, such logistics wouldn't be a concern, but it most certainly be so.

* This one.
486816-622e1a63245d2e1fad5a972d95ca135f.jpg
 

AndyinEverson

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I was looking at newly made Marlin 336 the other week...
It had a somewhat rough exterior and the stock wood and wood work was less than stellar.

Kinda like what a Remington 870 express is to a vintage Remington 870 Wingmaster.

I am not saying that the new Marlin is not a good rifle , but just that the level of attention to detail in the fit and finish is not the same as with a older Marlin rifle.
Andy
 
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Some folks want craftsmanship and some folks want something purely practical.

Some Firearms take on a "spirit," for lack of a better word. They are cherished things and passed down from our folks, and wrapped up in memories of good times, hard times, and adventures.

Some have saved lives, some have taken lives, and some have just leaned up against the wall by the front door for as long as you can remember. They take on a personality after a while.

Ultimately, they are tools.
Like a Hammer, or a ratchet set.


But there can sure be something special about em.
 

11Charlie

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I so want a lever gun again. I haven't figured out what caliber, which one or shoot when I would use it but I want one. Miss having one in the safe. Should have never gotten rid of the one I carried in my truck in high school. :(
 

aasbra

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I've been contemplating buying one of these for the same reasons you stated. I have been waiting for a vintage Marlin with cosmetic issues to pop up for sale, but all I've seen so far are nice ones for around the same price as a new one like you pictured and I would then have to have the barrel threaded, which kinda ruins the resale value.
I guess I need to find one in a store and handle one.
Thanks for starting this thread as I thought I'm the only one thinking about this particular setup. Don't need it, just want it.
I was in the same boat. Looked for a used one to have someone shorten, thread, etc. for me. Ultimately, after considering the total cost involved, I went with one of these instead. I picked it up last year when they first came available. After a bit of work, I have been pleased with it so far. I detailed my initial impressions in a thread here.

Marlin is bringing back 357!

Only had it out to the range a couple times, probably 100 rounds or so through it. Shoots pretty well and no function issues so far once I smoothed up the loading gate/mag tube. Issues likely could have been my handloads with less crimp than factory rounds, but they feed fine in my other Marlin 357 (JM marked Cowboy). Fun to shoot suppressed.

The stock, I believe, is likely a laminated wood covered in a black textured paint. I didn’t care for it at first too much, but the utility of it it has grown on me.

jbett98, if your not able to find one in a store to check out, send me a message when your going to be over on my side of town (Tigard area) and maybe we could meet up somewhere for you to see and handle it.
 
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Reno

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I missed the boat when they released the CST. They were $900 and I couldn’t come to terms with that much coin at the time they finally hit online stores shelves.

Now, like most Marlins, they have all but dried up into nonexistence.

Seems like they do very limited runs, if any.

If I see one online or in a store again, I’d likely not pass it up the second time.
 

jbett98

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Every morning I scour the internet looking for a project 30/30 or a .357 Magnum lever action, especially the department store brand marked Marlins and Winchesters.
Back in the day they were readily available for almost half, but somehow the word got out and they are scarcer then the named brand guns.
 

284guy

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Every morning I scour the internet looking for a project 30/30 or a .357 Magnum lever action, especially the department store brand marked Marlins and Winchesters.
Back in the day they were readily available for almost half, but somehow the word got out and they are scarcer then the named brand guns.
There’s a Ted Williams model at Capital pawn in Salem. I believe it was sub $300.

I flip a lot of lever guns from estates, yard sales, etc. Right now lever guns are hot, especially in the south. Biggest issue here in the Northwest is that there are too many Fudds. They don’t know what JM means, or why it’s more desirable, they have no money to buy anything, and when they do, they ruin good guns. They think old guns are junk. Or “grandpa guns”. Recently had a marlin 357 cowboy offered to me. Guy had to threaded and put a flash hider on it because he couldn’t afford the can he wanted. Of course he insisted it was still worth 1K. Even the Rossi’s, everybody wants one, but nobody is willing to even pay wholesale for them. This young generation of gun owners has a lot to learn. Of course I can’t bash them too much, they trade Grandpas old lever guns for entry level ARs. That makes me happy.
 

PNWguy

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Maybe somebody on the Marlin owners forum has done it already. Worth a search.
Marlin Firearms Forum
Buying a Remlin these days is a crap shoot. I spent a lot of time on that forum trying to figure out how to fix my 1894 I bought a couple of years ago.

Bottom line is that it is better, but still doesn't feed 100% reliably.

I bought a beautiful used JM Marlin 1894 in .357 as a ranch gun in 2007 for $400. Couldn't bring myself to subject it to outdoor work and it sat for a few years as a plinker and backdoor gun. Sold it in 2013 for $1000.

Bought a Remlin 1894 in .45 Colt to use as a camp carbine and discovered the vast difference in quality between the old Marlins and the new ones.

Won't waste time here going into the details as there are always a couple of people who swear that the new ones are just as good as the old ones. Some folks just can't discern quality; no use arguing with them.

Just go to the Marlin forum and read.

The best advice is to NEVER buy a new Marlin without a very close inspection and function test. Make sure the sights are on straight and not canted to the side. That's a common issue. Inspect the bore with a light to make sure the rifling isn't degraded or missing the last few inches of the barrel. That has cropped up a few times. If you take it apart, chances are you will break screws like I did because even the screws they use now are of a lower quality and break easily.

I will never buy another Remlin. But then again, I don't go to the casino, either...
 

284guy

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I’ll agree with you on Remlins. I did buy a 1894 cowboy limited edition in 45LC. I think the fact that it was a limited edition made the quality better. Everything on it is top notch. I consider it the winning magazinebucks ticket.
 

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