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Loading 30-06 and 270

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by TXHunter, Aug 13, 2012.

  1. TXHunter

    TXHunter Texas New Member

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    New to rifle reloading, I have done a lot of shot gun shells...
    I am trying to work up loads for me and my son. I have a Remington 760 pump in 30-06 and he has a Tikka T3 Lite Stainless in 270. I would like to use the same powder and primers to keep it simple and efficient. For the 270 we are loading 140 gr Hornady Interlock bullets and for the 30-06 we have 180 Grain Bonded Polymer Tip Spitzer Boat Tail bullets from Midway. We will be hunting deer and hogs in Texas, with all shots under 250 yards. Does anyone have a suggestion of a powder that will work for both calibers? Any personal load reccomendations would also be appreciated.
     
  2. joken

    joken Corvallis Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    IMR 4350 will get it done.
     
    elk311 and (deleted member) like this.
  3. TXHunter

    TXHunter Texas New Member

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    That was what I was thinking. Thanks for the quick response.
     
  4. 86k5krawler

    86k5krawler newberg,or New Member

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    H4831sc i use it for 140gr accubonds out of my 270 as for 30-06 theres good data for it
     
  5. Bravo4

    Bravo4 Polk County, OR Member

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  6. civilian75

    civilian75 Hillsboro, OR Well-Known Member

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    +1, supported by the Hornady Reload manual.
     
  7. iusmc2002

    iusmc2002 Colville, WA Active Member

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    I think this will be one thing that always mystifies me (albeit, easily done). The load data from Hodgdon starts at 175gr for the 30-06 with H4831/sc, but goes all the way down to 110gr for the .270. Why the heck is it like that? Same with H1000. My .270 loves it, but it doesn't even show up for the 30-06 until 200gr. I know there are other examples out there, but this is so strange to me. It's the same case essentially, but the load data is so much different. H1000 in the 300 WM goes all the way down to 110gr, as does the H4831/sc, why is it so much different for the 30-06?
     
  8. jjackffrost

    jjackffrost central oregon Active Member

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    49x4895x168 is what I use for my 30 06 good for 600y shots
     
  9. Jamie6.5

    Jamie6.5 Western OR Well-Known Member

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    It has to do with what is termed "overbore" calibers. IOW, case capacity to bore diameter/area.
    The larger the case capacity relative to the bore, the greater the pressure potential using fast(er) powders. So, to prevent overpressure, a slower powder, like H1000, RL22, Norma's MagPro etc. are used.
    The 30-06 case, when used with a .30 cal bullet doesn't risk higher pressures when used with medium burn-rate powders, and light-mid weight bullets.
    Load a 180 or 200 gr bullet in that '06 case and the pressure potential jumps up enough to warrant the slower powder.
    When you try to shove that same pressure potential down a smaller bore, like a .270 or .25-06, and the pressure spikes dramatically, even with lighter slugs.

    This involves the bore being the "expansion chamber" that the charge expands into as the bullet proceeds down the bore.
    Generally speaking, the larger the bore, the greater the bore volume (the larger the expansion chamber) and the faster powder you can get away with, and allow the powder charge to reach it's full potential.
    The '06 case works well on the .338-06 and .35 Whelen using BLC2 for instance, but BLC2 isn't recommended/suitable for the 25-06, even though it's the same cartridge case, and shoots much smaller, lighter slugs.
    The other factor is that slower powders need higher pressures to burn efficiently, as most slow powders rely heavily on r-e-t-a-r-d-ers like graphite to slow down their burn.
    Inadequate pressures cause a loss of efficiency, and therefore tend to burn "dirty," leaving lots of carbon (graphite) behind.
     
  10. iusmc2002

    iusmc2002 Colville, WA Active Member

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    Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaand now my head hurts :laugh:

    Thanks Jamie!