Making your own 300AAC yes or no

aasbra

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I don't do 300 AAC, but I do several other cases where there is significant case shortening and neck + shoulder reforming.
Brass consistency and annealing are key elements to your success.
After researching the topic, I found what P7M13 concluded was the consensus.

I elected to purchase brass for the BLK rather than convert it. I’m only feeding one bolt gun, so I don’t need lots of brass.
 
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Easy
Sort your brass, there is a list of brass that will give acceptable neck thickness without reaming.
Cut brass to approximate length (harbor freight mini chop saw and 300 blk fixture)
Size brass (standard 300 blk reloading dies)
Trim to final length (use whatever case trimer you prefer)
Load

Easy

The pain in the as is sorting brass by head stamp.
 
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DizzyJ

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Just be careful of the thickness of the brass. I’ve read where that can cause issues with clearance when using .223/5.56 brass.

This is why I went with factory 300 BLK a few years back.
 

SHPD_Retired

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I have converted a lot of 223 brass. Here is a list of some brass to use and some not to.

300BLK-Table-1.jpg
 

Goodknight

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What is your time worth?
Here's reconditioned brass from Optics Planet

Top Brass .300

And from Midway

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1021444848?pid=652842
I agree on the time worth piece! However self reliance and economic down turn empty shelves… and on and on. I want the technology. Similarly I want the casting technology complete with molds and equipment to load go to firearms!
But I’m really a upbeat guy!!! No doom and gloom here!!!
 
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I converted a lot of 223 to 300blk back when 300blk first came out and I couldn't get factory brass. I used R-P and commercial Federal brass with good success. I still have a some left. These days I consider it "disposable" brass since I don't have an annealing machine and don't have time to anneal by hand. I use it for pinking ammo or for situations where I can't recover my brass.

One thing I learned is that it is best to de-burr the case after you trim it before you run it in the sizing die. I was cutting my brass down with a jig in a mini chop saw. I had to send my sizing die back to Forster to have them polish it because it stated leaving scratches on the case necks. My theory is that the little burrs and bits of brass left by the chop saw slowly wore tiny scratches in the die over the course of running thousands of pieces of brass into the die. Haven't seen the problem develop again after I started de-burring the cut first.
 

DizzyJ

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I converted a lot of 223 to 300blk back when 300blk first came out and I couldn't get factory brass. I used R-P and commercial Federal brass with good success. I still have a some left. These days I consider it "disposable" brass since I don't have an annealing machine and don't have time to anneal by hand. I use it for pinking ammo or for situations where I can't recover my brass.

One thing I learned is that it is best to de-burr the case after you trim it before you run it in the sizing die. I was cutting my brass down with a jig in a mini chop saw. I had to send my sizing die back to Forster to have them polish it because it stated leaving scratches on the case necks. My theory is that the little burrs and bits of brass left by the chop saw slowly wore tiny scratches in the die over the course of running thousands of pieces of brass into the die. Haven't seen the problem develop again after I started de-burring the cut first.
It may have been caused by grit left behind from the cut-off wheel. Abrasives are never a good thing to run through a die.
 

Deavis

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I agree on the time worth piece! However self reliance and economic down turn empty shelves… and on and on. I want the technology. Similarly I want the casting technology complete with molds and equipment to load go to firearms!
But I’m really a upbeat guy!!! No doom and gloom here!!!
Well, that brass is like .32/rd.

Before primers got stupid I was loading moly 220 subs on my converted brass for .18/rd.

I could run 8/min thru the saw and 223 brass nearly grows on trees.
 

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