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Looking for Stock Repair

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by Ballistic, Mar 12, 2011.

  1. Ballistic

    Ballistic Salem, Oregon Active Member

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    I'm looking for someone in the Salem area who does gunstock repair.

    I have an Argentine Mauser 1909 with several deep hairline cracks. Basically, the stock is broken and is not safe to fire. This is to much for a total amateur like myself and would like a professional to do it.

    Can anyone recommend some reasonably priced wood workers?

    TIA!
     
  2. UncalledForGabe

    UncalledForGabe Aloha Or. Member

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    do you have any pictures of the crack?
     
  3. speelyei

    speelyei Willamette Valley Active Member

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    Pics would help. My friend was able to glue a single shot shotgun stock back together with an epoxy product. They were cracks that went all the way through the wood, which was very thin, that attached the stock to the action. That might be an option.

    I am a woodworker myself, i might be able to offer some pointers.

    Those 1891 Argentine mauser stocks are a real testament to the design and craftsmanship of the manufacturers. When you take out the barrel and action, look down into the stock at all that inletting and router work... I am sure the '09s must be similiar.
     
  4. Ballistic

    Ballistic Salem, Oregon Active Member

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    Here are pictures of the cracks. The receiver area is the worst and most critical. Next are the cracks near the crossbolt. Finally, there's another one near the barrel band. I think they can all be repaired by someone with the skill and knowledge.

    But, i'm not up to this kind of repair.:(

    receivercracks.jpg

    cracks.jpg

    Morecracks.jpg

    Rearbandsideview.jpg

    Rearbandtopview.jpg
     
  5. ZigZagZeke

    ZigZagZeke Eugene Silver Supporter Silver Supporter 2015 Volunteer

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    I have repaired a hairline crack in an antique rifle stock with two-part epoxy glue by carefully spreading the crack and injecting the epoxy with a hypodermic needle, then clamping the stock to hold the crack together for 24 hours. Afterwards, I was able to make the crack invisible by sanding with #600 paper and using Casey's Tru-oil to blend the repaired area into the existing oil finish.

    I don't believe that strategy would work with your rifle. I think the number, depth, and extent of the cracks I see in those pictures means the the stock is generally failing (unless they were all the result of one major impact, maybe). I think you could put a lot of work into fixing these cracks only to have new ones appear shortly thereafter. It might be worth a try, but I think I would try to find a replacement stock that was in better shape.
     
  6. turq

    turq Molino,oregon Member

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    If you could find some Micro-bed epoxy [2 part/brown] and drill some 1/8" holes to 'intercept' the cracks ; fill by pushing it into the holes with say a bamboo scewer . it will bond and stop the crack from spreading further hopefully. Oil is the enemy to the bonding. It couldn't hurt to try since the stock is gone if nothing is done. Good Luck
     
  7. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg WA Well-Known Member

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  8. Ballistic

    Ballistic Salem, Oregon Active Member

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    You called it! Only afterwards did i discover that that the barrel was bent! I think something with enough force to bend the barrel also shattered the stock.

    The barrel has been straightened and i repaired all the cracks i could find. I used two-part epoxy on the larger ones and super glue on the hairlines that couldn't be spread. I learned a lot about repairing cracks.

    If i can find a 1909 stock, i'd replace it to go shoot. It's a shame, it's an all matching non-import marked gun with the original finish and bluing.
     
  9. Ballistic

    Ballistic Salem, Oregon Active Member

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    Thanks for this link! I can't afford one right now, but i will bookmark these guys!