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Loaded up my first set of rounds at home, a few questions.

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Gas, Jul 14, 2010.

  1. Gas

    Gas Gig Harbor, Washington, United States Active Member

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    Without taking my head off, as to why I should stay with a single stage, please answer the questions below, some on another website are just pissing me off with their comments.

    I did 50 on the single stage and got tired real fast. So I went to the progressive and that is a kick in the pants.

    Here are a few questions: First off, I checked all my charges and weighed every bullet to make sure none were under or over charged. On the Hornady l-n-l sometimes the primers do not feed. I had the rod in the tube to keep the weight down, so not sure what is going on there. Next, sometimes the powder would not go into the brass because the actuator would stay in up and not come back down to reset. And last is not all the powder would make it into the shell.

    I am using the long tube for the powder actuator, and I am loading 45 auto. In the lyman book, it says the round should be 1.275, I am getting 1.210-1.220 on my rounds. I shot off a few and they all loaded and cycled just fine. Is it OK to be under that number by so much or should I seat the bullet a little higher in the shell? When I go to the Hodgen website it says a 230gr bullet should be 1.200, on the hornady website it shows 1.255, and my 230gr factory rounds are 1.265. Is the 1.275 max, and are my rounds OK or will there be too much pressure?
     
  2. Point356

    Point356 Southern Oregon New Member

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    First off, there is no reason to stay with with a single stage press when loading for pistols, they just allow you greater control over each step in the reloading process; in which makes more accurate ammo.

    For the issues with your press, did you fully disassemble your dies and remove the oil from the internal parts, this could cause powder to bind up in the drop tube. It would be good for you to take some time and fully disassemble your press and look closely at the priming system, look for rough edges and remove them with an exacto knife in the aluminum and plastic parts, the cast and steel parts will require a small round file.


    The seating depth for the projectile will vary with powder types and charge weights, seating too deep can cause the powder to burn to fast and increase pressures to dangerous levels. Leaving the bullet longer than Minimum Over All Length is OK so long as your firearm cycles reliably and the breach closes fully. MAX O.A.L is ultimately determined by your magazine and the chamber of the firearm. It's good practice to stay as close to Min OAL as possible to achieve the velocity and pressures listed for the specific load.
     
  3. Gas

    Gas Gig Harbor, Washington, United States Active Member

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    In my lyman book, it only gives a max OAL, can you show me a minimum and maximum data chart please?
     
  4. Gas

    Gas Gig Harbor, Washington, United States Active Member

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    I just got off the phone with hornady and they told me my seating is just fine. I was a little confused on the lyman book. It does not show a 230gr jhp, just a 225gr jhp
     
  5. Point356

    Point356 Southern Oregon New Member

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  6. Point356

    Point356 Southern Oregon New Member

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    Did you ask the Hornady Rep about the issues with you were having with your press? What did he say?
     
  7. Gas

    Gas Gig Harbor, Washington, United States Active Member

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    He said to put carbon grease on it, and also to de-bur the area where the primers are.
     
  8. CXD Arms

    CXD Arms Evergreen State New Member

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    Here are a couple things;

    Make sure the powder drop has been cleaned with some sort of solvent to completly remove ANY trace of oil or grease. Then spray with a dry lubricant such as graphite or teflon.

    You can also wipe the outside of the powder tube with a dryer sheet to remove static. I haven't needed to do this but it seems reasonable

    Keep the powder tube half full or more. The weight of the powder helps ensure the metering chamber gets filled.

    For the powder drop tube sleeves, you may need to experiment but you should only need the threaded tube and one of the sleeves. I found the best way to adjust the powder drop was to unscrew the powder die, raise a case to the top in that station and then screw the powder die down until the metering insert just about hits the top of the slot.

    Make sure you have the correct shellplate. I was using the .308 shellplate for 45ACP and the primers wouldn't fully seat. The height of the two cases are different with respect to the rim. I had to clean out the primer pockets to get the 45ACP primers to seat right. This isn't exactly the same primer issue, but could be related.

    If you have more questions or want more tips, let me know.
     
  9. Gas

    Gas Gig Harbor, Washington, United States Active Member

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    I guess the 700x powder is to blame. It is small flat flakes and hornady does not recommend it. I also have a can of tightgroup that I will try. One other thing I found out, I had the rifle check system in, and not the small pistol. I'm learning.:thumbup:

    I am surprised that the guy from hornady did not ask me about it. There was a small white box that I overlooked in the box, and low and behold there was the pistol gauge for the powder.
     
  10. tac

    tac UK, Oregon and Ontario. Well-Known Member

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    One thing you might consider getting is a powder baffle to go in the measure. It sounds complicated but it's only a piece of bent tin that forms a v-shaped 'shelf' inside the tube to prevent powder packing at the bottom.

    Costs a few bucks is all.

    tac
    Supporter of the Cape meares Lighthouse Restoration fund
     
  11. SAR1846

    SAR1846 Oregon Member

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    I second the powder baffle... helped me out with a few troublesome powders.
     
  12. tac

    tac UK, Oregon and Ontario. Well-Known Member

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    I KNEW there was a proper name for that thing! : )

    Thanks.

    tac
    Supporter of the Cape Meares Lighthouse Restoration Fund
     
  13. Taurus 617 CCW

    Taurus 617 CCW Northern Idaho Member

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    +3 on the powder baffle. It makes powder throws so much more consistent.
     
  14. Gas

    Gas Gig Harbor, Washington, United States Active Member

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    This thing? I have one that came with it, but nowhere does it show where it goes or how it goes on.
     
  15. Point356

    Point356 Southern Oregon New Member

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    It goes inside the powder hopper like this ^
     
  16. tac

    tac UK, Oregon and Ontario. Well-Known Member

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    Ah, just remember to put it in the hopper BEFORE you put in the powder. : )

    tac
    Supporter of the Cape Meares Lighthouse Restoration Fund
     
  17. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    Titegroup and 700x are great powders for the .45, you will find titegroup meters like sh** through a goose, it's phenomenal.

    As far as OAL's and the like. I don't know what type of gun you are firing it in, but I try to stay as close to milspec as possible.

    45acp1.jpg

    That should help