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Marlin 1893 30-30

Discussion in 'Rifle Classifieds' started by DoktorT, Mar 13, 2010.

  1. DoktorT

    DoktorT Chewelah, WA Member

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    Marlin model 1893 30-30, long rifle, octogon barrel, matching numbers on forearm, stock and reciever. Folk art checkering on forearm. Folkart carving of deer and bear on stock. No doubt the furniture was refinished after carving. Blue is as fine as could ever be expected on any rifle this age. If it was reblued, it was done before I got it. Straight shooter and very functional when last fired way back when in my teens. I got it from a widower in the mid 60's. Serial No. 159804. Might be as fine an original model 93 as you will ever find.

    Got to ammend that last line. Did some research and found one someone had listed for $21,500. An original jewel. A few others better than mine for $2500 to $4500. Those are asking prices. I did see several sold for over $1000 that were round barrel or carbines or typical, not nearly as good as mine. So, let's say $1500 for mine.

    And one more detail. This is NOT a take down model.

    503-648-3548
    Hillsboro, OR
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2010
  2. aflineman

    aflineman Both South of Eugene and East of Portland. Active Member

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    Is this for sale? If so, how much do you want for it? You might want to follow the rules of the for sale section and post a price.
     
  3. k7grc

    k7grc Banks, Or Active Member

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    Is it marked 1893 or Model 93?
    Marlin Safety on receiver?
    Special smokeless on barrel?
    to bad about the wood,, original replacement wood for these are very hard to come by, and lot of $$.
    I'm a member of Cody museum, I think your serial number should be in there data base. I'll find out Monday, they provide build date and configuration..
    I'd like to look at it some time next week.
    thanks
     
  4. DoktorT

    DoktorT Chewelah, WA Member

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    Top of receiver= Marlin Safety
    On barrel under rear sight= Special Smokeless Steel
    Top of barrel= Marlin Fire-Arms Co. Newhaven Connecticut, USA
    and Patented Oct. 11, 1887, April 2, 1889, August 1, 1893

    On the tang of received screwed to the stock= Model 1893

    The folk art is very good to some and very bad to others. Not at all unusual for someone sitting out the winter in a cabin in the woods back in those days.

    Thank you for playing. Banks ain't 10 minutes from me so let me know if you want to come check it out.
     
  5. aflineman

    aflineman Both South of Eugene and East of Portland. Active Member

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    Thank You. More than I can afford at the moment, but a fair price for a piece of history.
    If their is any way you can post photos, that would be cool (and probably help your sale).
     
  6. DoktorT

    DoktorT Chewelah, WA Member

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    Can be seen this weekend at the Portland EXPO gun show, at the Beaver Creek Armory booth, near center of the layout. Take all the pix you want.

    Further info:

    I purchased this arm in the mid 60's from the widow of the prior owner. I used it to hunt deer for several years. I don't think I put more than 50 rounds through it for sighting in, target practice and hunting. Last time I actually fired it would be 70 or 71. Subsequent to that, I tore it down for thorough cleaning and to replace the ejector spring. When I had it apart I noted the serial No. on the receiver was stamped into both the forearm and stock. Matching no's. This makes me suspect that when it was produced, the furniture was still being hand fitted on the assembly line. I just can't think of any other reason they would bother to stamp the wood with a matching no. Upon reassembly I tested the feed from the magazine and had no problems with cycling ammo when using just a proper deliberate push and pull on the lever. The sights were painted with finger nail polish so can very easily be removed with simple acetone on a rag. I consider this arm fully functional for original intended uses and purposes.


    I have done nothing at all to the finish of the iron or wood since I got it. It looks evident to me that whomever did the carving of the wood did add a finish. I cannot say with certainty whether the blueing is original or was reblued before I got it. I am nothing like an expert, but it certainly looks to me to be original. I have never traced the serial no. to determine year of manufacture.


    With open sights and a proper rest, it is extremely accurate. I was able to hit stubby bottles at 100 yards 10 for 10, all day long. Trigger pull and release is just ding dang dandy. It just suggests to me that the bore and riflings are in fine order