Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Magnum Primers

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Edmon, Mar 21, 2011.

  1. Edmon

    Edmon Battle Ground Active Member

    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    25
    Can Large Rifle Magnum primers be used in place of Large Rifle Primers when reloading 30-06?
    Thanks.
     
  2. tkdguy

    tkdguy Portland, Oregon Silver Supporter Silver Supporter

    Messages:
    1,098
    Likes Received:
    529
    I do all the time and they work great! tkdguy
     
  3. chainsaw

    chainsaw East side of Or. Active Member

    Messages:
    495
    Likes Received:
    113
    I would shy away from it if you are loading maximum loads.Magnum primers are a little "hotter"than standard primers.
     
  4. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,261
    Likes Received:
    3,072
    Typically you should follow the recommendation in your manual or other data you follow for reloading but as Chainsaw said they are a little hotter. If you have them to use up maybe back off a grain on the powder charge to compensate but I have read if you live in a cold or damp climate ALWAYS use magnum primers. Also it is a good idea to use magnum primers if your powder density is low in the case BUT if the load you are using is a 'magnum' load and calls for magnum primers definitely use them and do not deviate from the recommended powder charge. A good example of this is when using 296 powder in magnum pistol loads. 296 must be loaded as outlined in the manuals and with the recommended primer.
     
  5. BillCh

    BillCh Vancouver Active Member

    Messages:
    151
    Likes Received:
    43
    NO.
     
  6. HappyRoman

    HappyRoman Sherwood Forest Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    2,166
    Likes Received:
    120
    Typically Magnium primers are hotter than std primers, and rifle primers are supposedly HARDer than pistol primers. In a pinch if one substitutes, like in a Obamanation scare and no primers, then load down from Max load when using a MAGNIUM primer. Usually a Mag rifle primer will a account for upwards of 1 grain of powder. Also, test the load after loading 2 or 3, if your rifle likes them and works, no presssure signs.. you got another winner..
     
  7. Jamie6.5

    Jamie6.5 Western OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,198
    Likes Received:
    4,399
    Using ball powders they are often recommended.
    As others have said, start low and work up regardless of which powder you are using.
    I have a .270 recipe that uses them and is very consistent/precise. Sometimes they improve/reduce velocity SDs, and sometimes they make them worse.
    If you are thinking of switching over to them I would use a chronograph to help determine whether you have gained anything by using them.
     
  8. nubus

    nubus Guest

    As inferred but not directly stated, magnum primers will result in a change of PRESSURE.
    Hotter, colder, more powder, less powder, pressure is the key in every load that is bench tested.
    Magnum primers can ignite more of your powder at once and can greatly affect the pressure in the load.
    Merely reducing the amount of powder may not decrease the initial amount of pressure when ignited.
    You are changing more than just the amount of powder needed to propel the bullet at the same speed.
    In most loads that shouldn't be an issue, but if the load calls for standard rifle, that's how it was tested.
    Primers are readily available now, I would just use the suggested primer for the load you're working on.
     
    jer fly and (deleted member) like this.
  9. turq

    turq Molino,oregon Member

    Messages:
    294
    Likes Received:
    7
    I'll say you should not do it.

    Which powder? On a very slow powder maybe but most manuals will tell you which primer and for good reasons. Say you load up a powder now in March and the powder is effected by temperature[all are; except Hodgdon Extreme powders to a much lesser extent] THEN in July it's 95 degrees out, you leave them on the dash put up targets then bring to the line to shoot 'em and they are at 120 degrees. That magnum primer could make too fast a pressure spike...overpressure.
     
  10. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,261
    Likes Received:
    3,072
    Best advice from this thread.
     
  11. Shooter98

    Shooter98 McMinnville, Or. Member

    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    18
    I started using magnum primers for 25-06 loads. I have yet to see any signs of pressure increase on my loads. Then again, I stay in the middle of the load ranges. I also have not noticed any fps gains except when using the 75 grain hp's. My typical 100 and 115 grain loads never moved on the chrono.

    Now, what I have noticed is much less residue left around the neck of the brass and in the primer pockets. The burn seems much cleaner. I use IMR and H4350 powder only for that round.
     
  12. rickoshay

    rickoshay gaston or Member

    Messages:
    233
    Likes Received:
    2
    Most all reloading books start you out slow magnum primers might hurt anything but is they don't help why do it ?
     
  13. Shooter98

    Shooter98 McMinnville, Or. Member

    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    18
    The original question is can you use them? The answer is yes. The question wasn't should I use them, and why or why not. The reality is there is absolutely no danger in using a magnum primer. If you're loading a case so full that it creates a problem when you use a magnum primer, then you are too close to the danger zone even with a standard rifle primer.
     
  14. twa2471

    twa2471 Vermont Active Member

    Messages:
    109
    Likes Received:
    56
    Kinda experimenting with the thrill of eating a bolt arn't we ??? Spacific powders are designed for mag primers others aren't, I'm not a powder formulator but I do know it can increse pressures significantly. It will effect your accurcy too, and probibly not for the better. Powders preform best at there given burn rates and shouldn't be messed with. Please don't take chances. Best source for reloading specs is your reloading manual in the "Accy." section. These guys shoot hundreds of thousands of rounds a year and know what there talking about.
     
  15. moose

    moose northwet coast Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,160
    Likes Received:
    354
    Probably the best advice here. Use what is recommended for the reload.

    Yeah you can make allowances for and get away with using a mag primer for a standard. But going the other way, a standard for a mag, is very bad. (DADT).

    A good question would be 'Why go off reciepe?' If you don't like how the powder is being ignited by it's recommended primer, you should consider a different powder, not primer.
     
  16. Edmon

    Edmon Battle Ground Active Member

    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    25
    I have plenty of both primers. I am new to reloading and was curious if a magnum primer could be used for a large rifle primer. I will stick to what the manual says. Thanks all for the info.
     
  17. twa2471

    twa2471 Vermont Active Member

    Messages:
    109
    Likes Received:
    56
    Smart man !! For real though, I've reloaded for 30 years and it is really hard to beat the manuals accuricy specs they give. It's a great place to start till you find the elusive "Sweet Load" for that particular gun. And That's why we reload boys!! 2600fps cutting air or 2400fps cutting hair, consistantly, which would you rather have? PS I never really relished the thought of eating a bolt eaither !!
     
  18. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,407
    Likes Received:
    537
    The BIGGEST difference in Magnum primers is the thickness of the cup. They are manufactured this way to keep the higher "Magnum" pressures from blowing through when the firing pin hits them. Yes, they are a little hotter but then again, so are some standard primers. Not all are the same, some throw quite a flame.

    The standard practice is, when using Magnum Primers where a Standard is called for is to back off slightly and work the load up again. Some use magnum primers to make sure their stubborn powders light off reliably, especially under cold conditions.

    I load thousands of "Magnum Primers" in my AR Ammo. Rather than pay the high price for CCI 42's I use the Wolf Small Rifle Magnum primers. They even market this primer packaged as a ".223 Primer". The thicker cup helps prevent slam fires.

    Using the "magnum primer" I load 25.4 gr of AA2230 with a 55gr FMJ-BT. Speed is 3015 fps from a 16" bbl with a Mean Average Deviation of less than 15 fps.

    In summary, you can use a magnum primer where a standard is called for if you follow standard procedures for working up a load. DO NOT use a Standard Primer when loading magnum loads unless you like lots of gas coming back your way from a ruptured primer.
     
  19. Browning55

    Browning55 Seattle-Everett Area Active Member

    Messages:
    192
    Likes Received:
    65
    I agree with those who say be very careful - and work your way up - when using magnum primers unless data specifically advises. It's true the magnum primers have more brissance (or juice) and can increase pressures - varying with powder used. When loading data says standard primer there's probably a reason for it.
     
  20. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,407
    Likes Received:
    537
    Just an added comment:

    Using magnum primers in conventional rifle loads is often done when one is shooting in extremely cold conditions. We here in the NW don't see temperatures like Minnesota, Canada, or Alaska. Some handloaders will purposely use Magnum Primers to insure full performance in their rounds even though the ambient temperature is in the minus numbers.