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load data question

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by chainsaw, May 29, 2010.

  1. chainsaw

    chainsaw East side of Or. Active Member

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    I have some 150 gr steel core bullets that are the same length as 165 gr sp's,Do I use the data for 150 gr,or 165 gr?Does length even effect the data?
     
  2. RockKrawler

    RockKrawler Gresham Member

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    You will use load data for the WEIGHT of the projectile.
    Pickup a couple of manuals,i like to have them ffrom the powder companies and the bullet manufactuers so that i can cross reference the info. Many times you will come across data that is inconsistent,so more than one point of reference is helpful.
    If using pull down components,get the loading data from the seller,it is usually available from their web sites.
    RK
     
  3. The Quiet Man

    The Quiet Man rural Washington County, Oregon Active Member

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    Essentially, the projectile's sectional density, ballistic coefficient and velocity dictate it's flight characteristics. You would use the 150 grain data. These differences become more apparent and important as distance increases.
     
  4. chainsaw

    chainsaw East side of Or. Active Member

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    Thanks,I figured but wanted to make sure.
     
  5. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    150 grain bullet, use 150 grain data.

    HOWEVER: With any bullet not of "conventional" design, (such as "steel core", a Nosler partition or Ballistic Tip, Winchester FailSafe, Barnes or other all-copper), start mild, and you may not be able to go to what is listed as maximum for a "conventional" design, garden variety jacketed lead bullet.

    These bullets develop high pressure generally at a powder charge that is slightly less than what is listed for a conventional bullet. Fortunately, Nosler and Barnes, etc. list safe and tested loads for their bullets in their books.

    This higher pressure is caused by the added length (greater bearing surface against the rifling) of those bullets as compared to a conventional bullet and/or decreased malleability ("softness") of the bullet against the rifling.

    This does not mean you will not be able to drive the bullet as fast, but rather that when you do drive it just as fast, the powder charge will be somewhat less, since max pressure has been reached.

    NEVER take a max load out of a book referring to a conventional bullet and use it to drive an unconventional one.
     
  6. Brandon44647

    Brandon44647 Portland Member

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    Read , research, study ! I have several reloading books, manuals & cd's that have been very helpful. And I'm always looking for more, you can never have to much information............... :twocents:
     
  7. chainsaw

    chainsaw East side of Or. Active Member

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    That is what I was thinking.longer bullet makes for more pressure in the barrel.Thanks all for the replys,I write all this info down in a spiral bound so I don't forget it.:D