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Long term ammo storage

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by moriarty689, Oct 26, 2010.

  1. moriarty689

    moriarty689 Oregon New Member

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    In the process of packaging large amounts of ammo. I'm possibly going to be putting it in a cache down the road, but I also want something that if its in the outdoors for whatever reason while on the move, I don't need to worry about rain, snow, ect.

    Since my main two weapons will be .308 and 45 ACP, I'm using the latchtop plastic containers from walmart, putting 180 rds steel case 308 (9 mags) and 48 rds .45 (6 mags of 8) to have a combat load in each box. Using plumbers silicone adhesive for the lids to waterproof. Planning to put two small silica moisture absorbers in right before I seal them.

    Considering vaccum sealing each container for a final moisture barrier with a large Food Saver bag and spray painting them earth tones. I realize i'll probably have to cut the containers open with a sharp knife to get at contents but thats ok. Will be temperature controlling them as much as possible to hopefully get 40 years of storage out of them (young guy here ha) Any more suggestions?

    Walmart Mobile
     
  2. cyborg

    cyborg Oregon City Active Member

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    I would recommend metal ammo cans..... solid and waterproof. Easy to open and close as needed. Vacuum packing ammo packages inside. Should be good to go.
     
  3. fromotoc

    fromotoc Downtown Portland, OR Member

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    Yep +1 on the ammo cans. They've gotten pricier but can still be found fairly cheap at certain army surplus stores.
     
  4. deadeye

    deadeye Albany,OR. Moderator Staff Member

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    agreed on vacuum packing the ammo/mags first then no worries if the can degredates, it is only for stability/strength anyway. If you are worried beyond that the steel ammo should have the corrosion resistant seal on the primer and seat.
     
  5. simpleguy

    simpleguy Clackamas Active Member

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    Cool dry place........thank God we live in the NW, not as much humidity, we are so lucky.

    That said, 40yrs......vacuum pack w/dessicant, add to box, seal box.
     
  6. usmc

    usmc oregon Active Member

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    ammo cans and vacuum seal seam to be the consensus.make sure you get a good vacuum sealer. the one i used was a POS and it worked for 4 packages then went SH.also watch out for the vacuum sucking so hard that it makes the bullets puncture the plastic. not fun lol
     
  7. moriarty689

    moriarty689 Oregon New Member

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    Yeah gonna buy a vaccum sealer for my parents for Christmas and get extra bags and seal up my ammo heh heh. Thanks guys.
     
  8. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    I have done quite a bit of this in the past, and have a few notes:

    1) Leave the ammo in it's original box, this helps with identification, and also keeps the rounds from poking through the plastic, and prevents other types of mechanical damage.

    2) Put the boxes of ammo into plastic bags, or tubes (I have a bag sealer for my business, and buy the 5000' continuous plastic tube from uline) The tube, when sealed on both ends forms a bag. Foodsaver type vacuum bags are really succeptible to getting small tears in them, also, negative pressure will suck in moisture. Throw in an oxygen absorber packet, also from uline.

    3) place all of these packets into steel ammo cans, and then allow all of the ingredients to cool (perhaps place out on your back porch on a cool day). Unless you're somewhere with permafrost, the earth stays at an average 60 odd degrees year round. Cooling everything off before you seal the cans will allow them to be slightly positive pressure when sealed.

    4) Coat the outside of the ammo can in asphalt roofing sealer. This will prevent the can from degrading when exposed to water. Now find a good spot to bury stuff... dig your hole deeper and throw some pea gravel (about 6" or so) in the bottom of the hole. Put your cans on top, Layer some plastic on top of the cans and then back-fill.

    The biggest problems encountered when doing burried caches is water intrusion, and the mechanical force of the ground around the cache. This is enough to destroy most plastic, with the exception of water pipes which are designed for burial. However, most water pipes are either postive pressure, or no one cares if they leak water into them (sewer). You can use asphalt sealer on the plastic also, but the major issue is the plastic cracking, and plastic will also usually cause water to pool inside. The trick with doing pipe caches is to bury them on end, so you may only have to dig 6" or so, break the cap off, and then drag the contents out, rather than having to dig up the storage tube (which is now useless anyways).
     
  9. motohead185

    motohead185 Portland, OR Member

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    I would say if you going to cache some Ammo/Supplies find a plastic or metal truck box that locks, and also do what AM said. that will for sure keep all your goodies safe!