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M-1 Carbine Value

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by Jerry, Dec 27, 2010.

  1. Jerry

    Jerry Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    I have a chance to get an M-1 Carbine from a fellow who's in a tight financial situation. I don't know anything about these rifles. I saw the gun for only a few minutes last month.

    It was made by the Inland Division of General Moters (as I recall) in 1942. No dings, scrapes, rust. He says it is in original condition and has not been redone at all. It belonged to his dad & may have been used by him in WW-2.

    Any of you folks have any idea of what a gun like this might be worth? He's wanting $400. Oh yeah, he's got about 20-30 boxes of factory ammo and some remanufactured ammo as well.

    Thanks for any info.

    Jerry
     
  2. Dell_dude

    Dell_dude Vancouver, WA Member

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    I'm certainly no expert, but I know a couple things.

    The fewer carbines were made by a contractor, the more valuable they are (like I.B.M. or Rockola). Inland being a division of GM, they made the most.

    Having no import marks is important.

    That being said, I don't recall seeing a non imported M-1 Carbine go for anywhere near as low as $400 in the recent past.

    They're currently listed on Gunbroker.com for between $625 (it's been worked on) to $1000.

    So at $400, it seems like it would be hard to go wrong.

    I don't know how much import marks take the value down. You might want to research that angle a little more, and check the gun for them.
     
  3. trainsktg

    trainsktg Portland OR Well-Known Member

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    Pictures are needed here. With M1 Garands, M1 carbines and '03 Springfields, it is hard to judge 'value' by such a brief description. So many have been reworked by both arsenals and previous owners that only a careful part-by-part inspection can hope to determine their true 'originality', hence their true collectors' worth. (As a side note, I don't believe it was common for servicemen to keep their issue weapons once they were mustered out of the service...but regardless, always buy the gun, not the story.)

    That said, with the ammo included, for $400 it is hard to go wrong on a civilian M1 carbine, let alone a WWII military issue rifle. If everything looks good, it'd be difficult purchase for me to pass up.

    Keith
     
  4. unionguy

    unionguy Portland Active Member

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    I'm no expert on M-1 carbines, but I've been casually watching them over the years for possible purchase, $400 for one that works and is in good condition IS a good deal, no matter how you slice and dice it.
     
  5. spengo

    spengo GLORIOUS CASCADIA Active Member

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    $400 for an M1 Carbine? Plus ammo?! BUY IT NOW. Or if you decide not to give me his phone number so I can buy it! :D
     
  6. Nwcid

    Nwcid Yakima and N of Spokane Well-Known Member

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    Buy Buy Buy.

    Unless it is a total POS and trashed you will always be able to resale it for that. This is before knowing the little details about that gun which can only make it go up from there.
     
  7. BSG 75

    BSG 75 Oregon Well-Known Member

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    It is worth more than $400, could be worth much more if it is an original bringback. Definitely buy it at that price.

    The second and third from the left below are Inland carbines. The second from the left is a Bavarian Carbine used by Germany and Austria during the Allied Occupation after World War II. The center one is an original late-war configuration Inland.

    flizrn.jpg

    After you get it you can PM me if you have any questions.
     
  8. thirtycal

    thirtycal Camas, WA Active Member

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    Damn those are nice. Love the first two on the left. Any closeups of ordnance cartouches on the stocks?

    -Thirtycal
     
  9. BSG 75

    BSG 75 Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Same order as the previous photo, left to right:

    Standard Products
    DSC03255.jpg

    "Bavarian" Inland carbine with an IBM (the computer company) stock marked BR-B (Milton Bradley [the board game company] for IBM). The stamp slipped and left a partial double stamp.
    DSC03259.jpg

    Late-war Inland. Someone marked the serial number with a grease pencil on the stock, probably during an inventory.
    DSC03261.jpg

    Winchester
    DSC03262.jpg

    I also have some other Winchester stocks. The first is hard to see in photos
    DSC03273.jpg

    the other is an early I-cut oiler hole stock with the early style Winchester markings
    DSC03266.jpg

    Last is an IBM carbine with an Underwood stock made by Marlin. It is hard to see but it is GHD over UEF with the Ordnance wheel, in a box
    DSC03268.jpg
     
  10. MA Duce

    MA Duce Central Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Not mustered out..but I would guess the number of issued weapons which were broken down and mailed home as units were demobilized must be in the high hundreds of thousands. Inventory control in a war zone is a practice in futility even today....in WWII it was non-existent. I know I........never mind.....:D
     
  11. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    I seen it?
    I'm sure that's what you was gunna say;)
     
  12. trainsktg

    trainsktg Portland OR Well-Known Member

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    Good point ;) .

    Keith